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All (39)

All (39) (25 of 39 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2017394
    Description:

    For many goods, such as dairy products and alcoholic beverages, the presence of substantial (non-tariff) barriers to provincial trade is widely recognized. If these non-tariff barriers matter, intraprovincial trade should be stronger than interprovincial trade, all else being equal. However, comparing intraprovincial and interprovincial trade levels is challenging, because intraprovincial trade is heavily skewed toward short-distance flows. When these are not properly taken into account by gravity-based trade models, intraprovincial trade levels—provincial border effects—tend to be overestimated.

    Release date: 2017-09-14

  • Articles and reports: 16-002-X201600214629
    Description:

    This study examines selected energy-related production, distribution, accidents and GHG emissions data over a ten year period (2005 to 2014).

    Release date: 2016-07-12

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2015099
    Description:

    In the aftermath of 9/11, a new security regime was imposed on Canada–U.S. truck-borne trade, raising the question of whether the border has ‘thickened.’ Did the cost of moving goods across the border by truck rise? If so, by how much, and have these additional costs persisted through time? Building on previous work that measured the premium paid by shippers to move goods across the Canada–U.S. border by truck, from the mid- to late 2000s, this paper extends the time series back to 1994, encompassing the pre- and post-9/11 eras.

    Release date: 2015-07-24

  • Articles and reports: 16-002-X201500114132
    Description:

    This study uses the Trucking Commodity Origin and Destination Survey to examine the dangerous goods transported by the Canadian for-hire trucking industry from 2004 to 2012, focusing on tonnage, types of goods and average distances.

    Release date: 2015-02-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2013026
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article reports on economic conditions in Canadian automotive industries, focusing on trends during the 2008-2009 recession and the recent recovery. For the purpose of this study, automotive industries refer to motor vehicle and parts manufacturing, and include motor vehicle manufacturing, motor vehicle parts manufacturing and motor vehicle body and trailer manufacturing.

    Release date: 2013-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2012020
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series examines how much crossing the border adds to the cost of moving goods by truck. It quantifies the cost of border delays, border-related compliance costs, and other costs associated with moving goods to and from Canada's main trading partner. It is based on the paper Trucking Across the Border: The Relative Cost of Cross-border and Domestic Trucking, 2004 to 2009, by William Anderson and Mark Brown.

    Release date: 2012-11-19

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2012081
    Description:

    Despite the elimination of tariff barriers between Canada and the United States, the volume of trade between the two countries has been less than would be expected if there were no impediments. While considerable work has been done to gauge the degree of integration between the Canadian and U.S. economies through trade, relatively little analysis has parsed out the underlying costs for cross-border trade. The costs of crossing the border can be divided into formal tariff barriers, non-tariff barriers, and the cost of the transport system itself. This paper focuses on the latter by estimating the cost of shipping goods by truck between Canada and the U.S. during the 2004-to-2009 period. The analysis assesses the degree to which costs to ship goods by truck to and from the U.S. exceed those within Canada by measuring the additional costs on a level and an ad valorem basis. The latter provides an estimate of the tariff equivalent transportation cost that applies to cross-border trade. These costs are further broken down into fixed and variable (line-haul) costs. Higher fixed costs are consistent with border delays and border compliance costs which are passed on to the consumers of trucking services. Higher line-haul costs may result from difficulties obtaining backhauls for a portion of the trip home. Such difficulties may stem from trade imbalances and regulations that restrict the ability of Canadian-based carriers to transport goods between two points in the United States.

    Release date: 2012-11-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201200111619
    Description:

    This article examines various issues related to seniors' access to transportation and to a vehicle. The first part focuses on determining which seniors have a driver's licence and drive a car, including those with the weakest visual, auditory, motor and cognitive faculties. The second part of the article describes seniors' main forms of transportation other than driving a car. The last part examines the impact of seniors' main form of transportation on their level of social participation.

    Release date: 2012-01-23

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100211531
    Description:

    This article examines various facets of travelling between home and work. First it provides information about commuting times and how frequently workers are caught in traffic. Second, it looks at workers' perceptions of the time they spend commuting as well as car users' perceptions of public transit. Finally a connection is drawn between the characteristics of commuting to work (commuting time, recurrence of traffic congestion, etc.) and selected subjective measures of quality of life, including stress levels and satisfaction with work-life balance.

    Release date: 2011-08-24

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2011072
    Description:

    The nature of the competitive process that causes a reallocation of market shares within an industry contributes to aggregate productivity growth. This paper extends our understanding of industry differences in the competitive process by examining firm turnover and productivity growth in various services industries in Canada and situating them relative to retailing and manufacturing, two industries which have been the focus of these studies in the past. Seven industries in the services sector, namely wholesale trade, transportation and warehousing, air transportation, truck transportation, broadcasting and telecommunications, business services and financial services, are examined.

