Statistics by subject – Business, consumer and property services

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All (3)

All (3) (3 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20040016664
    Description:

    Services constitute the single most important industry in Canada's economy, with 68% of total gross domestic product, 75% of employment and 53% of consumer spending. However, this industry is not widely perceived as being Canada's spearhead of research and development (R&D), a role more traditionally assigned to the manufacturing sector. Still, services are becoming an increasingly important force in R&D, which is why we should reconsider the true role played by R&D in the service sector. This article, in fact, sets out to quantify R&D activities within the service sector.

    Highlights of this exploratory study

    - In 2002, the commercial service sector was responsible for 28.5% of all R&D expenditures for the economy as a whole.- In 2000, 36.6% of all personnel assigned full time to R&D worked in the commercial service sector. - Quantification of the amounts spent on R&D from within the service sector does not necessarily correspond to traditional industrial classifications. For example, R&D is primarily performed in such sectors as biotechnology, software, telecommunications, the environment and logistics, which are not included in the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) classification scheme.- Several service sector activities are very labour intensive and require highly skilled R&D workers. For example, of all employees performing R&D in the field of biotechnology, 23% hold doctorates or master's degrees.

    Footnote: Commercial services include supply services (transportation, warehousing and trade), communications, finance, real estate, and insurance and business services (information systems, consultation, scientific research, etc.).

    Release date: 2004-01-22

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X20000045614
    Description:

    This article provides insights into the dynamics of trade in services in an increasingly globalized and open world economy, particularly with respect to Canada. The main objective is to provide a statistical review of trade in services for Canada and some other G-7 countries.

    Release date: 2001-04-19

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X20000035460
    Description:

    The main objective of this article is to provide a better understanding of Canada's funeral services industry and how it fared in the 1990's. The article will examine the industry's performance, cost structure and some characteristics of its workforce.

    Release date: 2001-01-17

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Analysis (3)

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  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20040016664
    Description:

    Services constitute the single most important industry in Canada's economy, with 68% of total gross domestic product, 75% of employment and 53% of consumer spending. However, this industry is not widely perceived as being Canada's spearhead of research and development (R&D), a role more traditionally assigned to the manufacturing sector. Still, services are becoming an increasingly important force in R&D, which is why we should reconsider the true role played by R&D in the service sector. This article, in fact, sets out to quantify R&D activities within the service sector.

    Highlights of this exploratory study

    - In 2002, the commercial service sector was responsible for 28.5% of all R&D expenditures for the economy as a whole.- In 2000, 36.6% of all personnel assigned full time to R&D worked in the commercial service sector. - Quantification of the amounts spent on R&D from within the service sector does not necessarily correspond to traditional industrial classifications. For example, R&D is primarily performed in such sectors as biotechnology, software, telecommunications, the environment and logistics, which are not included in the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) classification scheme.- Several service sector activities are very labour intensive and require highly skilled R&D workers. For example, of all employees performing R&D in the field of biotechnology, 23% hold doctorates or master's degrees.

    Footnote: Commercial services include supply services (transportation, warehousing and trade), communications, finance, real estate, and insurance and business services (information systems, consultation, scientific research, etc.).

    Release date: 2004-01-22

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X20000045614
    Description:

    This article provides insights into the dynamics of trade in services in an increasingly globalized and open world economy, particularly with respect to Canada. The main objective is to provide a statistical review of trade in services for Canada and some other G-7 countries.

    Release date: 2001-04-19

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X20000035460
    Description:

    The main objective of this article is to provide a better understanding of Canada's funeral services industry and how it fared in the 1990's. The article will examine the industry's performance, cost structure and some characteristics of its workforce.

    Release date: 2001-01-17

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