Statistics by subject – Aboriginal peoples

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All (8)

All (8) (8 of 8 results)

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X19990004854
    Description:

    As the century draws to a close, there are many topics of interest involving Canada's aboriginal peoples: self-government, land claims, the environment, the criminal justice system, urbanization, the labour market, education, etc. However, one topic receives little attention but could have a major impact on how the others will develop: the demographic growth of aboriginal populations.

    Release date: 1999-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990034788
    Description:

    This article examines the location of First Nations communities whose well-being is above average, average and below average. It then compares the living conditions of these First Nations communities with those of other Canadian communities.

    Release date: 1999-12-09

  • Journals and periodicals: 82F0076X
    Description:

    Heart disease and stroke are major causes of illness, disability and death in Canada and they exact high personal, community and health care costs. The goal of The changing face of heart disease and stroke in Canada, the fifth in a series of reports from the Canadian Heart and Stroke Surveillance System (CHSSS), is to provide health professionals and policy makers with an overview of current trends in risk factors, interventions and services, and health outcomes of heart disease and stroke in Canada.

    Release date: 1999-10-21

  • Articles and reports: 61F0019X19990035563
    Description:

    The following article was compiled and published by Industry Canada and reprinted here with permission. It is based on the Micro-Economic Monitor Special Report: "Aboriginal Entrepreneurs in Canada - Progress & Prospects", a collaboration between the Department's Micro-Economic Policy Analysis Branch and Aboriginal Business Canada program. The Report combined findings from two Statistics Canada sources: the 1996 Census of Population and the 1996 Aboriginal Business Survey (ABS). The ABS was administered to a sample of some 2,500 Aboriginal business owners from across Canada.

    Release date: 1999-09-30

  • Table: 11-516-X198300111300
    Description:

    The statistics in this section are in six main divisions: federal income security programs (series Cl-195); federal and provincial income insurance programs (series C196-286); cost-shared federal-provincial income security programs (series C287-442); federal and provincial social service programs (series C443-507); provincial-municipal income security programs (series C508-559); government expenditures on social security by broad program areas (series C560-599).

    Release date: 1999-07-29

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X1999008
    Description:

    A majority of registered indians in Canada reside in one of the approximately 900 small First Nations communities which form a 5,000 kilometre archipelago across the Canadian landscape. The purpose of this paper is to explore four questions regarding the socio-economic well-being of First Nations communities: 1) What is the current geographical pattern of socio-economic well-being of First Nations communities? 2) What do the patterns suggest about possible strategies for socio-economic development open to First Nations?

    Release date: 1999-06-16

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19990058300
    Description:

    This Juristat profiles three populations of inmates: women, Aboriginal people and individuals serving life sentences. These data are based on a census of adult inmates on register in all adult correctional facilities as of midnight October 5th, 1996. Data were obtained through administrative records.

    While the general population in Canada was made up almost equally of men and women, women comprised only 5% of prisoners in correctional facilities on October 5, 1996. Female inmates tended to be in their early 30s, single, with grade 9 education or less, and unemployed at the time of admission. They were considered at lower risk to re-offend than men.

    Aboriginal people were over-represented in the prison system. Although they comprised only 2% of the general adult population, they accounted for 17% of the prison population. They were younger on average than non-Aboriginal inmates, had less education and were more likely to have been unemployed. They were also considered at higher risk to re-offend, and they had a higher set of needs than non-Aboriginal inmates (including, substance abuse, employment, personal needs and family/marital needs).

    The data also showed that as of midnight October 5th, 1996, inmates serving a life sentence comprised nearly one-fifth (18%) of the nearly 13,900 inmates in federal prisons. A person can be given a life sentence if they have been convicted of offences such as first degree or second-degree murder. Parole eligibility varies from minimum ten years served to minimum 25 years served.

    Individuals serving life sentences tended to be older and less educated than others in the prison population. The median age for lifers on snapshot day was 39, compared with 33 for other inmates. More than one-half (56%) of lifers had a grade 9 education or less, compared with 44% of other inmates.

    In addition, a majority (84%) of inmates serving life sentences were considered at high risk to re-offend, a much higher proportion than the 53% of other inmates. Not surprisingly, lifers also had a higher set of needs, that is, problem areas requiring intervention, such as personal and emotional issues, marital and family problems, attitude and problems functioning in the community.

    For more information or to enquire about the concepts, methods or data quality of this release, or to order a copy of the Juristat, contact Information and Client Services (613-951-9023 or 1-800-387-2231), Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics.

    Release date: 1999-04-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19980044418
    Description:

    This article examines the educational achievements for young Aboriginal men and women.

