Statistics by subject – Transportation

Other available resources to support your research.

Help for sorting results
Browse our central repository of key standard concepts, definitions, data sources and methods.
Loading
Loading in progress, please wait...
All (6)

All (6) (6 of 6 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 51-502-X
    Description:

    Aviation passenger traffic in Calgary and Edmonton were roughly equal in 1963 but the Calgary market has grown much larger than that of Edmonton. Reasons for growth in these two aviation markets often returned to the debate over a divided aviation market as the result of two airports (Edmonton) versus one at their major competitor (Calgary). It was often suggested that if flights could be consolidated into one airport, «market share» would cease to be lost to the competing airport.

    Major socio-economic variables used in airport passenger forecasting are examined to see if they help to explain the different growth patterns. Population does not appear to explain the differences. Income may be one explanatory factor, with the larger concentration of higher incomes in Calgary. The immigrant population of Calgary has grown faster in the last decade and net migration to Calgary from elsewhere in Canada has been higher--both could stimulate travel. With respect to economic activity stimulating aviation, Calgary has recently led Edmonton in the value of building permits, full-time employment and head office employment. While the socio-economic variables have favoured Calgary, especially in recent years, the decline of Edmonton's passenger aviation traffic, relative to Calgary, has slowed. This has occurred after the moving of most commercial aviation passenger flights from Edmonton City Centre airport to Edmonton International airport. This may support the position that Edmonton was losing aviation passenger traffic to Calgary before the consolidation of commercial aviation flights at Edmonton international airport.

    Release date: 2004-05-12

  • Journals and periodicals: 54F0001X
    Description:

    Canada's major container ports have competed successfully against their U.S. counterparts for overseas container traffic. However, the ocean container shipping industry is undergoing changes that will impact on their relationships with ports and competition among ports for container traffic has been fierce. This paper explores how Canadian ports might fare in this increasingly competitive environment, based on their natural and man-made attributes, their competitive stance and their potential to meet the evolving ocean container industry.

    The assessment includes a review of the ocean container shipping industry, the North American container market and competing ports in the United States (U.S.). This report uses data from two sources, Statistics Canada's marine international origin/destination (O/D) database and the U.S. Department of Transport Maritime Administration's (MARAD) Annual Import Export Waterborne Databank which is based on Journal of Commerce P.I.E.R.S. data.

    The keys to the success of Canadian container ports have been a combination of natural endowments, investments in intermodal facilities and competitive pricing. These factors are likely to continue into the future, however, the competition among container ports is likely to intensify as industry consolidation continues and as publicly funded U.S. intermodal terminal and corridor projects come to fruition.

    Release date: 2003-06-09

  • Journals and periodicals: 53F0007X
    Description:

    This analytical study uses Canadian Vehicle Survey data for 2000 to explain road use characteristics of young and aging drivers on a national basis. The analysis examines differences between two age groups - those aged 24 and under and those aged 55 and over - with the remainder of the population, those aged 25 to 54.

    The focus of the study is on when and why drivers choose to make road trips, and how the driving population compares with the population as a whole. Driver characteristics were compared with Canadian motor vehicle traffic collision statistics published by Transport Canada (1999) as a means of putting driving exposure into perspective.

    Release date: 2003-01-09

  • Journals and periodicals: 51F0009X
    Description:

    Since September 11, 2001, important changes in the financial and operating statistics of airline activities in Canada have taken place. In particular, most airline companies have seen a deterioration of their financial positions and the number of flights and of seats available have generally decreased while security measures have increased. The aim of this paper is to examine the post-September 11 aviation market in Canada with respect to one key operating characteristic: the number of flights of airline companies operating in Canada. More specifically, the following questions are addressed: Was there a recovery in airline activities in Canada since September 11? Were all losses in all sectors recovered (domestic, transborder and international)? Were all losses at all airports recovered?

    This paper is divided into three sections: 1. Data sources and limitations, the scope of this research and the methodological approach used are described in the first section. 2. The second section highlights the main results obtained and discusses these results in the context of the recent trends in airline activities in Canada. 3. Lastly, some conclusions are offered, based on the evidence collected and analysed.

    Release date: 2002-12-05

  • Journals and periodicals: 50F0003X
    Description:

    Travel Agencies in Canada enter the new millennium with many challenges. The gap that they must bridge is a possible erosion of both revenue and customers. The aviation industry has been imposing caps on commissions resulting in the requirement for agencies to sell more product to generate the same revenue. At the same time, selling more product could be more difficult as air carriers and hotels are increasingly offering more direct sales on the Internet. This web presence has enabled carriers and hotels to deliver their product bypassing the travel agencies in the supply chain. There is also increased competition from travel sales web-sites that attempt to attract the business that local travel agents once could have considered as their own. The paper will examine the nature of the challenges facing this service industry and the possible responses.

    Release date: 2000-06-08

  • Journals and periodicals: 53F0003X
    Description:

    For several years, urban transit ridership in Canada has been declining. In the late 1990s, ridership began to stabilize but at a level well below the peaks reached in previous years. Many have postulated reasons for the decline, including the dominance of the automobile, changes in work locations and hours, increasing fares, decreasing subsidies and increasing suburbanization.

    Using data from approximately 85 Canadian urban transit service providers, over a period of 8 years, this paper outlines the empirical results of analysis to measure factors that have affected urban transit ridership. Among the key goals of this project was the development of measures of fare elasticity.

    Demographic, socio-economic and level of service variables were used in the research to explain changes in ridership. A variety of dummy variables was also used to account for structural differences.

    The paper concludes with an examination of major Canadian cities that carry the majority of all commuters in the country.

    Release date: 2000-06-06

Data (0)

Data (0) (0 results)

Your search for "" found no results in this section of the site.

