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All (17) (17 of 17 results)

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1998020
    Description:

    Leasing, rather than buying, is increasingly becoming an attractive option for both consumers and businesses. This article looks at the industries that rent or lease: automobiles and trucks; and machinery and equipment. In some instances, the focus turns to the sub-industries comprising these broader industry groups. The article quantitatively examines the industries' financial performances, and employment, remuneration, and output levels from 1991 to 1995. Also examined is the effect of firm size on outcomes in these industries.

    Release date: 1998-12-16

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1995002
    Description:

    This paper is the second of a two-part series on business services and their role in the Canadian economy. It provides a detailed industrial and geographical profile of employment, illustrates its composition and major characteristics and analyzes its sources of growth by type, gender, occupation, education and other features.

    Business services is a dynamic sector with impressive employment growth, considerably higher than the economy average. Growth has been particularly strong in self-employment, part-time and female employment. Much of the growth in employment originates in the computer services industry. The proportion of managerial and professional positions has been growing relative to clerical ones. Employment is heavily concentrated in urban centres. Individuals employed in these industries are better educated and better paid than the average worker.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1998015
    Description:

    This brief paper looks at how the services sector fared during the 1981/82 and 1990/92 recessions, offering insights into how the sector could be affected in the event of another recession. It examines recession-period changes in the sector's gross domestic product (GDP), employment patterns and workforce remuneration, compared to those in the rest of the economy. The article concludes that during recessions, these indicators of economic health declined less for services than for the rest of the economy, suggesting that recessions have relatively less impact on the services sector.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1995003
    Description:

    The funeral services industry touches, inevitably, on everyone's life. In Canada, this is reflected to a great degree by aspects of the industry's economic performance, as well as by the numerous regulations regarding public health and consumer protection. This paper draws from a number of sources to offer a wide-ranging picture of the industry and an outlook toward its future.The paper begins with an outline of the regulatory environment within which the Canadian funeral services industry operates. It then analyses its financial structure.

    The industry is characterized by above-average profitability and revenue growth, as well as by low rates of exit and entry and rather limited concentration. The section on industry prices illustrates the potential for deriving average funeral costs from aggregate industry data. This is followed by a brief exposition of market demand, which in this industry's context, is measured by the number of deaths. Demographic projections conclusively point to a robust economic outlook for funeral services, particularly in light of the ageing of the Canadian population.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1998016
    Description:

    This article looks at the rapid growth of the architectural, engineering and other scientific and technical services (AES) industry and, when possible, its three sub-industries, from 1982 to 1994. Industry growth, employment and remuneration patterns are compared to those in the overall Canadian economy. The article also examines characteristics of the AES industry's workforce, particularly the employees' education qualifications, occupations and demographic characteristics.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1998017
    Description:

    This article describes and quantifies the growth of Canada's dynamic software and computer services industry in the 1990s. Results show that the industry's ouput has doubled in the 1990s, and that its workforce's size and remuneration levels also grew rapidly. The article explores the industry's three largest growth areas (professional services, data processing services and software products development) and offers insights into why these areas are growing. Also examined are international policy developments affecting the industry, including the Voorburg Group and recent trade agreements. The article also discusses the new North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS) and how it will improve statistical measurements of this, and other, service industries.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1998014
    Description:

    This article utilizes information on business startups and closures to examine change and volatility in the service economy. Industries on the cutting edge of technology experience more volatility and are also the fastest growing. Many firms enter the business services and communication industries to seize opportunities offered by technological advances but many are also forced out by the stiff competition. The information-intensive industries (software developers and advertising services firms) are almost twice as volatile as the knowledge-based industries. The latter have low business entry and exit rates because the amount of human capital required to set up a professional practice is large and takes years to acquire.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1998018
    Description:

    The logistics services industry, an emerging component of the services sector, strives to ensure an efficient flow of products through the supply chain. Logistics services have grown in importance with deregulation, technological change, and the greater integration of production and distribution across national boundaries. This article looks at how these factors affected the evolution of logistics services. It also discusses the challenges associated with statistically measuring the emerging logistics services industry.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1997010
    Description:

    Temporary help is an integral part of the workforce strategy of many businesses. Temporary help workers may be on the payroll of the organization where they work or they may be employees of the firms in personnel supplier industry, placed in the organization under contract.

