Statistics by subject – Seniors

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All (13)

All (13) (13 of 13 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2011074
    Description:

    Discussions of pension adequacy for elderly Canadians have used the rate at which income falls with age; the income replacement rate or the ratio of post-retirement income to pre-retirement income. Use of income streams to assess post-retirement welfare requires a standard against which adequacy of the replacement rates can be judged. Because some expenditures (for example, work-related expenses) can be expected to fall after retirement, a declining income stream does not necessarily signal financial problems for seniors. More importantly, income as normally measured captures only part of what is available to seniors if households possess assets, which in retirement are not being used to generate measured income.

    This paper uses a different metric, referred to as "potential" income. Potential income is the sum of realized income and the income that could be realized from owned assets such as mutual funds and housing. Households prepare for retirement by saving and borrowing and investing the proceeds. The assets accumulated over a lifetime may or may not be drawn down in later years. If they are not, income streams underestimate the "potential" income available to support retirement. This paper takes this potential into account when comparing the pre- and post-retirement financial status of Canadian households.

    Release date: 2011-11-21

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100411578
    Description:

    This article examines changes since 1976 in a number of indicators that show the aging of Canadian workers and a growing number of workers delaying retirement. The increase in delayed retirement is consistent with an increase in the employment rate of older workers, however, it is at odds with statistics indicating that the average retirement age has remained surprisingly stable. This article attempts to reconcile the two apparently contradictory trends using a new expected working-life indicator.

    Release date: 2011-10-26

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111441
    Description:

    This chapter, entitled Senior Women, provides an overview of the situation of senior women in the population, analyzed from an historical perspective when applicable. We will examine their sociodemographic characteristics, including life expectancy, diversity, and family situation. Various factors are also associated with this population's well-being, such as social life, economic situation and health; we will therefore explore social networks and subjective well-being, volunteering, and the most recent trends in the labour force participation and income of senior women. Finally, we will present the most prevalent chronic health conditions in senior women, their lifestyle habits, the formal and informal care to which they have access, and the causes of death.

    Release date: 2011-07-26

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201100311515
    Description:

    This article profiles the population aged 50 or older who reported having been diagnosed with osteoporosis. Variables associated with increased risk of diagnosis and differences between 2004 and 2009 are presented. Intake of calcium and vitamin D from food and from supplements is analyzed by the presence or absence of osteoporosis.

    Release date: 2011-07-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2011335
    Description:

    In this study, the income management strategies of Canadian couples are examined using data from the 2007 General Social Survey. The extent to which "older" couples, in which at least one spouse or partner is aged 45 or older, employ an allocative, pooled, or separate strategy is explored. Results show that the income management strategies used by these couples are correlated with relationship characteristics, such as common-law status, duration of relationship, and the presence of children. As well, the likelihood of using a separate approach is positively correlated with levels of educational attainment and with the amount of income received by wives or female partners.

    Release date: 2011-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201100211473
    Description:

    Using data from the 2009 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) - Healthy Aging Cognition Module, this study examines correlates of low performance on four cognitive tasks among Canadians aged 65 or older who were living in private dwellings and who did not have Alzheimer's disease or dementia.

    Release date: 2011-06-15

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100211455
    Description:

    Some households provide money, goods and services directly to help other households: these interhousehold transfers add up to a sizeable flow of economic resources between households. While measured by Statistics Canada surveys, voluntary interhousehold transfers are not included in the recipient household's total income. This article examines the conceptual and measurement issues related to voluntary interhousehold transfers, and provides a profile of voluntary interhousehold transfers in Canada. It uses recent data on interhousehold transfers from income, expenditure and wealth surveys.

    Release date: 2011-05-25

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100211428
    Description:

    It is often assumed that over the life course most older workers will pay off their debts and save for retirement. However, research from the United States suggests that an increasing number of seniors who are in pre-retirement or are retired are now struggling with debt. This article uses the 2009 Canadian Financial Capability Survey to look at the proportion, type and level of debt among Canadian retirees age 55 and over. It examines the socio-economic and demographic factors influencing the likelihood of carrying any debt in retirement. The financial circumstances of indebted retirees are also examined, including three indicators of financial security.