    Release date: 1999-03-11

Data (1)

Data (1) (1 result)

  • Table: 11-516-X198300111300
    Description:

    The statistics in this section are in six main divisions: federal income security programs (series Cl-195); federal and provincial income insurance programs (series C196-286); cost-shared federal-provincial income security programs (series C287-442); federal and provincial social service programs (series C443-507); provincial-municipal income security programs (series C508-559); government expenditures on social security by broad program areas (series C560-599).

    Release date: 1999-07-29

Analysis (7)

Analysis (7) (7 of 7 results)

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X19990004854
    Description:

    As the century draws to a close, there are many topics of interest involving Canada's aboriginal peoples: self-government, land claims, the environment, the criminal justice system, urbanization, the labour market, education, etc. However, one topic receives little attention but could have a major impact on how the others will develop: the demographic growth of aboriginal populations.

    Release date: 1999-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990034788
    Description:

    This article examines the location of First Nations communities whose well-being is above average, average and below average. It then compares the living conditions of these First Nations communities with those of other Canadian communities.

    Release date: 1999-12-09

  • Journals and periodicals: 82F0076X
    Description:

    Heart disease and stroke are major causes of illness, disability and death in Canada and they exact high personal, community and health care costs. The goal of The changing face of heart disease and stroke in Canada, the fifth in a series of reports from the Canadian Heart and Stroke Surveillance System (CHSSS), is to provide health professionals and policy makers with an overview of current trends in risk factors, interventions and services, and health outcomes of heart disease and stroke in Canada.

    Release date: 1999-10-21

  • Articles and reports: 61F0019X19990035563
    Description:

    The following article was compiled and published by Industry Canada and reprinted here with permission. It is based on the Micro-Economic Monitor Special Report: "Aboriginal Entrepreneurs in Canada - Progress & Prospects", a collaboration between the Department's Micro-Economic Policy Analysis Branch and Aboriginal Business Canada program. The Report combined findings from two Statistics Canada sources: the 1996 Census of Population and the 1996 Aboriginal Business Survey (ABS). The ABS was administered to a sample of some 2,500 Aboriginal business owners from across Canada.

    Release date: 1999-09-30

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X1999008
    Description:

    A majority of registered indians in Canada reside in one of the approximately 900 small First Nations communities which form a 5,000 kilometre archipelago across the Canadian landscape. The purpose of this paper is to explore four questions regarding the socio-economic well-being of First Nations communities: 1) What is the current geographical pattern of socio-economic well-being of First Nations communities? 2) What do the patterns suggest about possible strategies for socio-economic development open to First Nations?

    Release date: 1999-06-16

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19990058300
    Description:

    This Juristat profiles three populations of inmates: women, Aboriginal people and individuals serving life sentences. These data are based on a census of adult inmates on register in all adult correctional facilities as of midnight October 5th, 1996. Data were obtained through administrative records.

    While the general population in Canada was made up almost equally of men and women, women comprised only 5% of prisoners in correctional facilities on October 5, 1996. Female inmates tended to be in their early 30s, single, with grade 9 education or less, and unemployed at the time of admission. They were considered at lower risk to re-offend than men.

    Aboriginal people were over-represented in the prison system. Although they comprised only 2% of the general adult population, they accounted for 17% of the prison population. They were younger on average than non-Aboriginal inmates, had less education and were more likely to have been unemployed. They were also considered at higher risk to re-offend, and they had a higher set of needs than non-Aboriginal inmates (including, substance abuse, employment, personal needs and family/marital needs).

    The data also showed that as of midnight October 5th, 1996, inmates serving a life sentence comprised nearly one-fifth (18%) of the nearly 13,900 inmates in federal prisons. A person can be given a life sentence if they have been convicted of offences such as first degree or second-degree murder. Parole eligibility varies from minimum ten years served to minimum 25 years served.

    Individuals serving life sentences tended to be older and less educated than others in the prison population. The median age for lifers on snapshot day was 39, compared with 33 for other inmates. More than one-half (56%) of lifers had a grade 9 education or less, compared with 44% of other inmates.

    In addition, a majority (84%) of inmates serving life sentences were considered at high risk to re-offend, a much higher proportion than the 53% of other inmates. Not surprisingly, lifers also had a higher set of needs, that is, problem areas requiring intervention, such as personal and emotional issues, marital and family problems, attitude and problems functioning in the community.

    For more information or to enquire about the concepts, methods or data quality of this release, or to order a copy of the Juristat, contact Information and Client Services (613-951-9023 or 1-800-387-2231), Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics.

    Release date: 1999-04-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19980044418
    Description:

    This article examines the educational achievements for young Aboriginal men and women.

    Release date: 1999-03-11

Reference (0)

Reference (0) (0 results)

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