    The study is an analysis of the personnel supplier industry, commonly known as the temporary help industry. The paper begins with a discussion of the special nature of the industry's product. The role of temporary help in the labour market is compared to just-in-time inventory technology in material handling and bridge financing in the financial markets. It then analyzes the industry's structure in terms of occupations and skill levels, degree of specialization and its determinants, competition at the industry and product levels, major markets and trade. Finally, the growth and cycles in the industry are analyzed in terms of the business demographics, highlighting the effect of firm size and vintage.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1995001
    Description:

    The significance of business services in the economy and their role in fostering competitiveness has attracted considerable attention in recent years. This paper, the first of a two-part series, examines the evolution of business services in Canada over the last three decades. It draws a demographic profile of this group from an industrial and a geographical perspective, and analyzes its size, structure, output and growth, R & D involvement as well as the sources of demand and supply of business service commodities.

    The industrial group is made up of a large number of small firms that produce services to be used primarily as intermediate inputs in the production processes of other industries. Business services industries are labour intensive with high value-added and are predominantly located in metropolitan areas. Their growth has outpaced the economy average by a huge margin. Despite the high level of exports, increasing deficits characterize international trade in business service commodities. Business services account for a significant proportion of R & D performed in Canada. They are not immune to economic downturns.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1998019
    Description:

    This paper demonstrates the extent to which jobs are simultaneously created and eliminated in service industries. This job reallocation tends to be higher in knowledge- and information-intensive industries such as business services. However, job reallocation patterns are not necessarily similar across all dynamic industries. This is largely because of differences between various industries': markets; regulatory environments; and abilities to absorb displaced workers into the production of new goods and services. The study further illustrates that high job reallocation causes significant movement of workers between firms and industries, and that this has important implications for training and knowledge flows in the economy.

    Release date: 1998-10-28

  • Table: 56-001-X19980025195
    Description:

    Total broadcasting revenue of the private sector was $2,574.9 million compared to $2,391.6 million in 1996, an increase of 7.7%. Total expenses for private stations which include departmental, depreciation and interest expenses increased 3.4% to $2,337.4 million from $2,261.0 million in 1996.

    Release date: 1998-07-14

  • Articles and reports: 87-003-X19980033852
    Description:

    The signs are all around us ... from coffee mugs boasting that "There is life after 50" to the popularity of golf to the growing number of adult lifestyle communities: Canada's population is getting older. The aging of the baby boom generation is largely responsible for this trend, coupled with historically low fertility and mortality rates. The baby boom generation has established trends in the marketplace as they have proceeded along the demographic trail. Tourism is no exception. Almost four out of every ten Canadians travelling within Canada were baby boomers in 1996 and they spent 53% of the total domestic expenditures. This article explore how this demographic cohort is influencing many current domestic travel trends and how these may shift in the future based on the travel behaviour of older age groups.

    Release date: 1998-07-13

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X19980013843
    Description:

    Leasing, rather than buying, is increasingly becoming an attractive option for both consumers and businesses in today's economy. This article examines recent leasing services activities in Canada by focusing on two major industry groups: automobile and truck rental and leasing services. Also analyzed are each industry group's structure, characteristics and performance, with an emphasis on the 1991-95 period. In some instances, attention is focused on sub-industries within each broad industry group.

    Release date: 1998-07-10

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X19980013844
    Description:

    This brief descriptive article takes a glance at changes in the output levels for various major service industry groups and some specific service industries within these groups. The major service industry groups to be examined here include: communications; finance, insurance and real estate; business services; traveler accommodation and food services; and leisure and personal services. These are the same industry groupings for which quarterly data are regularly presented in the latter half of this publication.

    Release date: 1998-07-10

  • Table: 56-001-X19980015196
    Description:

    Through a special survey of cellular service providers, Statistics Canada has compiled the first comprehensive statistical record of the cellular telephone industry's development between 1987 and 1996. The data quantify the growth and financial performance of the industry.

