Statistics by subject – Livestock and aquaculture

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All (14)

All (14) (14 of 14 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-627-M2017011
    Description:

    Based on the data from the 2016 Census of Agriculture, this infographic gives an overview of the livestock sector in Canada.

    Release date: 2017-05-24

  • Articles and reports: 96-325-X201400114084
    Description:

    An overview of operating expenses of Canadian livestock farms. The expenditures vary depending on the province, production method and industry type. The summary analysis makes it possible to compare the movement of expenditures for each dollar spent.

    Release date: 2014-10-28

  • Articles and reports: 96-325-X201400114027
    Description:

    The Canadian hog industry has changed greatly over the years. Data collected by the Census of Agriculture show that the industry has undergone a radical transformation. It has evolved from being an industry with a very large number of mixed farms, each possessing only a few pigs, to one with fewer large and highly specialized farms. It now plays a major role in exports and is constantly improving in terms of technology.

    Release date: 2014-07-29

  • Articles and reports: 96-325-X200700010504
    Description:

    The once scarce bison population continues to grow on Canadian farms. According to the 2006 Census of Agriculture, the bison herd, at 195,728 head, has increased 34.9% since 2001.

    Release date: 2008-01-25

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X20060029210
    Description:

    A brief overview of some agricultural events of 2005 with the goal to put into perpective this complex and changing Canadian agricultural industry - from farm gate consumer.

    Release date: 2006-06-05

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X20050058671
    Description:

    This article examines aquaculture in Canada during the past few years, as well as its place in world markets, the species that dominate our production and its importance for certain regions. The paper also examines challenges and opportunities within the industry.

    Release date: 2005-10-25

  • Articles and reports: 96-325-X20010006959
    Description:

    Milking time is no longer as simple as approaching a cow with a bucket and three-legged stool - it hasn't been so for a long time. Dairy farming has become a complex process requiring skills in business, herd management and dairy nutrition to name a few. All of this is often accomplished with only one or two people managing the farm. Technology is what helps one or two people manage dozens or hundreds of highly productive dairy cattle. It is used in all aspects of milk production, from computer-generated algorithms for designing feeding programs to laboratory testing for determining the digestibility of feed ingredients, to computer chips and databases that track milk production.

    Release date: 2004-06-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2004010
    Description:

    This article provides an update on the beef industry following the discovery of a single reported case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), or mad cow disease, on May 20, 2003. It covers data on beef exports, imports, production, live stocks, etc. In addition, the article compares farm prices for cattle with retail beef prices.

    Release date: 2004-02-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2003005
    Description:

    This paper examines Canada's beef exports and imports throughout the early days of the beef export ban that came into effect on May 20, 2003. The Canadian beef export market was worth about $4.1 billion in 2002. These exports dropped to virtually zero in June, July and August after the implementation of a worldwide ban on Canadian beef products following the discovery of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) - more commonly known as mad cow disease - in a single cow. Canadian beef imports increased above historical levels in June before dropping in July and August. Canadian beef imports have not been trivial: they accounted for about $900 million in 2002 or almost 30% of the beef and veal consumed in Canada.

    Release date: 2003-11-05

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X20030096514
    Description:

    Over the last few years, the rapid expansion of large livestock operations has fuelled heated debates in many rural communities across Canada. Proposals for new hog operations, among others, have encountered vocal opposition from neighbours and residents in the community. Promoters defended the economic value of their project claiming that good farming practices and improved technology minimizes the potential risk of nuisance and pollution. However, opponents raised concerns about the reduction of their quality of life in association with large livestock operations, especially hog farms. They fear being driven out of their homes by strong odours or worry about accidental contamination of ground water in surrounding areas, as in Walkerton, Ontario. Still others are upset by prospects of added truck traffic, dust and noise resulting from feed and livestock transportation.

    Release date: 2003-10-22

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X20021036174
    Description:

    Crop production across western Canada was lower in 2001 as a result of drought conditions. The grains industry has been drawing comparisons with the 1988 season, the last year a general drought reduced production. There are differences between the drought of 2001 and the drought of 1988. This article will examine some of these differences.

    Release date: 2002-03-28

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X20010035613
    Description:

    The most widely discussed agricultural topic in recent years is the risks and opportunities presented by food products obtained through biotechnology, especially those derived from genetically modified seeds (GMS). According to the June 2000 survey on field crops, 16% of all soybean acreage in Quebec, and 18% of that in Ontario, was planted with genetically modified seeds. The percentage of corn in both provinces was 27%. Most farms using GMS corn and soybeans are located in Ontario and Quebec where the production of both of these crops is concentrated.

    Release date: 2001-03-29

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X20010035612
    Description:

    This article gives a "snapshot" of where the larger concentrations of livestock were in May 1996. This information would be useful to planners, investors, non-governmental organizations, rural communities, and governments. This could help them decide where to expand livestock production without putting the environment at risk.

    Release date: 2001-03-29

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X19990094725
    Description:

    The development of aquaculture parallels the transition that occured in agriculture several thousand years ago. Agriculture appeared when hunters and gatherers began to raise livestock and plant crops to produce food. The parallel transition with aquatic species is becoming an important activity in the Canadian economy. As a result of new initiatives, Statistics Canada is now able to provide economic data for the developing industry of aquaculture.