    Release date: 2011-04-27

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100111431
    Description:

    Over the last two decades, the bankruptcy rate in Canada has been trending upwards, regardless of changing economic conditions; the age of people filing for bankruptcy has also been rising. Using the 2007 General Social Survey, this article identifies pre-retirees aged 45 to 64 who have experienced a bankruptcy and examines how they are preparing for retirement.

    Release date: 2011-04-21

  • Public use microdata: 82M0015X
    Description:

    The public use microdata file (PUMF) from the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) - Healthy Aging provides cross-sectional estimates at provincial and national levels. Data are based on interviews with approximately 31,000 respondents aged 45 or older residing in households in all provinces.

    The survey focuses on the various factors that impact healthy aging, such as general health and well-being, physical activity, use of health care services, social participation, as well as work and retirement transitions.

    Release date: 2011-04-01

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2011067
    Description:

    Studies of pre- and post-retirement annual income have focused on the extent to which income falls at this crucial stage in life. Although these studies vary in scope and intent, the overall consensus is that the Canadian retirement income system provides income replacement rates that are in the excess of 60% to 70% for a plurality of Canadians, especially for those who had low incomes during their prime working years. However, little has been published on the extent to which retirees maintain their same levels of consumption. Using data from the Survey of Family Expenditures (FAMEX) and from the Survey of Household Spending (SHS), this study develops a synthetic cohort approach to determine how the consumption patterns of households headed by individuals in their late 40s (in the early 1980s) differ from those of a group of households headed by individuals in their early 70s (in the late 2000s). It finds that, even though the nature of consumption changes over time, the overall levels of consumption "per adult" do not decline by substantial amounts among Canadians as they age.

    Release date: 2011-03-25

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100111400
    Description:

    A substantial proportion of working seniors are self-employed. This article uses census data to study self-employment among senior men and women. Trends in self-employment rates and categories are presented, along with occupational and industrial profiles. In addition, 2006 data are used to study factors associated with self-employment.

    Release date: 2011-01-31

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100111402
    Description:

    This study examines four distinct states of retirement among older Canadians: fully retired; partially retired; previously retired but returned to work; and never retired. Using the 2009 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) Healthy Aging, it presents the socio-economic characteristics of each group, and discusses their differing work patterns and health.

    Release date: 2011-01-31

Data (1)

Data (1) (1 result)

  • Public use microdata: 82M0015X
    Description:

    The public use microdata file (PUMF) from the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) - Healthy Aging provides cross-sectional estimates at provincial and national levels. Data are based on interviews with approximately 31,000 respondents aged 45 or older residing in households in all provinces.

    The survey focuses on the various factors that impact healthy aging, such as general health and well-being, physical activity, use of health care services, social participation, as well as work and retirement transitions.

    Release date: 2011-04-01

Analysis (12)

Analysis (12) (12 of 12 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2011074
    Description:

    Discussions of pension adequacy for elderly Canadians have used the rate at which income falls with age; the income replacement rate or the ratio of post-retirement income to pre-retirement income. Use of income streams to assess post-retirement welfare requires a standard against which adequacy of the replacement rates can be judged. Because some expenditures (for example, work-related expenses) can be expected to fall after retirement, a declining income stream does not necessarily signal financial problems for seniors. More importantly, income as normally measured captures only part of what is available to seniors if households possess assets, which in retirement are not being used to generate measured income.

    This paper uses a different metric, referred to as "potential" income. Potential income is the sum of realized income and the income that could be realized from owned assets such as mutual funds and housing. Households prepare for retirement by saving and borrowing and investing the proceeds. The assets accumulated over a lifetime may or may not be drawn down in later years. If they are not, income streams underestimate the "potential" income available to support retirement. This paper takes this potential into account when comparing the pre- and post-retirement financial status of Canadian households.

    Release date: 2011-11-21

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100411578
    Description:

    This article examines changes since 1976 in a number of indicators that show the aging of Canadian workers and a growing number of workers delaying retirement. The increase in delayed retirement is consistent with an increase in the employment rate of older workers, however, it is at odds with statistics indicating that the average retirement age has remained surprisingly stable. This article attempts to reconcile the two apparently contradictory trends using a new expected working-life indicator.

