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All (18)

All (18) (18 of 18 results)

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X2000033
    Description:

    Based on 1997 results from the Traveller Accommodation Survey, it profiles Canada's hotels and motor hotels industry. Relative measures of the industry's characteristics, performance and workforce are presented with some information specific to small, medium, and large-sized establishments. The data indicate that, for a variety of reasons, large-sized hotels and motor hotels outperform other establishments in the industry.

    Release date: 2000-12-13

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X2000032
    Description:

    This paper examines how food service providers and food stores competed for Canadians' food dollars in the 1990s, and how this intense competition affected both industries. The paper outlines some reasons for changes in both the demand for, and supply of, each industry's outputs. It also profiles in detail some characteristics of the consumer market for food services.

    Release date: 2000-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X20000025331
    Description:

    This article looks at the fast-growing Computer Services industry in Canada, with a particular focus on software developers, data processing firms, systems consultants, and Internet service providers.

    Release date: 2000-10-26

  • Table: 56-001-X20000035203
    Description:

    Revenues of private television broadcasters reached $1,862.9 in 1999, an increase of 2.2% from 1998. This increase is modest when compared to the two previous years where revenues grew 7.0% and 6.3% respectively. There was very little change in the relative importance of sources of revenues; the sale of air time accounted for 94.1% of revenues compared to 94.6% a year earlier.

    Release date: 2000-09-26

  • Table: 56-001-X20000025190
    Description:

    Revenues of private radio broadcasters reached $971.9 million in 1999, an increase of 3.2% from 1998. This increase is modest when compared to the two previous years where revenues rose 8.1% and 7.5% respectively.

    Release date: 2000-09-12

  • Table: 56-001-X20000015155
    Description:

    This is the second release of preliminary data in advance of the annual publication, scheduled for completion in October of this year. It covers facilities-based carriers (wireline, wireless and satellite) as well as resellers.

    Release date: 2000-08-11

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X20000015128
    Description:

    The objective of this article is to present relative meaures of characteristics, performance and workforce of hotels and motor hotels with some information specific to small-medium-and large-size establishments.

    Release date: 2000-07-18

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X19990044946
    Description:

    This article will examine how food service providers and food stores have competed for Canadians' food dollars in the 1990s, and then look at how this intense competition has affected both industries. Each industry has evolved with the objective of improving efficiency and gaining additional market share.

    Release date: 2000-04-14

  • Table: 56-001-X19990044940
    Description:

    This bulletin is a preliminary release of 1998 annual data for the Cellular Telecommunications Industry (including PCS and ESMR service providers) with accompanying data from 1995.

    Release date: 2000-04-11

  • Table: 56-203-X19970004929
    Description:

    The purpose of this short report is to provide basic information on the relative importance of the different players in the industry.

    Release date: 2000-02-29

  • Table: 56-001-X19990035191
    Description:

    The cable and other program distribution industry has reported revenues of $3.1 billion in 1998, a 10.0% increase over 1997. This relatively strong growth is due in large part to the fast growing non-basic services segment. While revenue from basic services grew moderately (2.1%) revenue from non-basic and other services increased by 29.0%.

    Release date: 2000-02-11

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2000143
    Description:

    This paper explores differences between innovative and non-innovative establishments in business service industries. It focuses on small establishments that supply core technical inputs to other firms: establishments in computer and related services, engineering, and other scientific and technical services.

    The analysis begins by examining the incidence of innovation within the small firm population. Forty percent of small businesses report introducing new or improved products, processes or organizational forms. Among these businesses, product innovation dominates over process or organizational change. A majority of these establishments reveal an ongoing commitment to innovation programs by introducing innovations on a regular basis. By contrast, businesses that do not introduce new or improved products, processes or organizational methods reveal little supporting evidence of innovation activity.

    The paper then investigates differences in strategic intensity between innovative and non-innovative businesses. Innovators attach greater importance to financial management and capital acquisition. Innovators also place more emphasis on recruiting skilled labour and on promoting incentive compensation. These distinctions are sensible - among small firms in R&D-intensive industries, financing and human resource competencies play a critical role in the innovation process.

