Statistics by subject – Health and well-being

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All (116)

All (116) (25 of 116 results)

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Analysis (90)

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  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201700714844
    Description:

    This study provides national counts (excluding Quebec) of acute care hospitalizations and the leading diagnoses for Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children (ages 0 to 9) and youth (ages 10 to 19). Data are presented for First Nations people living on and off reserve, Métis, and Inuit living in Inuit Nunangat. The analysis is based on socio-demographic information (including Aboriginal identity) from the 2006 Census that was linked to hospital discharge records.

    Release date: 2017-07-19

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201700414789
    Description:

    This study examines whether First Nations Aboriginal identity is associated with a greater likelihood of hospitalization for selected respiratory conditions when adjusting not only for housing, but also for location (on or off reserves, urban or rural) and household income. The analyses are based on information from the 2006 Census linked to hospital discharge data from the Discharge Abstract Database.

    Release date: 2017-04-19

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-653-X
    Description:

    The Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS) is a national survey on the social and economic conditions of First Nations people living off reserve, Métis and Inuit aged 6 years and over. The 2012 APS represents the fourth cycle of the survey and focuses on issues of education, employment and health.

    Release date: 2017-03-21

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-03-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201700114787
    Description:

    This paper examines associations between breastfeeding and select chronic conditions—asthma/chronic bronchitis and chronic ear infections—among off-reserve First Nations, Métis and Inuit children in Canada aged 1 to 5 years. Data are from the 2006 Aboriginal Children’s Survey, and each Aboriginal group was studied separately. Two aspects of breastfeeding are examined: feeding history (e.g. bottle-fed, breastfed, or both) and duration of breastfeeding.

    Release date: 2017-03-20

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-02-01

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201700114774
    Description:

    Using data from the 2012 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS), this study examines the prevalence of food insecurity among Inuit aged 25 and over living in Inuit Nunangat, and the factors associated with food insecurity among Inuit adults. Food insecurity can refer to situations when the amount of food purchased does not last and there is not enough money to buy more food, balanced meals are unaffordable, or household members cut the size of their meals or skip meals because there is not enough money for sufficient food. This study also discusses some of the health outcomes of Inuit adults who live in a food insecure household.

    Release date: 2017-02-01

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-12-09

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-10-13

  • Articles and reports: 89-653-X2016011
    Description:

    For decades, researchers have reported high suicide rates among Aboriginal youth, which are several times higher than rates in the non-Aboriginal population. Based on the 2012 Aboriginal Peoples Survey, this article presents estimates of suicidal thoughts among off-reserve First Nations, Métis and Inuit adults aged 18 to 25. It examines associations between past-year suicidal thoughts and mental disorders and personality factors, childhood experiences and family characteristics, and socio-demographic characteristics, many of which have been shown to be related to suicidal thoughts in other populations.

    Release date: 2016-10-13

  • Articles and reports: 89-653-X2016012
    Description:

    Suicide rates are significantly higher among First Nations, Métis and Inuit than among the non-Aboriginal population, particularly for younger age groups. Suicidal thoughts, which precede suicide attempts and completions, have been reported to be higher in some Aboriginal groups compared to the non-Aboriginal population. This factsheet presents prevalence of lifetime and past-year suicidal thoughts among off-reserve First Nations, Métis and Inuit in three adult age groups (18-25, 26-59 and 65+ years), by sex, and where possible, in comparison to those of non-Aboriginal adults.

    Release date: 2016-10-13

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2016379
    Description:

    Comparative studies of intergenerational earnings and income mobility largely rank Canada as one of the most mobile countries among advanced economies, such as Denmark, Finland and Norway. The assertion that Canada is a highly mobile society is drawn from intergenerational income elasticity estimates reported in Corak and Heisz (1999). Corak and Heisz used data from the earlier version of the Intergenerational Income Database (IID), which tracked income of Canadian youth only into their early thirties. Recent theoretical literature, however, suggests that the relationship between childrens’ and parents’ lifetime income may not be accurately estimated when children’s income are not observed from their mid-careers— known as lifecycle bias. The present study addresses this concern by re-examining the extent of intergenerational earnings and income mobility in Canada using the updated version of the IID, which tracks children well into their mid-forties, when mid-career income are observed.

    Release date: 2016-06-17

  • Articles and reports: 89-653-X2016010
    Description:

    This article explores the relationship between various social determinants of health and selected health outcomes for First Nations people aged 15 and older living off-reserve. Specifically, the following social determinants are explored: health behaviours (smoking, alcohol consumption, obesity), physical environments (housing, mobility, employment, education, income, food security), access to health resources, cultural continuity (participation in traditional activities, Aboriginal language, social support), and residential school attendance. An integrated life course and social determinants model of Aboriginal health framework is used to guide the analysis.