    Release date: 1998-04-15

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X19970043663
    Description:

    Beginning with this issue, Service Indicators is expanding its coverage of the services industries to include the amusement and recreation services industries and the personal and houshold services industries. This brief article investigates how the amusement and recreation services industry has fared since 1992, by examining its employment, remuneration and output data.

    Release date: 1998-04-15

Data (2)

Data (2) (2 results)

Analysis (15)

Analysis (15) (15 of 15 results)

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1998020
    Description:

    Leasing, rather than buying, is increasingly becoming an attractive option for both consumers and businesses. This article looks at the industries that rent or lease: automobiles and trucks; and machinery and equipment. In some instances, the focus turns to the sub-industries comprising these broader industry groups. The article quantitatively examines the industries' financial performances, and employment, remuneration, and output levels from 1991 to 1995. Also examined is the effect of firm size on outcomes in these industries.

    Release date: 1998-12-16

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1995002
    Description:

    This paper is the second of a two-part series on business services and their role in the Canadian economy. It provides a detailed industrial and geographical profile of employment, illustrates its composition and major characteristics and analyzes its sources of growth by type, gender, occupation, education and other features.

    Business services is a dynamic sector with impressive employment growth, considerably higher than the economy average. Growth has been particularly strong in self-employment, part-time and female employment. Much of the growth in employment originates in the computer services industry. The proportion of managerial and professional positions has been growing relative to clerical ones. Employment is heavily concentrated in urban centres. Individuals employed in these industries are better educated and better paid than the average worker.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1998015
    Description:

    This brief paper looks at how the services sector fared during the 1981/82 and 1990/92 recessions, offering insights into how the sector could be affected in the event of another recession. It examines recession-period changes in the sector's gross domestic product (GDP), employment patterns and workforce remuneration, compared to those in the rest of the economy. The article concludes that during recessions, these indicators of economic health declined less for services than for the rest of the economy, suggesting that recessions have relatively less impact on the services sector.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1995003
    Description:

    The funeral services industry touches, inevitably, on everyone's life. In Canada, this is reflected to a great degree by aspects of the industry's economic performance, as well as by the numerous regulations regarding public health and consumer protection. This paper draws from a number of sources to offer a wide-ranging picture of the industry and an outlook toward its future.The paper begins with an outline of the regulatory environment within which the Canadian funeral services industry operates. It then analyses its financial structure.

    The industry is characterized by above-average profitability and revenue growth, as well as by low rates of exit and entry and rather limited concentration. The section on industry prices illustrates the potential for deriving average funeral costs from aggregate industry data. This is followed by a brief exposition of market demand, which in this industry's context, is measured by the number of deaths. Demographic projections conclusively point to a robust economic outlook for funeral services, particularly in light of the ageing of the Canadian population.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1998016
    Description:

    This article looks at the rapid growth of the architectural, engineering and other scientific and technical services (AES) industry and, when possible, its three sub-industries, from 1982 to 1994. Industry growth, employment and remuneration patterns are compared to those in the overall Canadian economy. The article also examines characteristics of the AES industry's workforce, particularly the employees' education qualifications, occupations and demographic characteristics.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1998017
    Description:

    This article describes and quantifies the growth of Canada's dynamic software and computer services industry in the 1990s. Results show that the industry's ouput has doubled in the 1990s, and that its workforce's size and remuneration levels also grew rapidly. The article explores the industry's three largest growth areas (professional services, data processing services and software products development) and offers insights into why these areas are growing. Also examined are international policy developments affecting the industry, including the Voorburg Group and recent trade agreements. The article also discusses the new North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS) and how it will improve statistical measurements of this, and other, service industries.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1998014
    Description:

    This article utilizes information on business startups and closures to examine change and volatility in the service economy. Industries on the cutting edge of technology experience more volatility and are also the fastest growing. Many firms enter the business services and communication industries to seize opportunities offered by technological advances but many are also forced out by the stiff competition. The information-intensive industries (software developers and advertising services firms) are almost twice as volatile as the knowledge-based industries. The latter have low business entry and exit rates because the amount of human capital required to set up a professional practice is large and takes years to acquire.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1998018
    Description:

    The logistics services industry, an emerging component of the services sector, strives to ensure an efficient flow of products through the supply chain. Logistics services have grown in importance with deregulation, technological change, and the greater integration of production and distribution across national boundaries. This article looks at how these factors affected the evolution of logistics services. It also discusses the challenges associated with statistically measuring the emerging logistics services industry.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1997010
    Description:

    Temporary help is an integral part of the workforce strategy of many businesses. Temporary help workers may be on the payroll of the organization where they work or they may be employees of the firms in personnel supplier industry, placed in the organization under contract.