    A final section examines whether the obstacles to innovation differ between innovators and non-innovators. Innovators are more likely to report difficulties related to market success, imitation, and skill restrictions. Evidence of learning-by-doing is more apparent within a multivariate framework. The probability of encountering risk-related obstacles and input restrictions is higher among establishments that engage in R&D and use intellectual property rights, both key elements of the innovation process. Many obstacles to innovation are also more apparent for businesses that stress financing, marketing, production or human resource strategies.

    Release date: 2000-01-25

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2000127
    Description:

    In studies of business innovation, the term innovation process is used to describe (i) the array of sources and objectives that culminate in the act of innovation, (ii) the set of market effects that result from innovation, and (iii) the obstacles that firms encounter when pursuing innovation strategies. An examination of the innovation process is thus designed to bring about a more comprehensive understanding of the characteristics that innovative firms share, as well as of those characteristics that set innovators apart from other businesses. The Survey of Innovation, 1996 examined innovation in three dynamic service industries: communications, financial services, and technical business services.

    This paper explores the principal findings to emerge from the Survey of Innovation, 1996. Two themes are apparent. In the first instance, many elements of the innovation process are common to all the service industries studied, such as an emphasis on product innovation, a strong customer orientation, and a commitment to service quality. Beyond these common elements, however, differences in competitive pressures across these industries serve to engender important differences in innovation strategies. Accordingly, much of what we can ultimately learn about the innovation process occurs at the industry level.

    Release date: 2000-01-19

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X19990034862
    Description:

    The travel agency industry plays an essential role in Canada's tourism industry, and has ripple effects on other sectors of the Canadian economy. This article presents 1997 data on the industry's general characteristics, revenue and cost structure, client base, marketing methods, and trade patterns. To offer more context, these results are sometimes compared to those of previous years.

    Release date: 2000-01-18

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X19990025335
    Description:

    In just over a decade, the cellular telephone industry has grown to close to one fifth the size of the traditional teletphone segment of the industry, experiencing an annual revenue growth rate between 22% and 29%. By December 1997, there were just over 4 million cellular telephone subscribers in Canada - a 22% increase over the previous year - more than double the level of subscribers in 1994.

    Release date: 2000-01-17

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X19990025344
    Description:

    A Statistics Canada study uses business demographics to learn about innovation and technological change and uncovers interesting patterns. Contrary to expectations, the author uncovered considerable volatility (start-ups and closures) in the service sector. The volatility rate for this sector was 31% compared with 23% for the manufacturing sector. Firms that do not innovate frequently are replaced by new ones that have new or improved products to offer or by those that employ more efficient methods of production and delivery.

    Release date: 2000-01-17

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1999028
    Description:

    This article focuses on characteristics of primary Internet service providers (ISPs), that is, firms reporting that 50% or more of their revenues come from ISP activities. It looks at challenges facing ISPs including barriers to growth, competing in the Internet sector, complaints and practices regarding offensive content and conduct, as well as ISPs' perceptions of what is important to their customers. These items are analysed after classifying ISPs into four different size categories, enabling one to see any differences in perception or conduct between ISPs of varying sizes.

    Release date: 2000-01-10

Data (7)

Data (7) (7 of 7 results)

Analysis (11)

Analysis (11) (11 of 11 results)

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X2000033
    Description:

    Based on 1997 results from the Traveller Accommodation Survey, it profiles Canada's hotels and motor hotels industry. Relative measures of the industry's characteristics, performance and workforce are presented with some information specific to small, medium, and large-sized establishments. The data indicate that, for a variety of reasons, large-sized hotels and motor hotels outperform other establishments in the industry.

    Release date: 2000-12-13

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X2000032
    Description:

    This paper examines how food service providers and food stores competed for Canadians' food dollars in the 1990s, and how this intense competition affected both industries. The paper outlines some reasons for changes in both the demand for, and supply of, each industry's outputs. It also profiles in detail some characteristics of the consumer market for food services.

    Release date: 2000-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X20000025331
    Description:

    This article looks at the fast-growing Computer Services industry in Canada, with a particular focus on software developers, data processing firms, systems consultants, and Internet service providers.

    Release date: 2000-10-26

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X20000015128
    Description:

    The objective of this article is to present relative meaures of characteristics, performance and workforce of hotels and motor hotels with some information specific to small-medium-and large-size establishments.

