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All (16)

All (16) (16 of 16 results)

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1999027
    Description:

    Computer communications occur when someone connects a computer to a communications network to access information on the Internet, to send and receive e-mail, or to use electronic banking services. This article uses 1998 data to update previous estimates of the proportion of Canadian households regularly using computer communications, analyzing the relationships between usage and location of use, household income, and other demographic factors. The article also looks at the growth of household connectedness over the past year, as well as the time spent using computer communications from home for a variety of services that can be accessed through the Internet.

    Release date: 1999-12-24

  • Articles and reports: 87-403-X19970014747
    Description:

    This chapter describes four specific industry sectors : accomodation services, restaurant services, travel agencies and tour operators, and Canadian tourist attractions.

    Release date: 1999-11-24

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1999026
    Description:

    Growth in the gambling industries has continued to outstrip that of most industries. Gambling has brought such economic benefits as increased revenues and employment to many regions. Although some communities have not embraced the arrival of casinos and video lottery terminals, most households in Canada do participate in and spend money on some form of gambling activity. This article presents a statistical portrait of Canada's gambling industry. It examines the economic output, jobs, and government revenues generated by the gambling industry, and also provides provincial comparisons.

    Release date: 1999-09-03

  • Table: 56-001-X19990025192
    Description:

    This report is an advance of selected data from the 1997 Annual Survey of Telecommunications Service Providers. This newly redesigned survey serves to measure the telecommunications industry's financial performance as well as aspects of network infrastructure and connectedness.

    Release date: 1999-08-20

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1999025
    Description:

    Both personal and business travel have seasonal patterns that lead to variations in the demand for hotels, motels and other accommodation services. This article examines seasonal fluctuations experienced by Canada's traveller accommodation industry in 1996. It then focuses on monthly variations in hotel and motel occupancy rates according to such factors as location, establishment size and market orientation. The summary measures yielded by this study also offer useful benchmarks against which individual hotels and motels can compare their own room utilization figures.

    Release date: 1999-08-09

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X19990014628
    Description:

    Foreign ownership in telecommunications - always a sensitive issue for Canada - is likely to become even more important for policymakers to follow in the future, as globalization leads to increased competition. A new paper from Statistics Canada sheds light on the make-up of the industry, comparing the performance of foreign-and-Canadian-controlled firms.

    Release date: 1999-07-23

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X19990014627
    Description:

    Twenty years ago, it was rare for a university to patent an invention, create a spin-off company or license a technology - the priority was to "publish or perish." But according to the results of a new pilot survey, the catch phrase might well become "patent or publish". In 1997-98, Canada's universities registered 143 new patents and licensed 243 technologies, bringing in almost $16 million in royalties.

    Release date: 1999-07-23

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X19990014621
    Description:

    This paper will look at challenges facing ISPs today including barriers to growth, competing in the Internet sector, complaints and practices regarding offensive content and conduct, as well as ISPs' perceptions of what is important to customers. These issues will be analysed after classifying ISPs into four different size categories, based on ISP revenue. This will enable one to see any differences in perception or conduct between ISPs of varying sizes.

    Release date: 1999-07-15

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X19990014622
    Description:

    The North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS) is being adopted by Statistics Canada to replace the 1980 Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system used during the past two decades. The impetus behind NAICS was the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and the resultant need for the three signatories (Canada, the United States and Mexico) to have a statistical framework enabling industrial statistics to be collected, analyzed and disseminated in a consistent manner by all three countries on an industry-by-industry basis.

    Release date: 1999-07-15

  • Table: 56-001-X19990015193
    Description:

    Revenues of the radio and television broadcasting industry reached 4,14 billion in 1998, an increase of 5.1% from 1997. Employment in this industry decreased slightly to 27,408 from 27,909 in 1997.

    Release date: 1999-07-08

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1999024
    Description:

    In recent years, Canada's economy has continued to become more service-based. This shift is particularly evident when examining information by sector for Canada's workforce. This paper offers a descriptive historical overview of changes in employment and remuneration in the services sector during the 1984-97 period. Changes in full-time employment, part-time employment, self-employment, and average wages and salaries are noted.

    As well, particular attention is devoted to shifts in these indicators for such service industries as: finance, insurance and real estate services; business services; food and beverage services; communication services; amusement and recreation services; and traveler accommodation services.

    Release date: 1999-06-17

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X19980044487
    Description:

    This article examines data on the seasonal patterns of demand for accomodation supplied by Canada's hotel and motel establishments during the 1996 reference year.

    Release date: 1999-04-15

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1999022
    Description:

    Based on data from the Labour Force Survey and the Longitudinal Worker File, this document examines job stability patterns in Canada, particularly in the services sector. It finds that job stability varies not only between the services and non-services sectors, but also within the services sector. For example, jobs are equally as stable in the business services, distributive services and manufacturing industries, but less stable in the consumer services and primary and construction industries. Job stability is highest in public services.

