Statistics by subject – Business performance and ownership

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All (16)

All (16) (16 of 16 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201001211393
    Description:

    Output and employment growth regularly slows, as occurred over the summer of 2010. This paper looks at slowdowns over the last three decades, and finds they occur in response to a wide range of cyclical and irregular factors. However, they rarely if ever turn into recessions.

    Release date: 2010-12-09

  • Table: Summary table
    Release date: 2010-08-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2010063
    Description:

    This paper examines how trade liberalization and fluctuations in real exchange rates affect export-market entry/exit and plant-level productivity. It uses the experience of Canadian manufacturing plants over three separate periods that featuring different rates of bilateral tariff reduction and differing movements in bilateral real exchange rates. The patterns of entry and exit responses as well as the productivity outcomes differ markedly in the three periods. Consistent with much of the recent literature, the paper finds that plants self-select into export markets-that is, more efficient plants are more likely to enter and less likely to exit export markets. The reverse also occurs: entrants to export markets improve their productivity performance relative to the population from which they originated and plants that stay in export markets do better than comparable plants that exited, lending support to the thesis that exporting boosts productivity. Finally, we find that overall market access conditions, including real exchange rate trends, significantly affect the extent of productivity gains to be derived from participating in export markets. In particular, the increase in the value of the Canadian dollar during the post-2002 period almost completely offset the productivity growth advantages that new export-market participants would otherwise have enjoyed.

    Release date: 2010-06-25

  • Journals and periodicals: 11-624-M
    Description:

    This series contains short analytical articles providing statistical insights on emerging issues in the economy such as productivity, innovation and technology use. These articles briefly describe the issues and the results examined by these research papers.

    The articles describe issues on a wide range of topics, including - the amount of dynamic competition taking place as a result of the entry of new firms and the exit of closed firms; - the amount of merger activity taking place; - the difference between multinational and domestic firms; - the productivity growth in Canada; - the changes in the geographic location of industry; - the problems in small-firm financing; - the changing industrial structure of different regions; - how the economy interacts with the environment; - the changes in trade patterns; - Canada/United States price differences; - the innovation process in Canada; - the differences between small and large producers; - the changing patterns of advanced technology use and its effect on firm performance; - the type of strategies that differentiate more-successful from less-successful firms.

    Release date: 2010-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201000511164
    Description:

    Financial and commodity markets saw declines late in 2008 that set records for both speed and severity. This paper explores some of the reasons for these rapid declines and their implications for output and employment.

    Release date: 2010-05-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201000411150
    Description:

    The global recession of 2008-2009 was less severe and shorter in Canada. While exports and corporate profits fell sharply due to the global recession, domestic spending was sustained by strong balance sheets and savings built up in previous years and a financial system that emerged largely unscathed from the crisis in the US and Europe. The industrial pattern of the recession in Canada was quite similar to previous recessions.

    Release date: 2010-04-15

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2010061
    Description:

    We examine the simultaneous effects of real-exchange-rate movements and of tariff reductions on plant death in Canadian manufacturing industries between 1979 and 1996. We find that both currency appreciation and tariff cuts increase the probability of plant death, but that tariff reductions have a much greater effect. Consistent with the implications of recent international-trade models involving heterogeneous firms, we further find that the effect of exchange-rate movements and tariff cuts on exit are heterogeneous across plants - particularly pronounced among least efficient plants. Our results reveal multi-dimensional heterogeneity that current models featuring one-dimensional heterogeneity (efficiency differences among plants) cannot fully explain. There are significant and substantial differences between exporters and non-exporters, and between domestic- and foreign- controlled plants. Exporters and foreign-owned plants have much lower failure rates; however, their survival is more sensitive to changes in tariffs and real exchange rates, whether differences in their efficiency levels are controlled or not.

    Release date: 2010-04-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201000311141
    Description:

    A review of what seasonal adjustment does, and how it helps analysts focus on recent movements in the underlying trend of economic data.

    Release date: 2010-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2010060
    Description:

    This paper asks whether synergies or managerial discipline operates in different ways across small versus large plants to affect the likelihood of mergers. Our findings indicate that those characteristics which provide the type of synergies upon which ownership changes rely are important factors leading to plant-ownership changes across most size classes. The magnitudes, however, are different across plant-size classes, with synergies generally being more important in larger plants.

    Foreign plants in all size classes are more likely to be taken over. The effective rates of control change differ much more in the small than in the larger size classes. Compared to domestic plants, multinational plants in the smaller size classes contain relatively more of the type of intangible capital that makes them attractive vehicles for the transmission of new knowledge via takeover.

    Release date: 2010-02-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2010020
    Description:

    Using 2001 Census data, this paper investigates the extent to which the urban-rural gap in the earnings of employed workers is associated with human capital composition and agglomeration economies. Both factors have been theoretically and empirically linked to urban-rural earnings differences. Agglomeration economies-the productivity enhancing effects of the geographic concentration of workers and firms-may underlie these differences as they may be stronger in larger urban centres. But human capital composition may also drive the urban-rural earnings gap if workers with higher levels of education and/or experience are more prevalent in cities. The analysis finds that up to one-half of urban-rural earnings differences are related to human capital composition. It also demonstrates that agglomeration economies related to city size are associated with earnings levels, but their influence is significantly reduced by the inclusion of controls for human capital.

    Release date: 2010-01-25

Data (7)

Data (7) (7 of 7 results)

Analysis (9)

Analysis (9) (9 of 9 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201001211393
    Description:

    Output and employment growth regularly slows, as occurred over the summer of 2010. This paper looks at slowdowns over the last three decades, and finds they occur in response to a wide range of cyclical and irregular factors. However, they rarely if ever turn into recessions.

    Release date: 2010-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2010063
    Description:

    This paper examines how trade liberalization and fluctuations in real exchange rates affect export-market entry/exit and plant-level productivity. It uses the experience of Canadian manufacturing plants over three separate periods that featuring different rates of bilateral tariff reduction and differing movements in bilateral real exchange rates. The patterns of entry and exit responses as well as the productivity outcomes differ markedly in the three periods. Consistent with much of the recent literature, the paper finds that plants self-select into export markets-that is, more efficient plants are more likely to enter and less likely to exit export markets. The reverse also occurs: entrants to export markets improve their productivity performance relative to the population from which they originated and plants that stay in export markets do better than comparable plants that exited, lending support to the thesis that exporting boosts productivity. Finally, we find that overall market access conditions, including real exchange rate trends, significantly affect the extent of productivity gains to be derived from participating in export markets. In particular, the increase in the value of the Canadian dollar during the post-2002 period almost completely offset the productivity growth advantages that new export-market participants would otherwise have enjoyed.

    Release date: 2010-06-25

  • Journals and periodicals: 11-624-M
    Description:

    This series contains short analytical articles providing statistical insights on emerging issues in the economy such as productivity, innovation and technology use. These articles briefly describe the issues and the results examined by these research papers.

    The articles describe issues on a wide range of topics, including - the amount of dynamic competition taking place as a result of the entry of new firms and the exit of closed firms; - the amount of merger activity taking place; - the difference between multinational and domestic firms; - the productivity growth in Canada; - the changes in the geographic location of industry; - the problems in small-firm financing; - the changing industrial structure of different regions; - how the economy interacts with the environment; - the changes in trade patterns; - Canada/United States price differences; - the innovation process in Canada; - the differences between small and large producers; - the changing patterns of advanced technology use and its effect on firm performance; - the type of strategies that differentiate more-successful from less-successful firms.

    Release date: 2010-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201000511164
    Description:

    Financial and commodity markets saw declines late in 2008 that set records for both speed and severity. This paper explores some of the reasons for these rapid declines and their implications for output and employment.

    Release date: 2010-05-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201000411150
    Description:

    The global recession of 2008-2009 was less severe and shorter in Canada. While exports and corporate profits fell sharply due to the global recession, domestic spending was sustained by strong balance sheets and savings built up in previous years and a financial system that emerged largely unscathed from the crisis in the US and Europe. The industrial pattern of the recession in Canada was quite similar to previous recessions.

    Release date: 2010-04-15

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2010061
    Description:

    We examine the simultaneous effects of real-exchange-rate movements and of tariff reductions on plant death in Canadian manufacturing industries between 1979 and 1996. We find that both currency appreciation and tariff cuts increase the probability of plant death, but that tariff reductions have a much greater effect. Consistent with the implications of recent international-trade models involving heterogeneous firms, we further find that the effect of exchange-rate movements and tariff cuts on exit are heterogeneous across plants - particularly pronounced among least efficient plants. Our results reveal multi-dimensional heterogeneity that current models featuring one-dimensional heterogeneity (efficiency differences among plants) cannot fully explain. There are significant and substantial differences between exporters and non-exporters, and between domestic- and foreign- controlled plants. Exporters and foreign-owned plants have much lower failure rates; however, their survival is more sensitive to changes in tariffs and real exchange rates, whether differences in their efficiency levels are controlled or not.

    Release date: 2010-04-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X201000311141
    Description:

    A review of what seasonal adjustment does, and how it helps analysts focus on recent movements in the underlying trend of economic data.

    Release date: 2010-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 11F0027M2010060
    Description:

    This paper asks whether synergies or managerial discipline operates in different ways across small versus large plants to affect the likelihood of mergers. Our findings indicate that those characteristics which provide the type of synergies upon which ownership changes rely are important factors leading to plant-ownership changes across most size classes. The magnitudes, however, are different across plant-size classes, with synergies generally being more important in larger plants.

    Foreign plants in all size classes are more likely to be taken over. The effective rates of control change differ much more in the small than in the larger size classes. Compared to domestic plants, multinational plants in the smaller size classes contain relatively more of the type of intangible capital that makes them attractive vehicles for the transmission of new knowledge via takeover.

    Release date: 2010-02-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-622-M2010020
    Description:

    Using 2001 Census data, this paper investigates the extent to which the urban-rural gap in the earnings of employed workers is associated with human capital composition and agglomeration economies. Both factors have been theoretically and empirically linked to urban-rural earnings differences. Agglomeration economies-the productivity enhancing effects of the geographic concentration of workers and firms-may underlie these differences as they may be stronger in larger urban centres. But human capital composition may also drive the urban-rural earnings gap if workers with higher levels of education and/or experience are more prevalent in cities. The analysis finds that up to one-half of urban-rural earnings differences are related to human capital composition. It also demonstrates that agglomeration economies related to city size are associated with earnings levels, but their influence is significantly reduced by the inclusion of controls for human capital.

    Release date: 2010-01-25

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