    Release date: 2016-04-12

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114313
    Description:

    The chapter entitled "Women in Canada: First Nations, Métis and Inuit Women" explores the diverse circumstances and experiences of Aboriginal women in Canada. Overall, the chapter highlights demographic characteristics, families, housing, knowledge of Aboriginal languages, employment, income, education, and health. Where appropriate, comparisons have been made between the Aboriginal female population and the non-Aboriginal female population as well as the Aboriginal female population and Aboriginal male population. Wherever possible, information is provided for First Nations, Métis and Inuit women separately.

    Release date: 2016-02-23

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-02-22

  • Articles and reports: 89-653-X2016009
    Description:

    The health and well-being of the Inuit population falls below that of the total population in Canada (Chief Public Health Officer, 2008). Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami—the national organization of Inuit in Canada—has stated that “this health gap in many respects is a symptom of poor socio-economic conditions in Inuit communities which are characterized by high poverty rates, low levels of education, limited employment opportunities, and inadequate housing conditions” (Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, 2014). These factors are known as social determinants of health.

    This study examines the social determinants of health for Inuit aged 15 to 54 years, living in Inuit Nunangat. Data were taken from the 2012 Aboriginal Peoples Survey. Multivariate analysis was conducted using a logistic regression model, in order to test the association between the social determinants of health and the outcome of excellent or very good self-reported health.

    Release date: 2016-02-22

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-01-19

  • Articles and reports: 89-653-X2016008
    Description:

    Based on data from the 2012 Aboriginal Peoples Survey, this article presents prevalence estimates of suicidal thoughts among First Nations living off-reserve, Métis and Inuit aged 26 to 59. It examines associations between suicidal thoughts and mental health, socio-demographic and other characteristics, many of which have been shown to be related to suicidal thoughts in other populations.

    Release date: 2016-01-19

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2015-11-17

  • Articles and reports: 89-653-X2015007
    Description:

    Within the last decade, Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami has identified mental wellness as the single most important health issue for Inuit (Alianait Inuit-specific Mental Wellness Task Group, 2007). Understanding the complex arrangements of circumstances, behaviours and relationships that are associated with mental health—often termed social determinants—may provide a window for policy makers in addressing mental distress among Inuit.

    Using the 2012 Aboriginal Peoples Survey, this study examines the social determinants of higher mental distress among Inuit aged 18 years and over, living in Inuit Nunangat. Mental distress was studied using the ten-item Kessler distress scale (K10); and multivariate analysis was conducted using a logistic regression model.

    Release date: 2015-11-17

  • Articles and reports: 89-653-X2014003
    Description:

    The Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS) is a national survey on the social and economic conditions of Aboriginal Peoples (First Nations people living off reserve, Métis and Inuit) aged 6 years and over. The 2012 APS represents the fourth cycle of the survey and focuses on issues of education, employment and health.

    The article “Inuit health: Selected findings from the 2012 Aboriginal Peoples Survey” reports on the self-reported health status and chronic conditions of Inuit aged 15 years and older. Also covered are health behaviors such as smoking and drinking, and selected determinants of health such as food insecurity, access to health care, housing and culture. The results are for all Inuit in Canada, presented by the total population, inside and outside Inuit Nunangat and the four Inuit regions.

    Release date: 2014-08-26

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201400211902
    Description:

    Based on 2004/2005 to 2009/2010 data from the Discharge Abstract Database, this study examines associations between unintentional injury hospitalizations and socio-economic status and location relative to an urban core in Dissemination Areas with a high percentage of First Nations identity residents versus a low percentage of Aboriginal identity residents based on the predominant Aboriginal group.

    Release date: 2014-02-19

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201300711853
    Description:

    This study uses an area-based approach to identify acute myocardial infarction hospital patients who live in Dissemination Areas with relatively high percentages of First Nations residents. Within the patient cohort, procedures received during the hospital admission were identified.

    Release date: 2013-07-17

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201300411776
    Description:

    Based on the results of Statistics Canada's 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey, this article presents an overview of how often First Nations children living off reserve, Métis children and Inuit children aged 2 to 5 consume various types of food, including foods considered traditional or country among Aboriginal people.

    Release date: 2013-04-17

  • Articles and reports: 89-637-X2013001
    Description:

    This fact sheet explores self-reported use of preventive screening tests for diabetes, high blood pressure, and prostate, breast and cervical cancers, as reported in the 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey. It focuses on people aged 15 and over who self-identified as Métis. The reported use of screening tests by Métis people is compared with national guidelines. Consideration is given to those with and without a regular doctor and those living in different geographical regions. Non-Aboriginal data are provided for comparison purposes when similar questions were asked on the 2008 Canadian Community Health Survey.

    Release date: 2013-03-27

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Reference (4) (4 of 4 results)

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