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All (24)

All (24) (24 of 24 results)

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114785
    Description:

    This chapter of Women in Canada explores the criminal victimization of women and girls as well as their involvement in the criminal justice system as offenders. It covers the types of criminal victimization experienced by females over time; where possible, highlighting important differences in violent crime by Aboriginal identity, immigrant status, visible minority status and age. The use of formal and informal support services is explored, including changes over time in the use of police services. This chapter also reports trends in the number and types of crimes committed by females, along with their involvement in the criminal courts and correctional systems.

    Release date: 2017-06-06

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201600114668
    Description:

    This annual Juristat article presents 2015 homicide data. Short and long-term trends in homicide are examined at the national, provincial/territorial and census metropolitan area levels. Gang-related homicides, firearm-related homicides, intimate partner homicides, and homicides committed by youth are also explored. This Juristat also presents a special analysis of the circumstances surrounding homicides of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal females committed by 'casual acquaintances' from 1980 to 2015.

    Release date: 2016-11-23

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201500114244
    Description:

    This annual Juristat article presents 2014 homicide data. Short and long-term trends in homicide are examined at the national, provincial/territorial and census metropolitan area levels. Gang-related homicides, firearm-related homicides, intimate partner homicides, and homicides committed by youth are also explored. This Juristat also presents new data on the nature and extent of homicides involving Aboriginal victims and accused persons. The year 2014 marks the first cycle of collection of Homicide Survey data for which complete information regarding Aboriginal identity has been reported for both victims and accused persons, regardless of gender.

    Release date: 2015-11-25

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201400111918
    Description:

    This Juristat bulletin provides a statistical overview of adults admitted to and released from custody and community supervision in Canada in 2011/2012. Analysis is presented at the national as well as the provincial and territorial levels. Admissions, and the characteristics of adults in the correctional system (such as age, sex and Aboriginal identity) are discussed.

    Release date: 2014-03-20

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201400111917
    Description:

    This Juristat bulletin provides a statistical overview of youth admitted to and released from custody and community services in Canada in 2011/2012. Analysis is presented at the national as well as the provincial and territorial levels. Admissions, and the characteristics of youth in the correctional system (such as age, sex and Aboriginal identity) are discussed.

    Release date: 2014-03-20

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201200111715
    Description:

    This Juristat article presents information on adults in custody and under community supervision in Canada. Short- and long-term trends are explored at both the national and provincial/territorial levels. As well, the characteristics of adults in the correctional system (such as their age, sex and Aboriginal identity) are discussed.

    Release date: 2012-10-11

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201100111439
    Description:

    This Juristat article presents information on violent victimization as reported by Aboriginal women living in the ten provinces during 2009. It analyses the characteristics associated with such incidents, including the socio-demographic characteristics of victims, offender characteristics, reporting incidents to police, consequences of victimization, and perceptions of personal safety and the criminal justice system.

    Release date: 2011-05-17

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201100111415
    Description:

    In 2009, as part of its General Social Survey program, Statistics Canada conducted a survey on victimization and public perceptions of crime and the justice system. Interviews were conducted by telephone with approximately 19,500 respondents, aged 15 and older, living in the 10 provinces. Respondents were asked about their experiences with criminal victimization. Those respondents who had been victims of a crime in the previous 12 months were asked for detailed information on each incident, including when and where it occurred; whether the incident was reported to the police; and how they were affected by the experience.This Juristat article presents information on criminal victimizations as reported by Aboriginal people living in the ten provinces during 2009, with a particular focus on violent victimizations. It analyses the characteristics associated with such incidents, including the socio-demographic risk factors, consequences of victimization, reasons for reporting (and not reporting) incidents to police and perceptions of personal safety.

    Release date: 2011-03-11

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2010020
    Description:

    This research paper focuses on police-reported crime in Inuit Nunangat. Analysis is based on police-reported crime data from the 2006 to 2008 Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey and the 2006 Census of Population. Additional data come from the Homicide Survey from 2000 to 2008. Results show that crime rates are higher in Inuit Nunangat than in the rest of Canada. The impact of socioeconomic and demographic contexts on these differences is explored. In addition, results show that crime rates are lower in communities in Inuit Nunangat where alcohol is prohibited.

