Statistics by subject – Aboriginal peoples

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All (6) (6 of 6 results)

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2006011
    Description:

    Using recent police-reported and self-reported data, this new report provides a profile of the extent and nature of victimization and offending in Canada's territories.

    The report finds that northern residents experience higher rates of violent victimization and are more likely to be victims of spousal violence than residents in the rest of Canada. Furthermore, police-reported crime rates in the North are much higher than those in the provinces.

    The report also examines particular factors that seem to be associated with higher rates of victimization and offending. All are more common in the North. These factors include: northern residents are younger on average, than residents in the rest of Canada; the territories have higher proportions of lone-parent families and common-law families; they have higher rates of unemployment; and the territories also have higher proportions of Aboriginal residents compared to the provinces.

    Release date: 2006-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20060039199
    Description:

    Using data from victimization, police and corrections surveys, this report provides a statistical portrait of the extent and nature of victimization and offending among Aboriginal people in Canada during the past few years.

    The report finds that Aboriginal people are much more likely than non-Aboriginal people to be victims of violent crime and spousal violence. Aboriginal people are also highly overrepresented as offenders charged in police-reported homicide incidents and those admitted into the correctional system. Furthermore, crime rates are notably higher on-reserve compared to crime rates in the rest of Canada.

    The report also examines particular factors which could be related to the high levels of representation in the criminal justice system. These factors include: Aboriginal people are younger on average; their unemployment rates are higher and incomes lower; they have lower levels of educational attainment; they are more likely to live in crowded conditions; they have higher residential mobility; and Aboriginal children are more likely to be members of a lone-parent family.

    Information on Aboriginal peoples fear of crime and their perceptions of the justice system as well as their experiences with discrimination are presented, along with a description of some of the programs and services that have been developed as a response to the specialized needs of Aboriginal people in the criminal justice system.

    Release date: 2006-06-06

  • Public use microdata: 89M0021X
    Description:

    The Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS) provides data on the social and economic conditions of Aboriginal people in Canada. Its specific purpose was to identify the needs of Aboriginal people focusing on issues such as health, schooling and language. The survey was designed and implemented in partnership with national Aboriginal organizations.

    This product contains information for the Aboriginal child and youth population (under 15 years) living in off-reserve areas.

    Release date: 2006-05-25

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-618-X
    Description:

    The purpose of the provincial and territorial reports is to present a summary of demographic, social and economic characteristics of the off reserve Aboriginal population in the Atlantic provinces, Québec, Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta, British Columbia, Yukon and Northwest Territories. Information on education, residential schools, information technology, employment, mobility and housing, health and language are highlighted. While most of the focus is on adults, there is also information provided on children. Data showing comparisons between Aboriginal groups are provided, as are some comparisons with the non-Aboriginal population. Findings are based on the 2001 Census and the 2001 Aboriginal Peoples Survey.

    Release date: 2006-03-23

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-619-X
    Description:

    This report presents information on harvesting and community wellness among Inuit across the Canadian Arctic. Data come from the Arctic supplement of the 2001 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS).

    Release date: 2006-03-06

  • Public use microdata: 89M0020X
    Description:

    The Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS) provides data on the social and economic conditions of Aboriginal people in Canada. Its specific purpose was to identify the needs of Aboriginal people focusing on issues such as health, language, employment, income, schooling, housing, and mobility. The survey was designed and implemented in partnership with national Aboriginal organizations.

    This product contains information for the Aboriginal adult population (15 years and over) living in off-reserve areas.

    Release date: 2006-02-28

Data (2)

Data (2) (2 results)

Analysis (4)

Analysis (4) (4 of 4 results)

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2006011
    Description:

    Using recent police-reported and self-reported data, this new report provides a profile of the extent and nature of victimization and offending in Canada's territories.

    The report finds that northern residents experience higher rates of violent victimization and are more likely to be victims of spousal violence than residents in the rest of Canada. Furthermore, police-reported crime rates in the North are much higher than those in the provinces.

    The report also examines particular factors that seem to be associated with higher rates of victimization and offending. All are more common in the North. These factors include: northern residents are younger on average, than residents in the rest of Canada; the territories have higher proportions of lone-parent families and common-law families; they have higher rates of unemployment; and the territories also have higher proportions of Aboriginal residents compared to the provinces.

    Release date: 2006-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20060039199
    Description:

    Using data from victimization, police and corrections surveys, this report provides a statistical portrait of the extent and nature of victimization and offending among Aboriginal people in Canada during the past few years.

    The report finds that Aboriginal people are much more likely than non-Aboriginal people to be victims of violent crime and spousal violence. Aboriginal people are also highly overrepresented as offenders charged in police-reported homicide incidents and those admitted into the correctional system. Furthermore, crime rates are notably higher on-reserve compared to crime rates in the rest of Canada.

    The report also examines particular factors which could be related to the high levels of representation in the criminal justice system. These factors include: Aboriginal people are younger on average; their unemployment rates are higher and incomes lower; they have lower levels of educational attainment; they are more likely to live in crowded conditions; they have higher residential mobility; and Aboriginal children are more likely to be members of a lone-parent family.

    Information on Aboriginal peoples fear of crime and their perceptions of the justice system as well as their experiences with discrimination are presented, along with a description of some of the programs and services that have been developed as a response to the specialized needs of Aboriginal people in the criminal justice system.

    Release date: 2006-06-06

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-618-X
    Description:

    The purpose of the provincial and territorial reports is to present a summary of demographic, social and economic characteristics of the off reserve Aboriginal population in the Atlantic provinces, Québec, Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta, British Columbia, Yukon and Northwest Territories. Information on education, residential schools, information technology, employment, mobility and housing, health and language are highlighted. While most of the focus is on adults, there is also information provided on children. Data showing comparisons between Aboriginal groups are provided, as are some comparisons with the non-Aboriginal population. Findings are based on the 2001 Census and the 2001 Aboriginal Peoples Survey.

    Release date: 2006-03-23

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-619-X
    Description:

    This report presents information on harvesting and community wellness among Inuit across the Canadian Arctic. Data come from the Arctic supplement of the 2001 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS).

    Release date: 2006-03-06

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