Statistics by subject – Business, consumer and property services

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  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050028015
    Description:

    Canada has been a connected nation for many years. The penetration of basic telephone service and of cable services have been and remain amongst the highest in the world. The networks most used by Canadians are the wireline telephone network, the cable television network, the wireless telephone network, the Internet, and the satellite and MDS television networks. This article highlights the amazing speed at which connectivity is evolving.

    Release date: 2005-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20050028014
    Description:

    It is difficult to imagine, particularly for younger Canadians, that mobile telecommunications devices were a curiosity only 20 years ago. In fact, mobile communications were not that common as recently as 10 years ago when less than 2 million devices were connected to our wireless networks. While the rate of adoption of the Internet in Canada is one of the highest in the world and the rate of adoption of satellite television is showing signs of a slowdown, there still seems to be considerable potential for growth in the wireless telecommunications industry.

    Release date: 2005-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200510513142
    Description:

    Call centres are believed to be largely responsible for the phenomenal growth of the business support services industry over the past two decades. The Labour Force Survey is used to profile call-centre workers and to substantiate or disprove some commonly held perceptions.

    Release date: 2005-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040037431
    Description:

    This article describes the continued resiliency of the radio industry, which has survived television as well as personal stereos such as the Sony Walkman and MP3 players.

    Release date: 2004-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040016795
    Description:

    From the early 1950s to the mid-1990s, cable companies were the only businesses offering multi-channel video services, and these services represented much of their revenues. The penetration of cable services grew steadily over the period and peaked in the early 1990s. The introduction of competition from wireless operators has given new life to the industry and its clientele has expanded by more than 20% from 1997 to 2002. Wireless operator companies, which had virtually no customers in 1997, have captured a substantial share of the multi-channel video market. Cable operators have diversified and now play a major role in the Internet access market. Digital technology is gradually displacing analogue technologies.

    Release date: 2004-03-05

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030036653
    Description:

    Information and communication technologies (ICTs) are changing the way individuals and organizations access, exchange and use information. The Internet puts a wealth of information and entertainment at its users' fingertips, wireless technologies allow communication and information exchange from almost anywhere at any time, and broadband networks pave the way for applications unheard of only a few years ago. This article looks at some of the fundamental changes that have affected the cable industry in the recent past and examines some of the challenges and opportunities it faces in coming years.

    Release date: 2003-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030036658
    Description:

    The expansion of the Canadian television broadcasting industry continued in 2002 with the launch of 47 digital channels. This explosion happened at a time when growth in the advertising market was sluggish, leaving broadcasters fighting for available advertising dollars and struggling to maintain profit margins.

    Release date: 2003-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030036657
    Description:

    Radio, the oldest electronic medium, is steadily generating profits. Revenues rose 2.7%, reaching over $1.1 billion. The performance of FM stations in recent years is at the root of the sustained level of profits for the radio industry.

    Release date: 2003-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20030016470
    Description:

    Wireless operators (satellite and multipoint distribution systems) had captured 17.0% of the video programming delivery market at the end of August 2001, up significantly from 10.8% in 2000, and more than double the level of about 6.5% in 1999.

    Release date: 2003-02-18

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020036377
    Description:

    After several difficult years, radio is making a comeback. Total revenues in the radio industry reached over $1 billion. This increase is partly explained by the launch of new stations, but mainly due to FM broadcasting, with 71% of the industry revenues coming from the FM sector.

    Release date: 2002-11-01

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020036382
    Description:

    The increased penetration of direct-to-home satellite services and digital cable has had a profound impact on revenues, profits and employment in the Canadian television industry. Speciality television services reported revenues of $1.2 billion in 2001; a striking increase of almost 14% from 2000.

    Release date: 2002-11-01

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20020036380
    Description:

    Despite the increased availability of high speed Internet by cable, there continues to be a significant lack of access in smaller communities in Canada. More than 70% of cable homes (homes with access to cable) in small communities did not have access to high-speed Internet by cable in 2001.

    Release date: 2002-11-01

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20010035969
    Description:

    For many years, the cable industry comprised territorial monopolies providing their customers with basic television programming services in a regulated environment. Learn how this situation has evolved in the last few years.

    Release date: 2001-10-31

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