    This document also demonstrates that aggregate job stability is now at historically high levels, partly due to drops in permanent layoff rates and quit rates. Since a rising quit rate usually accompanies a robust economy, the increase in job stability that arises from lower quit rates is not necessarily a positive development. Lower quit rates are found in the business services and public services industries. This contrasts with consumer services where the rise in job stability was caused by a drop in permanent layoff rates.

    Release date: 1999-03-01

  • Table: 56-001-X19980035194
    Description:

    The cable television industry has reported revenues of $2.8 billion in 1997, a 3.9% increase over 1996. Total revenue from basic cable television operations increased by 3.2% to $1,967.9 million from $1,906.1 million. Total revenue from non-basic and other services increased by 5.7% to $819.5 million from $775.5 million.

    Release date: 1999-03-01

  • Table: 88-516-X
    Description:

    Innovation is at the heart of economic growth and development. It is through innovation that new products are brought to market, new production processes developed and organizational change realized. Given existing cross-industry variations in structure, competitiveness and maturity, it is reasonable to expect that firms in different industries will innovate for different reasons, in different ways and with different results. This report focuses on how the innovation activities of firms in three dynamic service industries are conditioned by their different environments.

    Through an understanding of what competitive pressures come into play and how these pressures affect the type of innovation that is performed, Innovation in dynamic service industries goes some way in illustrating how innovation regimes differ substantially, and quite logically, from one industry to another.

    This is the fifth in the series of publications on innovation and technological change in Canada. One of the earlier studies investigated the type of innovation taking place in the manufacturing sector (Baldwin and Da Pont, Innovation in Canadian manufacturing enterprises, Catalogue No. 88-513-XPB). Two others focused on advanced manufacturing technologies. The first (Baldwin and Sabourin, Technology adoption in Canadian manufacturing, Catalogue No. 88-512-XPB) outlined the intensity of use of these technologies. The second (Baldwin, Sabourin, and Rafiquzzaman, Benefits and problems associated with technology adoption, Catalogue No. 88-514-XPE) investigated the determinants of adoption. Another study (Baldwin, Innovation and intellectual property, Catalogue No. 88-515-XPE) examined how innovative firms protect their intellectual property after they have innovated.

    Release date: 1999-01-18

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X19980034328
    Description:

    To supplement the Services Indicators tables that regularly carry employment and remuneration data on six broad services industries for the most recent eight quarters, this section offers an historical overview of these same indicators, compiled annually, dating back to 1984. Employment shifts in these six industries from 1984 to 1997 are described, followed by detailed tables that quantify some aspects of services sector employment.

    Release date: 1999-01-15

Data (4)

Data (4) (4 of 4 results)

  • Table: 56-001-X19990025192
    Description:

    This report is an advance of selected data from the 1997 Annual Survey of Telecommunications Service Providers. This newly redesigned survey serves to measure the telecommunications industry's financial performance as well as aspects of network infrastructure and connectedness.

    Release date: 1999-08-20

  • Table: 56-001-X19990015193
    Description:

    Revenues of the radio and television broadcasting industry reached 4,14 billion in 1998, an increase of 5.1% from 1997. Employment in this industry decreased slightly to 27,408 from 27,909 in 1997.

    Release date: 1999-07-08

  • Table: 56-001-X19980035194
    Description:

    The cable television industry has reported revenues of $2.8 billion in 1997, a 3.9% increase over 1996. Total revenue from basic cable television operations increased by 3.2% to $1,967.9 million from $1,906.1 million. Total revenue from non-basic and other services increased by 5.7% to $819.5 million from $775.5 million.

    Release date: 1999-03-01

  • Table: 88-516-X
    Description:

    Innovation is at the heart of economic growth and development. It is through innovation that new products are brought to market, new production processes developed and organizational change realized. Given existing cross-industry variations in structure, competitiveness and maturity, it is reasonable to expect that firms in different industries will innovate for different reasons, in different ways and with different results. This report focuses on how the innovation activities of firms in three dynamic service industries are conditioned by their different environments.

    Through an understanding of what competitive pressures come into play and how these pressures affect the type of innovation that is performed, Innovation in dynamic service industries goes some way in illustrating how innovation regimes differ substantially, and quite logically, from one industry to another.

    This is the fifth in the series of publications on innovation and technological change in Canada. One of the earlier studies investigated the type of innovation taking place in the manufacturing sector (Baldwin and Da Pont, Innovation in Canadian manufacturing enterprises, Catalogue No. 88-513-XPB). Two others focused on advanced manufacturing technologies. The first (Baldwin and Sabourin, Technology adoption in Canadian manufacturing, Catalogue No. 88-512-XPB) outlined the intensity of use of these technologies. The second (Baldwin, Sabourin, and Rafiquzzaman, Benefits and problems associated with technology adoption, Catalogue No. 88-514-XPE) investigated the determinants of adoption. Another study (Baldwin, Innovation and intellectual property, Catalogue No. 88-515-XPE) examined how innovative firms protect their intellectual property after they have innovated.

    Release date: 1999-01-18

Analysis (12)

Analysis (12) (12 of 12 results)

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1999027
    Description:

    Computer communications occur when someone connects a computer to a communications network to access information on the Internet, to send and receive e-mail, or to use electronic banking services. This article uses 1998 data to update previous estimates of the proportion of Canadian households regularly using computer communications, analyzing the relationships between usage and location of use, household income, and other demographic factors. The article also looks at the growth of household connectedness over the past year, as well as the time spent using computer communications from home for a variety of services that can be accessed through the Internet.

    Release date: 1999-12-24

  • Articles and reports: 87-403-X19970014747
    Description:

    This chapter describes four specific industry sectors : accomodation services, restaurant services, travel agencies and tour operators, and Canadian tourist attractions.

    Release date: 1999-11-24

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1999026
    Description:

    Growth in the gambling industries has continued to outstrip that of most industries. Gambling has brought such economic benefits as increased revenues and employment to many regions. Although some communities have not embraced the arrival of casinos and video lottery terminals, most households in Canada do participate in and spend money on some form of gambling activity. This article presents a statistical portrait of Canada's gambling industry. It examines the economic output, jobs, and government revenues generated by the gambling industry, and also provides provincial comparisons.

    Release date: 1999-09-03

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1999025
    Description:

    Both personal and business travel have seasonal patterns that lead to variations in the demand for hotels, motels and other accommodation services. This article examines seasonal fluctuations experienced by Canada's traveller accommodation industry in 1996. It then focuses on monthly variations in hotel and motel occupancy rates according to such factors as location, establishment size and market orientation. The summary measures yielded by this study also offer useful benchmarks against which individual hotels and motels can compare their own room utilization figures.

    Release date: 1999-08-09

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X19990014628
    Description:

    Foreign ownership in telecommunications - always a sensitive issue for Canada - is likely to become even more important for policymakers to follow in the future, as globalization leads to increased competition. A new paper from Statistics Canada sheds light on the make-up of the industry, comparing the performance of foreign-and-Canadian-controlled firms.

    Release date: 1999-07-23

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X19990014627
    Description:

    Twenty years ago, it was rare for a university to patent an invention, create a spin-off company or license a technology - the priority was to "publish or perish." But according to the results of a new pilot survey, the catch phrase might well become "patent or publish". In 1997-98, Canada's universities registered 143 new patents and licensed 243 technologies, bringing in almost $16 million in royalties.

    Release date: 1999-07-23

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X19990014621
    Description:

    This paper will look at challenges facing ISPs today including barriers to growth, competing in the Internet sector, complaints and practices regarding offensive content and conduct, as well as ISPs' perceptions of what is important to customers. These issues will be analysed after classifying ISPs into four different size categories, based on ISP revenue. This will enable one to see any differences in perception or conduct between ISPs of varying sizes.

    Release date: 1999-07-15

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X19990014622
    Description:

    The North American Industrial Classification System (NAICS) is being adopted by Statistics Canada to replace the 1980 Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system used during the past two decades. The impetus behind NAICS was the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and the resultant need for the three signatories (Canada, the United States and Mexico) to have a statistical framework enabling industrial statistics to be collected, analyzed and disseminated in a consistent manner by all three countries on an industry-by-industry basis.

    Release date: 1999-07-15

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1999024
    Description:

    In recent years, Canada's economy has continued to become more service-based. This shift is particularly evident when examining information by sector for Canada's workforce. This paper offers a descriptive historical overview of changes in employment and remuneration in the services sector during the 1984-97 period. Changes in full-time employment, part-time employment, self-employment, and average wages and salaries are noted.

    As well, particular attention is devoted to shifts in these indicators for such service industries as: finance, insurance and real estate services; business services; food and beverage services; communication services; amusement and recreation services; and traveler accommodation services.

    Release date: 1999-06-17

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X19980044487
    Description:

    This article examines data on the seasonal patterns of demand for accomodation supplied by Canada's hotel and motel establishments during the 1996 reference year.

    Release date: 1999-04-15

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1999022
    Description:

    Based on data from the Labour Force Survey and the Longitudinal Worker File, this document examines job stability patterns in Canada, particularly in the services sector. It finds that job stability varies not only between the services and non-services sectors, but also within the services sector. For example, jobs are equally as stable in the business services, distributive services and manufacturing industries, but less stable in the consumer services and primary and construction industries. Job stability is highest in public services.

    This document also demonstrates that aggregate job stability is now at historically high levels, partly due to drops in permanent layoff rates and quit rates. Since a rising quit rate usually accompanies a robust economy, the increase in job stability that arises from lower quit rates is not necessarily a positive development. Lower quit rates are found in the business services and public services industries. This contrasts with consumer services where the rise in job stability was caused by a drop in permanent layoff rates.

    Release date: 1999-03-01

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X19980034328
    Description:

    To supplement the Services Indicators tables that regularly carry employment and remuneration data on six broad services industries for the most recent eight quarters, this section offers an historical overview of these same indicators, compiled annually, dating back to 1984. Employment shifts in these six industries from 1984 to 1997 are described, followed by detailed tables that quantify some aspects of services sector employment.

    Release date: 1999-01-15

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