    Release date: 2010-05-20

  • Table: 97-558-X2006001
    Description:

    This topic presents data on the Aboriginal peoples of Canada and their demographic characteristics. These data show the growth of the Aboriginal identity population, as well as information on age distribution, Aboriginal languages, living arrangements, housing characteristics and geographic mobility. Separate data are provided for Inuit, Métis and First Nations people.

    Release date: 2008-01-15

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2006011
    Description:

    Using recent police-reported and self-reported data, this new report provides a profile of the extent and nature of victimization and offending in Canada's territories.

    The report finds that northern residents experience higher rates of violent victimization and are more likely to be victims of spousal violence than residents in the rest of Canada. Furthermore, police-reported crime rates in the North are much higher than those in the provinces.

    The report also examines particular factors that seem to be associated with higher rates of victimization and offending. All are more common in the North. These factors include: northern residents are younger on average, than residents in the rest of Canada; the territories have higher proportions of lone-parent families and common-law families; they have higher rates of unemployment; and the territories also have higher proportions of Aboriginal residents compared to the provinces.

    Release date: 2006-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20060039199
    Description:

    Using data from victimization, police and corrections surveys, this report provides a statistical portrait of the extent and nature of victimization and offending among Aboriginal people in Canada during the past few years.

    The report finds that Aboriginal people are much more likely than non-Aboriginal people to be victims of violent crime and spousal violence. Aboriginal people are also highly overrepresented as offenders charged in police-reported homicide incidents and those admitted into the correctional system. Furthermore, crime rates are notably higher on-reserve compared to crime rates in the rest of Canada.

    The report also examines particular factors which could be related to the high levels of representation in the criminal justice system. These factors include: Aboriginal people are younger on average; their unemployment rates are higher and incomes lower; they have lower levels of educational attainment; they are more likely to live in crowded conditions; they have higher residential mobility; and Aboriginal children are more likely to be members of a lone-parent family.

    Information on Aboriginal peoples fear of crime and their perceptions of the justice system as well as their experiences with discrimination are presented, along with a description of some of the programs and services that have been developed as a response to the specialized needs of Aboriginal people in the criminal justice system.

    Release date: 2006-06-06

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20050028411
    Description:

    This Juristat examines the case histories and correctional outcomes of adults under provincial correctional supervision in Saskatchewan during the years 1999/00 through 2003/04. This is the first report analyzing data from the newly implemented Integrated Correctional Services Survey (ICSS). It provides an analysis of characteristics of persons supervised in correctional services, and a description of their involvement, any re-involvements, as well as a comparative analysis of these characteristics between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal persons. Several cohorts of persons released from supervised correctional activity in Saskatchewan are analyzed regarding their return to correctional services as well as the relationship between these re-involvements and various demographic, case history and criminal justice factors.

    Release date: 2005-06-03

  • Technical products: 85-564-X
    Description:

    This objective of this report is to present the status of national data on Aboriginal people who come into contact with the criminal justice system as offenders and victims. The report examines the current and potential collection of an individual's Aboriginal identity through various justice-related surveys at Statistics Canada, the challenges within these surveys to collect these data and provides some insight into the quality of these data. The data and sources are examined within the context of information needs for the justice and social policy sectors, and in relation to the preferred method of measuring Aboriginal Identity at Statistics Canada. Data sources examined include the Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey, the Homicide Survey, the Integrated Criminal Courts Survey, the Adult Corrections Survey, the Youth Custody and Community Services Survey, the Youth Alternative Measures Survey, the Transition Home Survey, the Victim Services Survey and the General Social Survey on Victimization. Finally, the report briefly describes efforts by other countries to improve justice-related information on their indigenous populations.

    Release date: 2005-05-10

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2001001
    Description:

    This paper outlines the experience of Aboriginal people as victims and offenders in the criminal justice system, using a mix of demographic, economic and justice data.

    Release date: 2001-06-14

  • Table: 85F0031X
    Description:

    Data on Aboriginal status contained in this report are based on self-reported (Census) and/or observational (crime) data. They provide information on the nature and extent of Aboriginal involvement in urban, rural and reserve crime as well as the socio-demographic profile of the population of Saskatchewan.

    Based on the 1996 Census data, the Aboriginal population in Saskatchewan tend to be younger, have lower educational levels, higher unemployment rates, and substantially lower incomes than the non-Aboriginal population. Crime rates on reserves were two times higher than rates in rural or urban areas of the province. For violent offences, the rate was almost five times higher on-reserve than in urban or rural areas.