    Release date: 2011-08-19

  • Articles and reports: 16-002-X201000411373
    Description:

    A focus on the use of transportation by older Canadians has important implications because of the large number of baby boomers that will soon be turning 65. This article looks at transportation used by senior Canadians, using data from the Canadian Community Health Survey: Healthy Aging.

    Release date: 2010-12-08

  • Articles and reports: 16-002-X201000211283
    Description:

    This study looks at access to and use of public transit in 2007, using data from the Households and the Environment Survey.

    Release date: 2010-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2008003
    Description:

    Using Statistics Canada's Business Register, this paper investigates the pattern of business establishments in each of the different census metropolitan and census agglomeration influenced zones across rural Canada.

    Release date: 2010-01-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900110824
    Description:

    In this article, we quantify and discuss the difference between the level of physical activity of residents of urban neighbourhoods compared to suburban neighbourhoods.

    Release date: 2009-04-02

  • Articles and reports: 16-002-X200900110820
    Description:

    Canada's northern residents face different transportation challenges than residents of the rest of the country. The cold climate, great distances and dispersed populations hinder road and rail construction and maintenance. This article presents recent transportation statistics for the North.

    Release date: 2009-03-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200800110503
    Description:

    In this article, we focus on the relationship between the types of neighbourhoods in which people live and the use of cars for daily travel. How much do residents of peripheral areas and low-density (suburban) neighbourhoods depend on cars in their daily lives compared with residents of more "urban" neighbourhoods? To what extent can residents of central neighbourhoods go about their day-to-day business without necessarily using a car? In which metropolitan areas is exclusive use of the automobile most common?

    Release date: 2008-01-22

  • Articles and reports: 16-002-X200700310455
    Description:

    This article examines driving and commuting patterns from a gender perspective. Trip chaining, the practice of stopping at intermediate points during a journey, is analyzed using data from the 2005 Canadian Vehicle Survey. Next-stage destinations and the number of stops made while driving are compared for men and women.

    Release date: 2007-12-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200700910332
    Description:

    This article finds that the volume of infrastructure capital has rebounded since 2000 after two decades of neglect. While infrastructure growth has been similar across regions, there are sharp differences in the type of asset targeted by the regions, especially when spending slowed after 1980.

    Release date: 2007-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20070059639
    Description:

    The auto industry has been a leading force in globalization, with overseas firms shifting production to North America following their success in sales. This paper looks at how Canada fared in attracting new domestic plants, and whether they behaved differently in buying parts locally and trading internationally.

    Release date: 2007-05-17

  • Articles and reports: 16-201-X20060009515
    Description:

    Our vast transportation system - roads, railways, airports, ports and vehicles - provides people and businesses with services that are fundamental to our standard of living and well-being.

    At the same time, transportation is a concern to Canadians from an environmental perspective. From greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution from burning fossil fuels to the fragmentation of wildlife habitat by transportation infrastructure, transportation activities impact the environment locally and globally.

    This article examines transportation activity in Canada and its environmental impacts - and the efforts of governments, businesses and citizens to help mitigate them - by painting a statistical portrait of Transportation in Canada.

    Release date: 2006-11-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2006044
    Description:

    This study reviews the transportation industry in 2005 focusing on trucking, aviation and railways components. Emerging and continuing trends for each component is examined for such thing as gross domestic product (GDP), employment and other variables specific to each mode of transport. This study also looks at a regional dimension of this industry.

    Release date: 2006-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2005032
    Description:

    This study provides an in-depth analysis of retail trade growth nationally and provincially, and explores the underlying socio-economic-demographic forces since the turn of the millennium. The automotive retail sector is given a closer look because of its ability to dictate retail sales growth during the period. This study uses data from a fleet of Statistics Canada surveys, including Monthly Retail Trade Survey, Provincial Economic Accounts, New Motor Vehicle Sales, Canadian Vehicle Survey, Motor Vehicle Registration, and 2002 Homeowner Repairs and Renovations Survey.

    Release date: 2005-10-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2005028
    Description:

    This study tests the perception that road congestion is growing in Canada, especially with the competition for road space between cars and trucks. It provides a view of the characteristics of the truck and car population on the roads in Canada based primarily on the registration and performance data available from the Canadian Vehicle Survey.

    Release date: 2005-05-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2005020
    Description:

    This study examines production and sales trends in automotive and light duty vehicle manufacturing in Canada and the United States from 1999 to 2004. It focuses on production and sales of sport utility vehicles.

    Release date: 2005-02-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2004224
    Description:

    This paper examines the likelihood of immigrants and the Canadian-born to use public transit. It also discusses implications for public transit services. It uses data from the 1996 and 2001 censuses of Canada.

    Release date: 2004-05-13

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Analysis (39)

Analysis (39) (25 of 39 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2017394
    Description:

    For many goods, such as dairy products and alcoholic beverages, the presence of substantial (non-tariff) barriers to provincial trade is widely recognized. If these non-tariff barriers matter, intraprovincial trade should be stronger than interprovincial trade, all else being equal. However, comparing intraprovincial and interprovincial trade levels is challenging, because intraprovincial trade is heavily skewed toward short-distance flows. When these are not properly taken into account by gravity-based trade models, intraprovincial trade levels—provincial border effects—tend to be overestimated.

    Release date: 2017-09-14

  • Articles and reports: 16-002-X201600214629
    Description:

    This study examines selected energy-related production, distribution, accidents and GHG emissions data over a ten year period (2005 to 2014).

    Release date: 2016-07-12

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2015099
    Description:

    In the aftermath of 9/11, a new security regime was imposed on Canada–U.S. truck-borne trade, raising the question of whether the border has ‘thickened.’ Did the cost of moving goods across the border by truck rise? If so, by how much, and have these additional costs persisted through time? Building on previous work that measured the premium paid by shippers to move goods across the Canada–U.S. border by truck, from the mid- to late 2000s, this paper extends the time series back to 1994, encompassing the pre- and post-9/11 eras.

    Release date: 2015-07-24

  • Articles and reports: 16-002-X201500114132
    Description:

    This study uses the Trucking Commodity Origin and Destination Survey to examine the dangerous goods transported by the Canadian for-hire trucking industry from 2004 to 2012, focusing on tonnage, types of goods and average distances.

    Release date: 2015-02-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2013026
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article reports on economic conditions in Canadian automotive industries, focusing on trends during the 2008-2009 recession and the recent recovery. For the purpose of this study, automotive industries refer to motor vehicle and parts manufacturing, and include motor vehicle manufacturing, motor vehicle parts manufacturing and motor vehicle body and trailer manufacturing.

    Release date: 2013-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2012020
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series examines how much crossing the border adds to the cost of moving goods by truck. It quantifies the cost of border delays, border-related compliance costs, and other costs associated with moving goods to and from Canada's main trading partner. It is based on the paper Trucking Across the Border: The Relative Cost of Cross-border and Domestic Trucking, 2004 to 2009, by William Anderson and Mark Brown.

    Release date: 2012-11-19

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2012081
    Description:

    Despite the elimination of tariff barriers between Canada and the United States, the volume of trade between the two countries has been less than would be expected if there were no impediments. While considerable work has been done to gauge the degree of integration between the Canadian and U.S. economies through trade, relatively little analysis has parsed out the underlying costs for cross-border trade. The costs of crossing the border can be divided into formal tariff barriers, non-tariff barriers, and the cost of the transport system itself. This paper focuses on the latter by estimating the cost of shipping goods by truck between Canada and the U.S. during the 2004-to-2009 period. The analysis assesses the degree to which costs to ship goods by truck to and from the U.S. exceed those within Canada by measuring the additional costs on a level and an ad valorem basis. The latter provides an estimate of the tariff equivalent transportation cost that applies to cross-border trade. These costs are further broken down into fixed and variable (line-haul) costs. Higher fixed costs are consistent with border delays and border compliance costs which are passed on to the consumers of trucking services. Higher line-haul costs may result from difficulties obtaining backhauls for a portion of the trip home. Such difficulties may stem from trade imbalances and regulations that restrict the ability of Canadian-based carriers to transport goods between two points in the United States.

    Release date: 2012-11-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201200111619
    Description:

    This article examines various issues related to seniors' access to transportation and to a vehicle. The first part focuses on determining which seniors have a driver's licence and drive a car, including those with the weakest visual, auditory, motor and cognitive faculties. The second part of the article describes seniors' main forms of transportation other than driving a car. The last part examines the impact of seniors' main form of transportation on their level of social participation.

    Release date: 2012-01-23

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201100211531
    Description:

    This article examines various facets of travelling between home and work. First it provides information about commuting times and how frequently workers are caught in traffic. Second, it looks at workers' perceptions of the time they spend commuting as well as car users' perceptions of public transit. Finally a connection is drawn between the characteristics of commuting to work (commuting time, recurrence of traffic congestion, etc.) and selected subjective measures of quality of life, including stress levels and satisfaction with work-life balance.

    Release date: 2011-08-24

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2011072
    Description:

    The nature of the competitive process that causes a reallocation of market shares within an industry contributes to aggregate productivity growth. This paper extends our understanding of industry differences in the competitive process by examining firm turnover and productivity growth in various services industries in Canada and situating them relative to retailing and manufacturing, two industries which have been the focus of these studies in the past. Seven industries in the services sector, namely wholesale trade, transportation and warehousing, air transportation, truck transportation, broadcasting and telecommunications, business services and financial services, are examined.