You may try:

Analysis (6)

Analysis (6) (6 of 6 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 51-502-X
    Description:

    Aviation passenger traffic in Calgary and Edmonton were roughly equal in 1963 but the Calgary market has grown much larger than that of Edmonton. Reasons for growth in these two aviation markets often returned to the debate over a divided aviation market as the result of two airports (Edmonton) versus one at their major competitor (Calgary). It was often suggested that if flights could be consolidated into one airport, «market share» would cease to be lost to the competing airport.

    Major socio-economic variables used in airport passenger forecasting are examined to see if they help to explain the different growth patterns. Population does not appear to explain the differences. Income may be one explanatory factor, with the larger concentration of higher incomes in Calgary. The immigrant population of Calgary has grown faster in the last decade and net migration to Calgary from elsewhere in Canada has been higher--both could stimulate travel. With respect to economic activity stimulating aviation, Calgary has recently led Edmonton in the value of building permits, full-time employment and head office employment. While the socio-economic variables have favoured Calgary, especially in recent years, the decline of Edmonton's passenger aviation traffic, relative to Calgary, has slowed. This has occurred after the moving of most commercial aviation passenger flights from Edmonton City Centre airport to Edmonton International airport. This may support the position that Edmonton was losing aviation passenger traffic to Calgary before the consolidation of commercial aviation flights at Edmonton international airport.

    Release date: 2004-05-12

  • Journals and periodicals: 54F0001X
    Description:

    Canada's major container ports have competed successfully against their U.S. counterparts for overseas container traffic. However, the ocean container shipping industry is undergoing changes that will impact on their relationships with ports and competition among ports for container traffic has been fierce. This paper explores how Canadian ports might fare in this increasingly competitive environment, based on their natural and man-made attributes, their competitive stance and their potential to meet the evolving ocean container industry.

    The assessment includes a review of the ocean container shipping industry, the North American container market and competing ports in the United States (U.S.). This report uses data from two sources, Statistics Canada's marine international origin/destination (O/D) database and the U.S. Department of Transport Maritime Administration's (MARAD) Annual Import Export Waterborne Databank which is based on Journal of Commerce P.I.E.R.S. data.

    The keys to the success of Canadian container ports have been a combination of natural endowments, investments in intermodal facilities and competitive pricing. These factors are likely to continue into the future, however, the competition among container ports is likely to intensify as industry consolidation continues and as publicly funded U.S. intermodal terminal and corridor projects come to fruition.

    Release date: 2003-06-09

  • Journals and periodicals: 53F0007X
    Description:

    This analytical study uses Canadian Vehicle Survey data for 2000 to explain road use characteristics of young and aging drivers on a national basis. The analysis examines differences between two age groups - those aged 24 and under and those aged 55 and over - with the remainder of the population, those aged 25 to 54.

    The focus of the study is on when and why drivers choose to make road trips, and how the driving population compares with the population as a whole. Driver characteristics were compared with Canadian motor vehicle traffic collision statistics published by Transport Canada (1999) as a means of putting driving exposure into perspective.

    Release date: 2003-01-09

  • Journals and periodicals: 51F0009X
    Description:

    Since September 11, 2001, important changes in the financial and operating statistics of airline activities in Canada have taken place. In particular, most airline companies have seen a deterioration of their financial positions and the number of flights and of seats available have generally decreased while security measures have increased. The aim of this paper is to examine the post-September 11 aviation market in Canada with respect to one key operating characteristic: the number of flights of airline companies operating in Canada. More specifically, the following questions are addressed: Was there a recovery in airline activities in Canada since September 11? Were all losses in all sectors recovered (domestic, transborder and international)? Were all losses at all airports recovered?

    This paper is divided into three sections: 1. Data sources and limitations, the scope of this research and the methodological approach used are described in the first section. 2. The second section highlights the main results obtained and discusses these results in the context of the recent trends in airline activities in Canada. 3. Lastly, some conclusions are offered, based on the evidence collected and analysed.

    Release date: 2002-12-05

  • Journals and periodicals: 50F0003X
    Description:

    Travel Agencies in Canada enter the new millennium with many challenges. The gap that they must bridge is a possible erosion of both revenue and customers. The aviation industry has been imposing caps on commissions resulting in the requirement for agencies to sell more product to generate the same revenue. At the same time, selling more product could be more difficult as air carriers and hotels are increasingly offering more direct sales on the Internet. This web presence has enabled carriers and hotels to deliver their product bypassing the travel agencies in the supply chain. There is also increased competition from travel sales web-sites that attempt to attract the business that local travel agents once could have considered as their own. The paper will examine the nature of the challenges facing this service industry and the possible responses.

    Release date: 2000-06-08

  • Journals and periodicals: 53F0003X
    Description:

    For several years, urban transit ridership in Canada has been declining. In the late 1990s, ridership began to stabilize but at a level well below the peaks reached in previous years. Many have postulated reasons for the decline, including the dominance of the automobile, changes in work locations and hours, increasing fares, decreasing subsidies and increasing suburbanization.

    Using data from approximately 85 Canadian urban transit service providers, over a period of 8 years, this paper outlines the empirical results of analysis to measure factors that have affected urban transit ridership. Among the key goals of this project was the development of measures of fare elasticity.

    Demographic, socio-economic and level of service variables were used in the research to explain changes in ridership. A variety of dummy variables was also used to account for structural differences.

    The paper concludes with an examination of major Canadian cities that carry the majority of all commuters in the country.

    Release date: 2000-06-06

Reference (0)

Reference (0) (0 results)

Your search for "" found no results in this section of the site.

You may try:

Browse our partners page to find a complete list of our partners and their associated products.

Date modified: