Statistics by subject – Business performance and ownership

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All (14)

All (14) (14 of 14 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2003019
    Description:

    This paper examines the migration of head offices to other countries from 1999 to 2002. It uses data from Statistics Canada's Business Register.

    Release date: 2003-12-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2003006
    Description:

    This article looks at trends in the Canadian retail clothing industry from 1997 to 2002. Findings include the following: there is a growing market share of unisex clothing stores at the expense of specialized men's and women's clothing stores, most clothing spending is for women's wear and there exists a similarity between men's and women's buying patterns. The information is based on data from the Monthly Retail Trade Survey and the Quarterly Retail Commodity Survey.

    Release date: 2003-11-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2003005
    Description:

    This paper examines Canada's beef exports and imports throughout the early days of the beef export ban that came into effect on May 20, 2003. The Canadian beef export market was worth about $4.1 billion in 2002. These exports dropped to virtually zero in June, July and August after the implementation of a worldwide ban on Canadian beef products following the discovery of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) - more commonly known as mad cow disease - in a single cow. Canadian beef imports increased above historical levels in June before dropping in July and August. Canadian beef imports have not been trivial: they accounted for about $900 million in 2002 or almost 30% of the beef and veal consumed in Canada.

    Release date: 2003-11-05

  • Articles and reports: 11-624-M2003003
    Description:

    This paper provides an empirical analysis of the levels and trends in the industrial diversity of Canadian cities over the past 10 years (1992 to 2002). Diverse cities are thought to be more stable and provide better environments that lead to stronger economic growth.

    Release date: 2003-10-27

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2003014
    Description:

    This paper examines substantial productivity gains in Canadian manufacturing resulting from tariff reductions from the Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement.

    Release date: 2003-09-08

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2003011
    Description:

    This paper explores the linkages between export-market participation and productivity performance in Canadian manufacturing plants, between foreign-controlled and domestic-controlled plants, and between young and older plants.

    Release date: 2003-08-15

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2003202
    Description:

    This paper examines the factors underlying firm failure, and compares the failure mechanisms for young firms against those of older organizations. This paper suggests that there are systematic differences between the determinants of firm failure for firms that fail early in life and those that fail after having successfully negotiated the early liabilities of newness and adolescence. Data from 339 Canadian corporate bankruptcies confirm that younger firms fail because of inadequacies in managerial knowledge and financial management abilities. On the other hand, older firms are more likely to fail because of an inability to adapt to environmental change.

    Release date: 2003-08-08

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2003006
    Description:

    This paper explores the financial characteristics of successful Canadian small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

    Release date: 2003-08-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2003003
    Description:

    This report compares employment growth in information and communications technology (ICT) industries and science-based industries across provinces, urban and rural regions and census metropolitan areas (CMAs).

    Release date: 2003-07-31

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2003012
    Description:

    This paper investigates the evolution of industrial structure in the Canadian food processing sector and its relationship to technological change. It uses 1998 special survey data on advanced technology use, plant characteristics and plant performance.

    Release date: 2003-06-03

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2003008
    Description:

    This paper analyses the border effect and its relation to tariff-based and non-tariff-based barriers to cross-border trade in North America.

    Release date: 2003-04-16

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2003005
    Description:

    This paper measures the structural characteristics of regional economies; diversity, growth, plant size and export intensity; increases in export orientation; and other aspects of manufacturing employment in different Canadian regions for the period 1976 to 1997.

    Release date: 2003-04-11

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2003193
    Description:

    This paper outlines the size of the turnover in plants that have entered and exited the Canadian manufacturing sector during the three periods: 1973-1979, 1979-1988 and 1988-1997. It also examines the contribution of plant turnover to labour productivity growth in the manufacturing sector over the three periods. Plant turnover makes a significant contribution to productivity growth as more productive entrants replace exiting plants that are less productive. A disproportionately large fraction of the contribution of plant turnover to productivity growth is due to multi-plant or foreign-controlled firms closing down and opening up new plants. The plants opened up by multi-plant or foreign-controlled firms are typically much more productive than those opened by single-plant or domestic-controlled.

    Release date: 2003-04-02

  • Technical products: 88F0006X2003002
    Description:

    Today, businesses and individuals are more frequently using electronic networks to obtain information; but are they also using these networks to share information or to create business solutions? Individuals can turn to the Internet to check out companies that post annual reports, catalogues and job opportunities. Businesses can post their catalogues, ask for and reply to tenders, offer training, communicate with customers and suppliers, and post job opportunities over electronic networks. Finally, public sector administrations have entered heavily into electronic information sharing under such initiatives as Government On-Line.

    The Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology captured how, in 2001, businesses used the Internet, intranets, extranets or electronic data interchanges (EDIs) to make information available within their organizations, to their suppliers or customers, or accessible to other organizations. Businesses were asked the types of information, or interactive or network-based activities they made available via electronic networks. Information included product descriptions or catalogues, order status, demand projections, inventory data, customer information and job opportunities. The one interactive or network-based activity captured was electronic training. The information flows captured by this question provide a better understanding of how e-business, in particular electronic customer and supplier relationships, is operating in Canada.

    Release date: 2003-03-03

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  • Technical products: 88F0006X2003002
    Description:

    Today, businesses and individuals are more frequently using electronic networks to obtain information; but are they also using these networks to share information or to create business solutions? Individuals can turn to the Internet to check out companies that post annual reports, catalogues and job opportunities. Businesses can post their catalogues, ask for and reply to tenders, offer training, communicate with customers and suppliers, and post job opportunities over electronic networks. Finally, public sector administrations have entered heavily into electronic information sharing under such initiatives as Government On-Line.

    The Survey of Electronic Commerce and Technology captured how, in 2001, businesses used the Internet, intranets, extranets or electronic data interchanges (EDIs) to make information available within their organizations, to their suppliers or customers, or accessible to other organizations. Businesses were asked the types of information, or interactive or network-based activities they made available via electronic networks. Information included product descriptions or catalogues, order status, demand projections, inventory data, customer information and job opportunities. The one interactive or network-based activity captured was electronic training. The information flows captured by this question provide a better understanding of how e-business, in particular electronic customer and supplier relationships, is operating in Canada.

    Release date: 2003-03-03

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