    Release date: 2011-10-26

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111441
    Description:

    This chapter, entitled Senior Women, provides an overview of the situation of senior women in the population, analyzed from an historical perspective when applicable. We will examine their sociodemographic characteristics, including life expectancy, diversity, and family situation. Various factors are also associated with this population's well-being, such as social life, economic situation and health; we will therefore explore social networks and subjective well-being, volunteering, and the most recent trends in the labour force participation and income of senior women. Finally, we will present the most prevalent chronic health conditions in senior women, their lifestyle habits, the formal and informal care to which they have access, and the causes of death.

    Release date: 2011-07-26

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201100311515
    Description:

    This article profiles the population aged 50 or older who reported having been diagnosed with osteoporosis. Variables associated with increased risk of diagnosis and differences between 2004 and 2009 are presented. Intake of calcium and vitamin D from food and from supplements is analyzed by the presence or absence of osteoporosis.

    Release date: 2011-07-20

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2011335
    Description:

    In this study, the income management strategies of Canadian couples are examined using data from the 2007 General Social Survey. The extent to which "older" couples, in which at least one spouse or partner is aged 45 or older, employ an allocative, pooled, or separate strategy is explored. Results show that the income management strategies used by these couples are correlated with relationship characteristics, such as common-law status, duration of relationship, and the presence of children. As well, the likelihood of using a separate approach is positively correlated with levels of educational attainment and with the amount of income received by wives or female partners.

    Release date: 2011-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201100211473
    Description:

    Using data from the 2009 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) - Healthy Aging Cognition Module, this study examines correlates of low performance on four cognitive tasks among Canadians aged 65 or older who were living in private dwellings and who did not have Alzheimer's disease or dementia.

    Release date: 2011-06-15

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100211455
    Description:

    Some households provide money, goods and services directly to help other households: these interhousehold transfers add up to a sizeable flow of economic resources between households. While measured by Statistics Canada surveys, voluntary interhousehold transfers are not included in the recipient household's total income. This article examines the conceptual and measurement issues related to voluntary interhousehold transfers, and provides a profile of voluntary interhousehold transfers in Canada. It uses recent data on interhousehold transfers from income, expenditure and wealth surveys.

    Release date: 2011-05-25

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100211428
    Description:

    It is often assumed that over the life course most older workers will pay off their debts and save for retirement. However, research from the United States suggests that an increasing number of seniors who are in pre-retirement or are retired are now struggling with debt. This article uses the 2009 Canadian Financial Capability Survey to look at the proportion, type and level of debt among Canadian retirees age 55 and over. It examines the socio-economic and demographic factors influencing the likelihood of carrying any debt in retirement. The financial circumstances of indebted retirees are also examined, including three indicators of financial security.

    Release date: 2011-04-27

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100111431
    Description:

    Over the last two decades, the bankruptcy rate in Canada has been trending upwards, regardless of changing economic conditions; the age of people filing for bankruptcy has also been rising. Using the 2007 General Social Survey, this article identifies pre-retirees aged 45 to 64 who have experienced a bankruptcy and examines how they are preparing for retirement.

    Release date: 2011-04-21

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2011067
    Description:

    Studies of pre- and post-retirement annual income have focused on the extent to which income falls at this crucial stage in life. Although these studies vary in scope and intent, the overall consensus is that the Canadian retirement income system provides income replacement rates that are in the excess of 60% to 70% for a plurality of Canadians, especially for those who had low incomes during their prime working years. However, little has been published on the extent to which retirees maintain their same levels of consumption. Using data from the Survey of Family Expenditures (FAMEX) and from the Survey of Household Spending (SHS), this study develops a synthetic cohort approach to determine how the consumption patterns of households headed by individuals in their late 40s (in the early 1980s) differ from those of a group of households headed by individuals in their early 70s (in the late 2000s). It finds that, even though the nature of consumption changes over time, the overall levels of consumption "per adult" do not decline by substantial amounts among Canadians as they age.

    Release date: 2011-03-25

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100111400
    Description:

    A substantial proportion of working seniors are self-employed. This article uses census data to study self-employment among senior men and women. Trends in self-employment rates and categories are presented, along with occupational and industrial profiles. In addition, 2006 data are used to study factors associated with self-employment.

    Release date: 2011-01-31

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X201100111402
    Description:

    This study examines four distinct states of retirement among older Canadians: fully retired; partially retired; previously retired but returned to work; and never retired. Using the 2009 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) Healthy Aging, it presents the socio-economic characteristics of each group, and discusses their differing work patterns and health.

    Release date: 2011-01-31

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