Statistics by subject – Seniors

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All (7)

All (7) (7 of 7 results)

  • Articles and reports: 89-652-X2014004
    Description:

    This is a fact sheet about end-of-life care. The results are based on data from the 2012 General Social Survey (GSS) on Caregiving and Care Receiving.

    Release date: 2014-10-03

  • Articles and reports: 89-652-X2014003
    Description:

    Using data from the 2012 General Social Survey (GSS) on Caregiving and Care Receiving, this report presents the number of young caregivers in Canada, the relationship of the caregiver to care recipient, the intensity of caregiving, and the types of care provided. The report also highlights the impact of caregiving duties on young caregivers, examining the possible consequences on education, paid work and mental and physical health.

    Release date: 2014-09-24

  • Articles and reports: 89-652-X2014002
    Description:

    Using the 2012 General Social Survey, the report profiles care receiving in Canada, providing an understanding of Canadians who rely on care in the home. Included in this discussion is an examination of the reasons for care, the types of people providing help, and the nature and intensity of care.

    Release date: 2014-06-13

  • Articles and reports: 89-652-X2013001
    Description:

    This issue examines Canadians who provide care to family or friends with chronic health conditions, disabilities or aging needs. The overall prevalence and intensity of caregiving are discussed, along with regional variations, the type of assistance provided, the duration of care, the characteristics of caregivers, and the extent of financial support to caregivers.

    Release date: 2013-09-10

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2013-01-30

  • Articles and reports: 89-584-M2004005
    Description:

    This paper presents a comprehensive examination of the daily lives, lifestyles and quality of life of Canadians at all stages in the life course. The transitional events studied in this document include: leaving school and entering the work force; leaving the household of origin to establish one's own household; becoming a spouse or life partner; becoming a parent; retirement; and the transitions associated with old age, death of a spouse and changes in living arrangements.

    We examine the way in which time is allocated across four aggregate activity categories (paid work and education, unpaid work, recreation and leisure, and personal care) and how time is distributed among the sub-categories within each. In order to better understand the personal, policy and practice relevance of life course transitions, we compare how respondents who have and have not experienced each transition event feel about their lives and about how they spend their time.

    Release date: 2004-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 89-584-M2004006
    Description:

    In the face of increasing life expectancy, population aging and feminization of the older population, historic lack of interest in the latter stages of the life course has given way to a more intense focus on later life transitions such as widowhood and shifting living arrangements. In this paper we examine the reallocation of daily activities and change in attitudes of Canadians that occur with the passages associated with living longer.

    Release date: 2004-09-09

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Analysis (7)

Analysis (7) (7 of 7 results)

  • Articles and reports: 89-652-X2014004
    Description:

    This is a fact sheet about end-of-life care. The results are based on data from the 2012 General Social Survey (GSS) on Caregiving and Care Receiving.

    Release date: 2014-10-03

  • Articles and reports: 89-652-X2014003
    Description:

    Using data from the 2012 General Social Survey (GSS) on Caregiving and Care Receiving, this report presents the number of young caregivers in Canada, the relationship of the caregiver to care recipient, the intensity of caregiving, and the types of care provided. The report also highlights the impact of caregiving duties on young caregivers, examining the possible consequences on education, paid work and mental and physical health.

    Release date: 2014-09-24

  • Articles and reports: 89-652-X2014002
    Description:

    Using the 2012 General Social Survey, the report profiles care receiving in Canada, providing an understanding of Canadians who rely on care in the home. Included in this discussion is an examination of the reasons for care, the types of people providing help, and the nature and intensity of care.

    Release date: 2014-06-13

  • Articles and reports: 89-652-X2013001
    Description:

    This issue examines Canadians who provide care to family or friends with chronic health conditions, disabilities or aging needs. The overall prevalence and intensity of caregiving are discussed, along with regional variations, the type of assistance provided, the duration of care, the characteristics of caregivers, and the extent of financial support to caregivers.

    Release date: 2013-09-10

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2013-01-30

  • Articles and reports: 89-584-M2004005
    Description:

    This paper presents a comprehensive examination of the daily lives, lifestyles and quality of life of Canadians at all stages in the life course. The transitional events studied in this document include: leaving school and entering the work force; leaving the household of origin to establish one's own household; becoming a spouse or life partner; becoming a parent; retirement; and the transitions associated with old age, death of a spouse and changes in living arrangements.

    We examine the way in which time is allocated across four aggregate activity categories (paid work and education, unpaid work, recreation and leisure, and personal care) and how time is distributed among the sub-categories within each. In order to better understand the personal, policy and practice relevance of life course transitions, we compare how respondents who have and have not experienced each transition event feel about their lives and about how they spend their time.

    Release date: 2004-09-09

  • Articles and reports: 89-584-M2004006
    Description:

    In the face of increasing life expectancy, population aging and feminization of the older population, historic lack of interest in the latter stages of the life course has given way to a more intense focus on later life transitions such as widowhood and shifting living arrangements. In this paper we examine the reallocation of daily activities and change in attitudes of Canadians that occur with the passages associated with living longer.

    Release date: 2004-09-09

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