    In all three areas (reserves, urban and rural areas), a larger proportion of adults than youth was accused of a violent offence or an "other" Criminal Code offence. In contrast, youth were more often accused of a property offence than any other offence type. In urban areas, there is an over-representation of Aboriginal persons involved in the criminal justice system. In 1997, more than one-half (52%) of those accused in Prince Albert, Regina and Saskatoon were Aboriginal compared to their 9% proportion in the population of these cities.

    A substantial difference in the male-female ratio of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal accused was found. Although the majority of all those accused were male, there was a greater proportion of Aboriginal female than non-Aboriginal female accused. Aboriginal accused tended to be younger than non-Aboriginal accused. Almost one-third (31%) of Aboriginal accused were aged 12 to 17 years of age compared to 23% of non-Aboriginal accused.

    In the two cities where victim data were available (Regina and Prince Albert), there was a greater proportion of Aboriginal than non-Aboriginal victims of violent crime compared to their proportion in the overall population of these cities. In 1997, 42% of victims in Prince Albert and Regina were Aboriginal, compared to their 10% proportion in the population of these cities.

    Release date: 2000-01-31

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19990058300
    Description:

    This Juristat profiles three populations of inmates: women, Aboriginal people and individuals serving life sentences. These data are based on a census of adult inmates on register in all adult correctional facilities as of midnight October 5th, 1996. Data were obtained through administrative records.

    While the general population in Canada was made up almost equally of men and women, women comprised only 5% of prisoners in correctional facilities on October 5, 1996. Female inmates tended to be in their early 30s, single, with grade 9 education or less, and unemployed at the time of admission. They were considered at lower risk to re-offend than men.

    Aboriginal people were over-represented in the prison system. Although they comprised only 2% of the general adult population, they accounted for 17% of the prison population. They were younger on average than non-Aboriginal inmates, had less education and were more likely to have been unemployed. They were also considered at higher risk to re-offend, and they had a higher set of needs than non-Aboriginal inmates (including, substance abuse, employment, personal needs and family/marital needs).

    The data also showed that as of midnight October 5th, 1996, inmates serving a life sentence comprised nearly one-fifth (18%) of the nearly 13,900 inmates in federal prisons. A person can be given a life sentence if they have been convicted of offences such as first degree or second-degree murder. Parole eligibility varies from minimum ten years served to minimum 25 years served.

    Individuals serving life sentences tended to be older and less educated than others in the prison population. The median age for lifers on snapshot day was 39, compared with 33 for other inmates. More than one-half (56%) of lifers had a grade 9 education or less, compared with 44% of other inmates.

    In addition, a majority (84%) of inmates serving life sentences were considered at high risk to re-offend, a much higher proportion than the 53% of other inmates. Not surprisingly, lifers also had a higher set of needs, that is, problem areas requiring intervention, such as personal and emotional issues, marital and family problems, attitude and problems functioning in the community.

    For more information or to enquire about the concepts, methods or data quality of this release, or to order a copy of the Juristat, contact Information and Client Services (613-951-9023 or 1-800-387-2231), Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics.

    Release date: 1999-04-22

Data (8)

Data (8) (8 of 8 results)

Analysis (15)

Analysis (15) (15 of 15 results)

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114785
    Description:

    This chapter of Women in Canada explores the criminal victimization of women and girls as well as their involvement in the criminal justice system as offenders. It covers the types of criminal victimization experienced by females over time; where possible, highlighting important differences in violent crime by Aboriginal identity, immigrant status, visible minority status and age. The use of formal and informal support services is explored, including changes over time in the use of police services. This chapter also reports trends in the number and types of crimes committed by females, along with their involvement in the criminal courts and correctional systems.

    Release date: 2017-06-06

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201600114668
    Description:

    This annual Juristat article presents 2015 homicide data. Short and long-term trends in homicide are examined at the national, provincial/territorial and census metropolitan area levels. Gang-related homicides, firearm-related homicides, intimate partner homicides, and homicides committed by youth are also explored. This Juristat also presents a special analysis of the circumstances surrounding homicides of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal females committed by 'casual acquaintances' from 1980 to 2015.

