Statistics by subject – Transportation

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All (9)

All (9) (9 of 9 results)

  • Table: 50-002-X20040058639
    Description:

    To provide users with a complete picture of the financial and operational activities associated with Small For-hire Motor Carriers of Freight and Owner Operators in Canada.

    Release date: 2004-12-24

  • Technical products: 11F0024M20040007453
    Description:

    The responsibility for providing transportation infrastructure is shared between federal, provincial and municipal levels of government. Over the last decade, the federal government adopted policies of divestiture and reduced subsidies to transportation infrastructure investment and operations. These policies helped curb the growing public debt, but it would appear that transportation bore a disproportionate share of cutbacks. Federal transportation expenditures as a percentage of total federal expenditures fell from 2.8% in 1991/92 to 1.3% in 2001/02.

    The impacts of fiscal restraint are uneven. Gross federal spending on all modes, and total revenues from both tax and non-tax sources were analysed and reported in 2000 constant dollars. Real federal transportation spending decreased 57.3% from $5,392 million in 1991/92 to $2,302 million in 2001/02. Total revenues from transport kept pace with, or exceeded inflation. As a result, the financial impact on the federal treasury went from an annual deficit of $547 million in support of transport, to a surplus of $2.4 billion taken out of the transportation sector.

    This paper highlights the shifting federal support for transportation in the 1990's. As the burden for providing infrastructure has fallen heavier on transport users and other levels of government, the growing federal surplus of taxes and fees from transportation over expenditures in this sector is attracting more attention.

    Release date: 2004-11-25

  • Index and guides: 96-328-M2004013
    Description:

    Western Canadian grain farmers are seeing profound economic and technological changes in their industry. This activity looks at the ways in which these trends have affected grain elevators and grain transportation in Western Canada.

    Release date: 2004-08-30

  • Table: 50-002-X20040047024
    Description:

    To provide data users with a more complete picture of the activies associated with the Couriers and Local Messengers industry.

    Release date: 2004-07-14

  • Table: 50-002-X20040038642
    Description:

    The survey collects annual financial, operating and employment data on bus companies operating in Canada. It also includes municipalities and government agencies that operate urban transit and commuter services. The data are used as input to the Canadian System of National Accounts, by Transport Canada, other federal and provincial departments, and by transportation companies, consulting firms, universities and foreign governments. The information is used for the analysis of transportation activity, for marketing and economic studies, as well as industry performance measures.

    Release date: 2004-07-12

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2004224
    Description:

    This paper examines the likelihood of immigrants and the Canadian-born to use public transit. It also discusses implications for public transit services. It uses data from the 1996 and 2001 censuses of Canada.

    Release date: 2004-05-13

  • Journals and periodicals: 51-502-X
    Description:

    Aviation passenger traffic in Calgary and Edmonton were roughly equal in 1963 but the Calgary market has grown much larger than that of Edmonton. Reasons for growth in these two aviation markets often returned to the debate over a divided aviation market as the result of two airports (Edmonton) versus one at their major competitor (Calgary). It was often suggested that if flights could be consolidated into one airport, «market share» would cease to be lost to the competing airport.

    Major socio-economic variables used in airport passenger forecasting are examined to see if they help to explain the different growth patterns. Population does not appear to explain the differences. Income may be one explanatory factor, with the larger concentration of higher incomes in Calgary. The immigrant population of Calgary has grown faster in the last decade and net migration to Calgary from elsewhere in Canada has been higher--both could stimulate travel. With respect to economic activity stimulating aviation, Calgary has recently led Edmonton in the value of building permits, full-time employment and head office employment. While the socio-economic variables have favoured Calgary, especially in recent years, the decline of Edmonton's passenger aviation traffic, relative to Calgary, has slowed. This has occurred after the moving of most commercial aviation passenger flights from Edmonton City Centre airport to Edmonton International airport. This may support the position that Edmonton was losing aviation passenger traffic to Calgary before the consolidation of commercial aviation flights at Edmonton international airport.

    Release date: 2004-05-12

  • Table: 50-002-X20040026892
    Description:

    To provide data users with a more complete picture of passengers bus and urban transit activities.

    Release date: 2004-04-30

  • Table: 50-002-X20040018641
    Description:

    To provide data users with financial and operational data from Canadian-domiciled water carriers whose principle activity is marine transport.

    Release date: 2004-02-09

Data (5)

Data (5) (5 of 5 results)

Analysis (2)

Analysis (2) (2 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2004224
    Description:

    This paper examines the likelihood of immigrants and the Canadian-born to use public transit. It also discusses implications for public transit services. It uses data from the 1996 and 2001 censuses of Canada.

    Release date: 2004-05-13

  • Journals and periodicals: 51-502-X
    Description:

    Aviation passenger traffic in Calgary and Edmonton were roughly equal in 1963 but the Calgary market has grown much larger than that of Edmonton. Reasons for growth in these two aviation markets often returned to the debate over a divided aviation market as the result of two airports (Edmonton) versus one at their major competitor (Calgary). It was often suggested that if flights could be consolidated into one airport, «market share» would cease to be lost to the competing airport.

    Major socio-economic variables used in airport passenger forecasting are examined to see if they help to explain the different growth patterns. Population does not appear to explain the differences. Income may be one explanatory factor, with the larger concentration of higher incomes in Calgary. The immigrant population of Calgary has grown faster in the last decade and net migration to Calgary from elsewhere in Canada has been higher--both could stimulate travel. With respect to economic activity stimulating aviation, Calgary has recently led Edmonton in the value of building permits, full-time employment and head office employment. While the socio-economic variables have favoured Calgary, especially in recent years, the decline of Edmonton's passenger aviation traffic, relative to Calgary, has slowed. This has occurred after the moving of most commercial aviation passenger flights from Edmonton City Centre airport to Edmonton International airport. This may support the position that Edmonton was losing aviation passenger traffic to Calgary before the consolidation of commercial aviation flights at Edmonton international airport.

    Release date: 2004-05-12

Reference (2)

Reference (2) (2 results)

  • Technical products: 11F0024M20040007453
    Description:

    The responsibility for providing transportation infrastructure is shared between federal, provincial and municipal levels of government. Over the last decade, the federal government adopted policies of divestiture and reduced subsidies to transportation infrastructure investment and operations. These policies helped curb the growing public debt, but it would appear that transportation bore a disproportionate share of cutbacks. Federal transportation expenditures as a percentage of total federal expenditures fell from 2.8% in 1991/92 to 1.3% in 2001/02.

    The impacts of fiscal restraint are uneven. Gross federal spending on all modes, and total revenues from both tax and non-tax sources were analysed and reported in 2000 constant dollars. Real federal transportation spending decreased 57.3% from $5,392 million in 1991/92 to $2,302 million in 2001/02. Total revenues from transport kept pace with, or exceeded inflation. As a result, the financial impact on the federal treasury went from an annual deficit of $547 million in support of transport, to a surplus of $2.4 billion taken out of the transportation sector.

    This paper highlights the shifting federal support for transportation in the 1990's. As the burden for providing infrastructure has fallen heavier on transport users and other levels of government, the growing federal surplus of taxes and fees from transportation over expenditures in this sector is attracting more attention.

    Release date: 2004-11-25

  • Index and guides: 96-328-M2004013
    Description:

    Western Canadian grain farmers are seeing profound economic and technological changes in their industry. This activity looks at the ways in which these trends have affected grain elevators and grain transportation in Western Canada.

    Release date: 2004-08-30

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