Statistics by subject – Transportation

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All (3)

All (3) (3 results)

  • Technical products: 16-001-M2009009
    Description:

    The Canadian Vehicle Survey (CVS) is a voluntary, vehicle-based survey that provides quarterly and annual estimates of road vehicle activity. This includes vehicle-kilometres and passenger-kilometres as well as a number of other elements related to the trip such as sex of driver, time of day and season.

    In 2007, the sample size of the CVS was increased in order to address a data gap regarding consumption of fuel for personal use. The CVS was seen as a possible solution to getting better insight into the household component of fuel consumption. By differentiating between types of vehicle use the CVS can provide estimates of fuel consumed for personal and business purposes.

    The aims of this report are twofold. The first is to present a national, annual profile of vehicle fuel consumption by type of use. The second is to compare the fuel quantities produced by the CVS with other known data sources, especially those data generated by Statistics Canada. This data comparison will provide grounding for future work using this data. Explanations are put forward to account for discrepancies between the data.

    Release date: 2009-11-05

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2005014
    Description:

    This working paper highlights a variety of aspects of innovation in selected transportation industries, including incidence and types of innovation, novelty of innovation, innovation activities, sources of information and collaboration, problems and obstacles to innovation and impacts of innovation.

    Release date: 2005-11-02

  • Technical products: 11F0024M20040007453
    Description:

    The responsibility for providing transportation infrastructure is shared between federal, provincial and municipal levels of government. Over the last decade, the federal government adopted policies of divestiture and reduced subsidies to transportation infrastructure investment and operations. These policies helped curb the growing public debt, but it would appear that transportation bore a disproportionate share of cutbacks. Federal transportation expenditures as a percentage of total federal expenditures fell from 2.8% in 1991/92 to 1.3% in 2001/02.

    The impacts of fiscal restraint are uneven. Gross federal spending on all modes, and total revenues from both tax and non-tax sources were analysed and reported in 2000 constant dollars. Real federal transportation spending decreased 57.3% from $5,392 million in 1991/92 to $2,302 million in 2001/02. Total revenues from transport kept pace with, or exceeded inflation. As a result, the financial impact on the federal treasury went from an annual deficit of $547 million in support of transport, to a surplus of $2.4 billion taken out of the transportation sector.

    This paper highlights the shifting federal support for transportation in the 1990's. As the burden for providing infrastructure has fallen heavier on transport users and other levels of government, the growing federal surplus of taxes and fees from transportation over expenditures in this sector is attracting more attention.

    Release date: 2004-11-25

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Reference (3)

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  • Technical products: 16-001-M2009009
    Description:

    The Canadian Vehicle Survey (CVS) is a voluntary, vehicle-based survey that provides quarterly and annual estimates of road vehicle activity. This includes vehicle-kilometres and passenger-kilometres as well as a number of other elements related to the trip such as sex of driver, time of day and season.

    In 2007, the sample size of the CVS was increased in order to address a data gap regarding consumption of fuel for personal use. The CVS was seen as a possible solution to getting better insight into the household component of fuel consumption. By differentiating between types of vehicle use the CVS can provide estimates of fuel consumed for personal and business purposes.

    The aims of this report are twofold. The first is to present a national, annual profile of vehicle fuel consumption by type of use. The second is to compare the fuel quantities produced by the CVS with other known data sources, especially those data generated by Statistics Canada. This data comparison will provide grounding for future work using this data. Explanations are put forward to account for discrepancies between the data.

    Release date: 2009-11-05

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2005014
    Description:

    This working paper highlights a variety of aspects of innovation in selected transportation industries, including incidence and types of innovation, novelty of innovation, innovation activities, sources of information and collaboration, problems and obstacles to innovation and impacts of innovation.

    Release date: 2005-11-02

  • Technical products: 11F0024M20040007453
    Description:

    The responsibility for providing transportation infrastructure is shared between federal, provincial and municipal levels of government. Over the last decade, the federal government adopted policies of divestiture and reduced subsidies to transportation infrastructure investment and operations. These policies helped curb the growing public debt, but it would appear that transportation bore a disproportionate share of cutbacks. Federal transportation expenditures as a percentage of total federal expenditures fell from 2.8% in 1991/92 to 1.3% in 2001/02.

    The impacts of fiscal restraint are uneven. Gross federal spending on all modes, and total revenues from both tax and non-tax sources were analysed and reported in 2000 constant dollars. Real federal transportation spending decreased 57.3% from $5,392 million in 1991/92 to $2,302 million in 2001/02. Total revenues from transport kept pace with, or exceeded inflation. As a result, the financial impact on the federal treasury went from an annual deficit of $547 million in support of transport, to a surplus of $2.4 billion taken out of the transportation sector.

    This paper highlights the shifting federal support for transportation in the 1990's. As the burden for providing infrastructure has fallen heavier on transport users and other levels of government, the growing federal surplus of taxes and fees from transportation over expenditures in this sector is attracting more attention.

    Release date: 2004-11-25

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