    Release date: 2016-11-23

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201500114244
    Description:

    This annual Juristat article presents 2014 homicide data. Short and long-term trends in homicide are examined at the national, provincial/territorial and census metropolitan area levels. Gang-related homicides, firearm-related homicides, intimate partner homicides, and homicides committed by youth are also explored. This Juristat also presents new data on the nature and extent of homicides involving Aboriginal victims and accused persons. The year 2014 marks the first cycle of collection of Homicide Survey data for which complete information regarding Aboriginal identity has been reported for both victims and accused persons, regardless of gender.

    Release date: 2015-11-25

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201400111918
    Description:

    This Juristat bulletin provides a statistical overview of adults admitted to and released from custody and community supervision in Canada in 2011/2012. Analysis is presented at the national as well as the provincial and territorial levels. Admissions, and the characteristics of adults in the correctional system (such as age, sex and Aboriginal identity) are discussed.

    Release date: 2014-03-20

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201400111917
    Description:

    This Juristat bulletin provides a statistical overview of youth admitted to and released from custody and community services in Canada in 2011/2012. Analysis is presented at the national as well as the provincial and territorial levels. Admissions, and the characteristics of youth in the correctional system (such as age, sex and Aboriginal identity) are discussed.

    Release date: 2014-03-20

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201200111715
    Description:

    This Juristat article presents information on adults in custody and under community supervision in Canada. Short- and long-term trends are explored at both the national and provincial/territorial levels. As well, the characteristics of adults in the correctional system (such as their age, sex and Aboriginal identity) are discussed.

    Release date: 2012-10-11

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201100111439
    Description:

    This Juristat article presents information on violent victimization as reported by Aboriginal women living in the ten provinces during 2009. It analyses the characteristics associated with such incidents, including the socio-demographic characteristics of victims, offender characteristics, reporting incidents to police, consequences of victimization, and perceptions of personal safety and the criminal justice system.

    Release date: 2011-05-17

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201100111415
    Description:

    In 2009, as part of its General Social Survey program, Statistics Canada conducted a survey on victimization and public perceptions of crime and the justice system. Interviews were conducted by telephone with approximately 19,500 respondents, aged 15 and older, living in the 10 provinces. Respondents were asked about their experiences with criminal victimization. Those respondents who had been victims of a crime in the previous 12 months were asked for detailed information on each incident, including when and where it occurred; whether the incident was reported to the police; and how they were affected by the experience.This Juristat article presents information on criminal victimizations as reported by Aboriginal people living in the ten provinces during 2009, with a particular focus on violent victimizations. It analyses the characteristics associated with such incidents, including the socio-demographic risk factors, consequences of victimization, reasons for reporting (and not reporting) incidents to police and perceptions of personal safety.

    Release date: 2011-03-11

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2010020
    Description:

    This research paper focuses on police-reported crime in Inuit Nunangat. Analysis is based on police-reported crime data from the 2006 to 2008 Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey and the 2006 Census of Population. Additional data come from the Homicide Survey from 2000 to 2008. Results show that crime rates are higher in Inuit Nunangat than in the rest of Canada. The impact of socioeconomic and demographic contexts on these differences is explored. In addition, results show that crime rates are lower in communities in Inuit Nunangat where alcohol is prohibited.

    Release date: 2010-05-20

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2006011
    Description:

    Using recent police-reported and self-reported data, this new report provides a profile of the extent and nature of victimization and offending in Canada's territories.

    The report finds that northern residents experience higher rates of violent victimization and are more likely to be victims of spousal violence than residents in the rest of Canada. Furthermore, police-reported crime rates in the North are much higher than those in the provinces.

    The report also examines particular factors that seem to be associated with higher rates of victimization and offending. All are more common in the North. These factors include: northern residents are younger on average, than residents in the rest of Canada; the territories have higher proportions of lone-parent families and common-law families; they have higher rates of unemployment; and the territories also have higher proportions of Aboriginal residents compared to the provinces.

    Release date: 2006-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20060039199
    Description:

    Using data from victimization, police and corrections surveys, this report provides a statistical portrait of the extent and nature of victimization and offending among Aboriginal people in Canada during the past few years.

    The report finds that Aboriginal people are much more likely than non-Aboriginal people to be victims of violent crime and spousal violence. Aboriginal people are also highly overrepresented as offenders charged in police-reported homicide incidents and those admitted into the correctional system. Furthermore, crime rates are notably higher on-reserve compared to crime rates in the rest of Canada.