    Release date: 2011-08-19

  • Articles and reports: 16-002-X201000411373
    Description:

    A focus on the use of transportation by older Canadians has important implications because of the large number of baby boomers that will soon be turning 65. This article looks at transportation used by senior Canadians, using data from the Canadian Community Health Survey: Healthy Aging.

    Release date: 2010-12-08

  • Articles and reports: 16-002-X201000211283
    Description:

    This study looks at access to and use of public transit in 2007, using data from the Households and the Environment Survey.

    Release date: 2010-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2008003
    Description:

    Using Statistics Canada's Business Register, this paper investigates the pattern of business establishments in each of the different census metropolitan and census agglomeration influenced zones across rural Canada.

    Release date: 2010-01-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900110824
    Description:

    In this article, we quantify and discuss the difference between the level of physical activity of residents of urban neighbourhoods compared to suburban neighbourhoods.

    Release date: 2009-04-02

  • Articles and reports: 16-002-X200900110820
    Description:

    Canada's northern residents face different transportation challenges than residents of the rest of the country. The cold climate, great distances and dispersed populations hinder road and rail construction and maintenance. This article presents recent transportation statistics for the North.

    Release date: 2009-03-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200800110503
    Description:

    In this article, we focus on the relationship between the types of neighbourhoods in which people live and the use of cars for daily travel. How much do residents of peripheral areas and low-density (suburban) neighbourhoods depend on cars in their daily lives compared with residents of more "urban" neighbourhoods? To what extent can residents of central neighbourhoods go about their day-to-day business without necessarily using a car? In which metropolitan areas is exclusive use of the automobile most common?

    Release date: 2008-01-22

  • Articles and reports: 16-002-X200700310455
    Description:

    This article examines driving and commuting patterns from a gender perspective. Trip chaining, the practice of stopping at intermediate points during a journey, is analyzed using data from the 2005 Canadian Vehicle Survey. Next-stage destinations and the number of stops made while driving are compared for men and women.

    Release date: 2007-12-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200700910332
    Description:

    This article finds that the volume of infrastructure capital has rebounded since 2000 after two decades of neglect. While infrastructure growth has been similar across regions, there are sharp differences in the type of asset targeted by the regions, especially when spending slowed after 1980.

    Release date: 2007-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20070059639
    Description:

    The auto industry has been a leading force in globalization, with overseas firms shifting production to North America following their success in sales. This paper looks at how Canada fared in attracting new domestic plants, and whether they behaved differently in buying parts locally and trading internationally.

    Release date: 2007-05-17

  • Articles and reports: 16-201-X20060009515
    Description:

    Our vast transportation system - roads, railways, airports, ports and vehicles - provides people and businesses with services that are fundamental to our standard of living and well-being.

    At the same time, transportation is a concern to Canadians from an environmental perspective. From greenhouse gas emissions and air pollution from burning fossil fuels to the fragmentation of wildlife habitat by transportation infrastructure, transportation activities impact the environment locally and globally.

    This article examines transportation activity in Canada and its environmental impacts - and the efforts of governments, businesses and citizens to help mitigate them - by painting a statistical portrait of Transportation in Canada.

    Release date: 2006-11-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2006044
    Description:

    This study reviews the transportation industry in 2005 focusing on trucking, aviation and railways components. Emerging and continuing trends for each component is examined for such thing as gross domestic product (GDP), employment and other variables specific to each mode of transport. This study also looks at a regional dimension of this industry.

    Release date: 2006-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2005032
    Description:

    This study provides an in-depth analysis of retail trade growth nationally and provincially, and explores the underlying socio-economic-demographic forces since the turn of the millennium. The automotive retail sector is given a closer look because of its ability to dictate retail sales growth during the period. This study uses data from a fleet of Statistics Canada surveys, including Monthly Retail Trade Survey, Provincial Economic Accounts, New Motor Vehicle Sales, Canadian Vehicle Survey, Motor Vehicle Registration, and 2002 Homeowner Repairs and Renovations Survey.

    Release date: 2005-10-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2005028
    Description:

    This study tests the perception that road congestion is growing in Canada, especially with the competition for road space between cars and trucks. It provides a view of the characteristics of the truck and car population on the roads in Canada based primarily on the registration and performance data available from the Canadian Vehicle Survey.

    Release date: 2005-05-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2005020
    Description:

    This study examines production and sales trends in automotive and light duty vehicle manufacturing in Canada and the United States from 1999 to 2004. It focuses on production and sales of sport utility vehicles.

    Release date: 2005-02-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2004224
    Description:

    This paper examines the likelihood of immigrants and the Canadian-born to use public transit. It also discusses implications for public transit services. It uses data from the 1996 and 2001 censuses of Canada.

    Release date: 2004-05-13

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