Statistics by subject – Transportation

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All (5) (5 of 5 results)

  • Articles and reports: 16-002-X200900110820
    Description:

    Canada's northern residents face different transportation challenges than residents of the rest of the country. The cold climate, great distances and dispersed populations hinder road and rail construction and maintenance. This article presents recent transportation statistics for the North.

    Release date: 2009-03-26

  • Table: 50-002-X20060029517
    Description:

    To provide users with a complete picture of the financial and operational activities associated with Small For-hire Motor Carriers of Freight and Owner Operators in Canada.

    Release date: 2006-10-30

  • Technical products: 11F0024M20040007453
    Description:

    The responsibility for providing transportation infrastructure is shared between federal, provincial and municipal levels of government. Over the last decade, the federal government adopted policies of divestiture and reduced subsidies to transportation infrastructure investment and operations. These policies helped curb the growing public debt, but it would appear that transportation bore a disproportionate share of cutbacks. Federal transportation expenditures as a percentage of total federal expenditures fell from 2.8% in 1991/92 to 1.3% in 2001/02.

    The impacts of fiscal restraint are uneven. Gross federal spending on all modes, and total revenues from both tax and non-tax sources were analysed and reported in 2000 constant dollars. Real federal transportation spending decreased 57.3% from $5,392 million in 1991/92 to $2,302 million in 2001/02. Total revenues from transport kept pace with, or exceeded inflation. As a result, the financial impact on the federal treasury went from an annual deficit of $547 million in support of transport, to a surplus of $2.4 billion taken out of the transportation sector.

    This paper highlights the shifting federal support for transportation in the 1990's. As the burden for providing infrastructure has fallen heavier on transport users and other levels of government, the growing federal surplus of taxes and fees from transportation over expenditures in this sector is attracting more attention.

    Release date: 2004-11-25

  • Table: 53-222-X20000006589
    Description:

    The following study provides a financial picture of this group of independent owner operators over a period of eight years and includes comparisons with for-hire carriers of the same size involved in the same activities. It also describes the survey's constraints and the difficulty of measuring a group of workers as large and volatile as owner operators.

    Release date: 2002-03-22

  • Table: 50-002-X19970023095
    Description:

    Sixty-seven Top Canada-based for-hire motor carriers (those with annual revenues over $25 million) posted operating ratios of 0.95 and 0.96 respectively in the third and fourth quarter of 1996. These ratios are identical to those for the same period in 1995. By type of trucking activity, there were some changes for the Specialized Freight carriers where the operating ratio, compared to the same period last year, has deteriorated in the 3rd quarter (from 0.93 to 0.94) and improved in the 4th quarter (from 0.97 to 0.96) There was no change in the operating ratios for the General Freight carriers from a year earlier.

    Release date: 1997-06-04

Data (3)

Data (3) (3 results)

Analysis (1)

Analysis (1) (1 result)

  • Articles and reports: 16-002-X200900110820
    Description:

    Canada's northern residents face different transportation challenges than residents of the rest of the country. The cold climate, great distances and dispersed populations hinder road and rail construction and maintenance. This article presents recent transportation statistics for the North.

    Release date: 2009-03-26

Reference (1)

Reference (1) (1 result)

  • Technical products: 11F0024M20040007453
    Description:

    The responsibility for providing transportation infrastructure is shared between federal, provincial and municipal levels of government. Over the last decade, the federal government adopted policies of divestiture and reduced subsidies to transportation infrastructure investment and operations. These policies helped curb the growing public debt, but it would appear that transportation bore a disproportionate share of cutbacks. Federal transportation expenditures as a percentage of total federal expenditures fell from 2.8% in 1991/92 to 1.3% in 2001/02.

    The impacts of fiscal restraint are uneven. Gross federal spending on all modes, and total revenues from both tax and non-tax sources were analysed and reported in 2000 constant dollars. Real federal transportation spending decreased 57.3% from $5,392 million in 1991/92 to $2,302 million in 2001/02. Total revenues from transport kept pace with, or exceeded inflation. As a result, the financial impact on the federal treasury went from an annual deficit of $547 million in support of transport, to a surplus of $2.4 billion taken out of the transportation sector.

    This paper highlights the shifting federal support for transportation in the 1990's. As the burden for providing infrastructure has fallen heavier on transport users and other levels of government, the growing federal surplus of taxes and fees from transportation over expenditures in this sector is attracting more attention.

    Release date: 2004-11-25

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