    Release date: 2000-07-18

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X19990044946
    Description:

    This article will examine how food service providers and food stores have competed for Canadians' food dollars in the 1990s, and then look at how this intense competition has affected both industries. Each industry has evolved with the objective of improving efficiency and gaining additional market share.

    Release date: 2000-04-14

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2000143
    Description:

    This paper explores differences between innovative and non-innovative establishments in business service industries. It focuses on small establishments that supply core technical inputs to other firms: establishments in computer and related services, engineering, and other scientific and technical services.

    The analysis begins by examining the incidence of innovation within the small firm population. Forty percent of small businesses report introducing new or improved products, processes or organizational forms. Among these businesses, product innovation dominates over process or organizational change. A majority of these establishments reveal an ongoing commitment to innovation programs by introducing innovations on a regular basis. By contrast, businesses that do not introduce new or improved products, processes or organizational methods reveal little supporting evidence of innovation activity.

    The paper then investigates differences in strategic intensity between innovative and non-innovative businesses. Innovators attach greater importance to financial management and capital acquisition. Innovators also place more emphasis on recruiting skilled labour and on promoting incentive compensation. These distinctions are sensible - among small firms in R&D-intensive industries, financing and human resource competencies play a critical role in the innovation process.

    A final section examines whether the obstacles to innovation differ between innovators and non-innovators. Innovators are more likely to report difficulties related to market success, imitation, and skill restrictions. Evidence of learning-by-doing is more apparent within a multivariate framework. The probability of encountering risk-related obstacles and input restrictions is higher among establishments that engage in R&D and use intellectual property rights, both key elements of the innovation process. Many obstacles to innovation are also more apparent for businesses that stress financing, marketing, production or human resource strategies.

    Release date: 2000-01-25

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2000127
    Description:

    In studies of business innovation, the term innovation process is used to describe (i) the array of sources and objectives that culminate in the act of innovation, (ii) the set of market effects that result from innovation, and (iii) the obstacles that firms encounter when pursuing innovation strategies. An examination of the innovation process is thus designed to bring about a more comprehensive understanding of the characteristics that innovative firms share, as well as of those characteristics that set innovators apart from other businesses. The Survey of Innovation, 1996 examined innovation in three dynamic service industries: communications, financial services, and technical business services.

    This paper explores the principal findings to emerge from the Survey of Innovation, 1996. Two themes are apparent. In the first instance, many elements of the innovation process are common to all the service industries studied, such as an emphasis on product innovation, a strong customer orientation, and a commitment to service quality. Beyond these common elements, however, differences in competitive pressures across these industries serve to engender important differences in innovation strategies. Accordingly, much of what we can ultimately learn about the innovation process occurs at the industry level.

    Release date: 2000-01-19

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X19990034862
    Description:

    The travel agency industry plays an essential role in Canada's tourism industry, and has ripple effects on other sectors of the Canadian economy. This article presents 1997 data on the industry's general characteristics, revenue and cost structure, client base, marketing methods, and trade patterns. To offer more context, these results are sometimes compared to those of previous years.

    Release date: 2000-01-18

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X19990025335
    Description:

    In just over a decade, the cellular telephone industry has grown to close to one fifth the size of the traditional teletphone segment of the industry, experiencing an annual revenue growth rate between 22% and 29%. By December 1997, there were just over 4 million cellular telephone subscribers in Canada - a 22% increase over the previous year - more than double the level of subscribers in 1994.

    Release date: 2000-01-17

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X19990025344
    Description:

    A Statistics Canada study uses business demographics to learn about innovation and technological change and uncovers interesting patterns. Contrary to expectations, the author uncovered considerable volatility (start-ups and closures) in the service sector. The volatility rate for this sector was 31% compared with 23% for the manufacturing sector. Firms that do not innovate frequently are replaced by new ones that have new or improved products to offer or by those that employ more efficient methods of production and delivery.

    Release date: 2000-01-17

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1999028
    Description:

    This article focuses on characteristics of primary Internet service providers (ISPs), that is, firms reporting that 50% or more of their revenues come from ISP activities. It looks at challenges facing ISPs including barriers to growth, competing in the Internet sector, complaints and practices regarding offensive content and conduct, as well as ISPs' perceptions of what is important to their customers. These items are analysed after classifying ISPs into four different size categories, enabling one to see any differences in perception or conduct between ISPs of varying sizes.

    Release date: 2000-01-10

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