    Release date: 1999-10-06

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Analysis (14)

Analysis (14) (14 of 14 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-627-M2017011
    Description:

    Based on the data from the 2016 Census of Agriculture, this infographic gives an overview of the livestock sector in Canada.

    Release date: 2017-05-24

  • Articles and reports: 96-325-X201400114084
    Description:

    An overview of operating expenses of Canadian livestock farms. The expenditures vary depending on the province, production method and industry type. The summary analysis makes it possible to compare the movement of expenditures for each dollar spent.

    Release date: 2014-10-28

  • Articles and reports: 96-325-X201400114027
    Description:

    The Canadian hog industry has changed greatly over the years. Data collected by the Census of Agriculture show that the industry has undergone a radical transformation. It has evolved from being an industry with a very large number of mixed farms, each possessing only a few pigs, to one with fewer large and highly specialized farms. It now plays a major role in exports and is constantly improving in terms of technology.

    Release date: 2014-07-29

  • Articles and reports: 96-325-X200700010504
    Description:

    The once scarce bison population continues to grow on Canadian farms. According to the 2006 Census of Agriculture, the bison herd, at 195,728 head, has increased 34.9% since 2001.

    Release date: 2008-01-25

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X20060029210
    Description:

    A brief overview of some agricultural events of 2005 with the goal to put into perpective this complex and changing Canadian agricultural industry - from farm gate consumer.

    Release date: 2006-06-05

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X20050058671
    Description:

    This article examines aquaculture in Canada during the past few years, as well as its place in world markets, the species that dominate our production and its importance for certain regions. The paper also examines challenges and opportunities within the industry.

    Release date: 2005-10-25

  • Articles and reports: 96-325-X20010006959
    Description:

    Milking time is no longer as simple as approaching a cow with a bucket and three-legged stool - it hasn't been so for a long time. Dairy farming has become a complex process requiring skills in business, herd management and dairy nutrition to name a few. All of this is often accomplished with only one or two people managing the farm. Technology is what helps one or two people manage dozens or hundreds of highly productive dairy cattle. It is used in all aspects of milk production, from computer-generated algorithms for designing feeding programs to laboratory testing for determining the digestibility of feed ingredients, to computer chips and databases that track milk production.

    Release date: 2004-06-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2004010
    Description:

    This article provides an update on the beef industry following the discovery of a single reported case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), or mad cow disease, on May 20, 2003. It covers data on beef exports, imports, production, live stocks, etc. In addition, the article compares farm prices for cattle with retail beef prices.

    Release date: 2004-02-18

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2003005
    Description:

    This paper examines Canada's beef exports and imports throughout the early days of the beef export ban that came into effect on May 20, 2003. The Canadian beef export market was worth about $4.1 billion in 2002. These exports dropped to virtually zero in June, July and August after the implementation of a worldwide ban on Canadian beef products following the discovery of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) - more commonly known as mad cow disease - in a single cow. Canadian beef imports increased above historical levels in June before dropping in July and August. Canadian beef imports have not been trivial: they accounted for about $900 million in 2002 or almost 30% of the beef and veal consumed in Canada.

    Release date: 2003-11-05

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X20030096514
    Description:

    Over the last few years, the rapid expansion of large livestock operations has fuelled heated debates in many rural communities across Canada. Proposals for new hog operations, among others, have encountered vocal opposition from neighbours and residents in the community. Promoters defended the economic value of their project claiming that good farming practices and improved technology minimizes the potential risk of nuisance and pollution. However, opponents raised concerns about the reduction of their quality of life in association with large livestock operations, especially hog farms. They fear being driven out of their homes by strong odours or worry about accidental contamination of ground water in surrounding areas, as in Walkerton, Ontario. Still others are upset by prospects of added truck traffic, dust and noise resulting from feed and livestock transportation.

    Release date: 2003-10-22

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X20021036174
    Description:

    Crop production across western Canada was lower in 2001 as a result of drought conditions. The grains industry has been drawing comparisons with the 1988 season, the last year a general drought reduced production. There are differences between the drought of 2001 and the drought of 1988. This article will examine some of these differences.

    Release date: 2002-03-28

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X20010035613
    Description:

    The most widely discussed agricultural topic in recent years is the risks and opportunities presented by food products obtained through biotechnology, especially those derived from genetically modified seeds (GMS). According to the June 2000 survey on field crops, 16% of all soybean acreage in Quebec, and 18% of that in Ontario, was planted with genetically modified seeds. The percentage of corn in both provinces was 27%. Most farms using GMS corn and soybeans are located in Ontario and Quebec where the production of both of these crops is concentrated.

    Release date: 2001-03-29

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X20010035612
    Description:

    This article gives a "snapshot" of where the larger concentrations of livestock were in May 1996. This information would be useful to planners, investors, non-governmental organizations, rural communities, and governments. This could help them decide where to expand livestock production without putting the environment at risk.

    Release date: 2001-03-29

  • Articles and reports: 21-004-X19990094725
    Description:

    The development of aquaculture parallels the transition that occured in agriculture several thousand years ago. Agriculture appeared when hunters and gatherers began to raise livestock and plant crops to produce food. The parallel transition with aquatic species is becoming an important activity in the Canadian economy. As a result of new initiatives, Statistics Canada is now able to provide economic data for the developing industry of aquaculture.

    Release date: 1999-10-06

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