    The report also examines particular factors which could be related to the high levels of representation in the criminal justice system. These factors include: Aboriginal people are younger on average; their unemployment rates are higher and incomes lower; they have lower levels of educational attainment; they are more likely to live in crowded conditions; they have higher residential mobility; and Aboriginal children are more likely to be members of a lone-parent family.

    Information on Aboriginal peoples fear of crime and their perceptions of the justice system as well as their experiences with discrimination are presented, along with a description of some of the programs and services that have been developed as a response to the specialized needs of Aboriginal people in the criminal justice system.

    Release date: 2006-06-06

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20050028411
    Description:

    This Juristat examines the case histories and correctional outcomes of adults under provincial correctional supervision in Saskatchewan during the years 1999/00 through 2003/04. This is the first report analyzing data from the newly implemented Integrated Correctional Services Survey (ICSS). It provides an analysis of characteristics of persons supervised in correctional services, and a description of their involvement, any re-involvements, as well as a comparative analysis of these characteristics between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal persons. Several cohorts of persons released from supervised correctional activity in Saskatchewan are analyzed regarding their return to correctional services as well as the relationship between these re-involvements and various demographic, case history and criminal justice factors.

    Release date: 2005-06-03

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2001001
    Description:

    This paper outlines the experience of Aboriginal people as victims and offenders in the criminal justice system, using a mix of demographic, economic and justice data.

    Release date: 2001-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19990058300
    Description:

    This Juristat profiles three populations of inmates: women, Aboriginal people and individuals serving life sentences. These data are based on a census of adult inmates on register in all adult correctional facilities as of midnight October 5th, 1996. Data were obtained through administrative records.

    While the general population in Canada was made up almost equally of men and women, women comprised only 5% of prisoners in correctional facilities on October 5, 1996. Female inmates tended to be in their early 30s, single, with grade 9 education or less, and unemployed at the time of admission. They were considered at lower risk to re-offend than men.

    Aboriginal people were over-represented in the prison system. Although they comprised only 2% of the general adult population, they accounted for 17% of the prison population. They were younger on average than non-Aboriginal inmates, had less education and were more likely to have been unemployed. They were also considered at higher risk to re-offend, and they had a higher set of needs than non-Aboriginal inmates (including, substance abuse, employment, personal needs and family/marital needs).

    The data also showed that as of midnight October 5th, 1996, inmates serving a life sentence comprised nearly one-fifth (18%) of the nearly 13,900 inmates in federal prisons. A person can be given a life sentence if they have been convicted of offences such as first degree or second-degree murder. Parole eligibility varies from minimum ten years served to minimum 25 years served.

    Individuals serving life sentences tended to be older and less educated than others in the prison population. The median age for lifers on snapshot day was 39, compared with 33 for other inmates. More than one-half (56%) of lifers had a grade 9 education or less, compared with 44% of other inmates.

    In addition, a majority (84%) of inmates serving life sentences were considered at high risk to re-offend, a much higher proportion than the 53% of other inmates. Not surprisingly, lifers also had a higher set of needs, that is, problem areas requiring intervention, such as personal and emotional issues, marital and family problems, attitude and problems functioning in the community.

    For more information or to enquire about the concepts, methods or data quality of this release, or to order a copy of the Juristat, contact Information and Client Services (613-951-9023 or 1-800-387-2231), Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics.

    Release date: 1999-04-22

Reference (1)

Reference (1) (1 result)

  • Technical products: 85-564-X
    Description:

    This objective of this report is to present the status of national data on Aboriginal people who come into contact with the criminal justice system as offenders and victims. The report examines the current and potential collection of an individual's Aboriginal identity through various justice-related surveys at Statistics Canada, the challenges within these surveys to collect these data and provides some insight into the quality of these data. The data and sources are examined within the context of information needs for the justice and social policy sectors, and in relation to the preferred method of measuring Aboriginal Identity at Statistics Canada. Data sources examined include the Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey, the Homicide Survey, the Integrated Criminal Courts Survey, the Adult Corrections Survey, the Youth Custody and Community Services Survey, the Youth Alternative Measures Survey, the Transition Home Survey, the Victim Services Survey and the General Social Survey on Victimization. Finally, the report briefly describes efforts by other countries to improve justice-related information on their indigenous populations.

    Release date: 2005-05-10

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