    The study is an analysis of the personnel supplier industry, commonly known as the temporary help industry. The paper begins with a discussion of the special nature of the industry's product. The role of temporary help in the labour market is compared to just-in-time inventory technology in material handling and bridge financing in the financial markets. It then analyzes the industry's structure in terms of occupations and skill levels, degree of specialization and its determinants, competition at the industry and product levels, major markets and trade. Finally, the growth and cycles in the industry are analyzed in terms of the business demographics, highlighting the effect of firm size and vintage.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1995001
    Description:

    The significance of business services in the economy and their role in fostering competitiveness has attracted considerable attention in recent years. This paper, the first of a two-part series, examines the evolution of business services in Canada over the last three decades. It draws a demographic profile of this group from an industrial and a geographical perspective, and analyzes its size, structure, output and growth, R & D involvement as well as the sources of demand and supply of business service commodities.

    The industrial group is made up of a large number of small firms that produce services to be used primarily as intermediate inputs in the production processes of other industries. Business services industries are labour intensive with high value-added and are predominantly located in metropolitan areas. Their growth has outpaced the economy average by a huge margin. Despite the high level of exports, increasing deficits characterize international trade in business service commodities. Business services account for a significant proportion of R & D performed in Canada. They are not immune to economic downturns.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1998019
    Description:

    This paper demonstrates the extent to which jobs are simultaneously created and eliminated in service industries. This job reallocation tends to be higher in knowledge- and information-intensive industries such as business services. However, job reallocation patterns are not necessarily similar across all dynamic industries. This is largely because of differences between various industries': markets; regulatory environments; and abilities to absorb displaced workers into the production of new goods and services. The study further illustrates that high job reallocation causes significant movement of workers between firms and industries, and that this has important implications for training and knowledge flows in the economy.

    Release date: 1998-10-28

  • Articles and reports: 87-003-X19980033852
    Description:

    The signs are all around us ... from coffee mugs boasting that "There is life after 50" to the popularity of golf to the growing number of adult lifestyle communities: Canada's population is getting older. The aging of the baby boom generation is largely responsible for this trend, coupled with historically low fertility and mortality rates. The baby boom generation has established trends in the marketplace as they have proceeded along the demographic trail. Tourism is no exception. Almost four out of every ten Canadians travelling within Canada were baby boomers in 1996 and they spent 53% of the total domestic expenditures. This article explore how this demographic cohort is influencing many current domestic travel trends and how these may shift in the future based on the travel behaviour of older age groups.

    Release date: 1998-07-13

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X19980013843
    Description:

    Leasing, rather than buying, is increasingly becoming an attractive option for both consumers and businesses in today's economy. This article examines recent leasing services activities in Canada by focusing on two major industry groups: automobile and truck rental and leasing services. Also analyzed are each industry group's structure, characteristics and performance, with an emphasis on the 1991-95 period. In some instances, attention is focused on sub-industries within each broad industry group.

    Release date: 1998-07-10

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X19980013844
    Description:

    This brief descriptive article takes a glance at changes in the output levels for various major service industry groups and some specific service industries within these groups. The major service industry groups to be examined here include: communications; finance, insurance and real estate; business services; traveler accommodation and food services; and leisure and personal services. These are the same industry groupings for which quarterly data are regularly presented in the latter half of this publication.

    Release date: 1998-07-10

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X19970043663
    Description:

    Beginning with this issue, Service Indicators is expanding its coverage of the services industries to include the amusement and recreation services industries and the personal and houshold services industries. This brief article investigates how the amusement and recreation services industry has fared since 1992, by examining its employment, remuneration and output data.

    Release date: 1998-04-15

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