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All (97) (25 of 97 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 81-599-X
    Description:

    The fact sheets in this series provide an "at-a-glance" overview of particular aspects of education in Canada and summarize key data trends in selected tables published as part of the Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program (PCEIP).

    The PCEIP mission is to publish a set of statistical measures on education systems in Canada for policy makers, practitioners and the general public to monitor the performance of education systems across jurisdictions and over time. PCEIP is a joint venture of Statistics Canada and the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada (CMEC).

    Release date: 2016-10-20

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2015-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114301
    Description:

    Using data from the 2006 Survey on the Vitality of Official-Language Minorities (SVOLM), this study examines the language behaviour of children of Francophone parents living in a minority language environment during cultural or social activities. It also explores factors associated with the use of French during such activities. The focus is on two particular activities: reading and watching television.

    Release date: 2015-12-17

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201300311774
    Description:

    This study compares trajectories of psychological distress among a nationally representative sample of Canadians aged 18 to 74 who did and did not experience parental addiction in childhood.

    Release date: 2013-03-20

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5179
    Release date: 2012-04-16

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2012-04-16

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 4435
    Release date: 2011-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201100211490
    Description:

    Previous analysis based on data from the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) has shown that reading proficiency, as measured in the Programme for the International Student Assessment (PISA) at age 15, is strongly associated with both high school graduation and postsecondary participation. This article uses the most recent data from YITS, collected when youth were age 25, to examine educational, labour market, income and family formation outcomes associated with reading proficiency levels on PISA at age 15. The intent of the analysis is to identify any life-path differences that were associated with reading proficiency levels at age 15. The analysis is descriptive and exploratory in nature. Further analysis is needed to identify causal relationships in the data.

    Release date: 2011-06-27

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 4450
    Release date: 2010-11-10

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-634-X
    Description:

    The Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) provides an extensive set of data about Aboriginal (Métis, Inuit, and off-reserve First Nations) children under 6 years of age in urban, rural, and northern locations across Canada. The Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) was designed to provide a picture of the early development of Aboriginal children and the social and living conditions in which they are learning and growing.

    The survey was developed by Statistics Canada and Aboriginal advisors from across the country and was conducted jointly with Human Resources and Social Development Canada.

    Release date: 2009-11-25

  • Articles and reports: 89-634-X2009008
    Description:

    The Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) is a parent-reported instrument designed to provide information on children's behaviours and relationships. The SDQ consists of 25 items which are grouped into five subscales: (1) pro-social, (2) inattention-hyperactivity, (3) emotional symptoms, (4) conduct problems, and (5) peer problems. The SDQ was used to provide information on children aged 2 to 5 years in the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS). Though validated on general populations, the constructs of the SDQ have not been validated for off-reserve First Nations, Métis and Inuit children in Canada. The first objective of this evaluation is to examine if the five subscales of the SDQ demonstrate construct validity and reliability for off-reserve First Nations, Métis and Inuit children. The second objective is to examine if an alternative set of subscales, using the 25 SDQ items, may be more valid and reliable for off-reserve First Nations, Métis and Inuit children.

    Release date: 2009-11-25

  • Articles and reports: 89-599-M2009006
    Description:

    This study used data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) to provide a picture of Canadian 9-year-old children at the transition between the primary grades and the junior grades in school. The children varied widely in their academic achievement, and some of these variations were linked to their gender, their family income level, and their province of residence. Marked differences were also found in the education environments of children, linked most consistently to family income levels. These education environments were not linked to academic success as measured by mathematics achievement at school. Academic achievement at age 9 was significantly related to school readiness four years earlier.

    Release date: 2009-09-25

  • Articles and reports: 89-634-X2008002
    Description:

    This is one of three fact sheets in the series using information from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) and 2006 Census. The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide information on the topics of family (persons involved in raising children, size of families, age of parents, lone parent families), socio-economic status (low-income economic families), feelings about community (as a place to raise children), and cultural activities (participation in traditional activities, having someone to help the child understand Métis history and culture, cultural activities in child care) for Métis children under six years of age.

    Release date: 2008-11-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-634-X2008003
    Description:

    This is one of three fact sheets in the series using information from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) and 2006 Census. The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide information on the topics of family (persons involved in raising children, size of families, age of parents, lone parent families, living with grandparents), socio-economic status (low-income economic families), feelings about community (as a place to raise children), and cultural activities (participation in traditional activities, having someone to help the child understand First Nations history and culture, cultural activities in child care) for First Nations children under six years of age living off reserve.

    Release date: 2008-11-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-634-X2008004
    Description:

    This is one of three fact sheets in the series using information from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) and 2006 Census. The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide information on the topics of family (persons involved in raising children, size of families, age of parents, adoption, living with grandparents), housing conditions (crowding, dwellings in need of major repairs, levels of satisfaction with housing conditions), feelings about community (facilities), and cultural activities (participation in traditional activities, having someone to help the child understand Inuit history and culture, cultural activities in child care). Results are presented for all Inuit children. Some results are also presented for those in Inuit Nunaat (meaning Inuit homeland): Nunatsiavut in northern Labrador, the territory of Nunavut, Nunavik in northern Quebec, and the Inuvialuit Settlement Region in the Northwest Territories.

    Release date: 2008-11-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-634-X200800210722
    Description:

    This is one of three fact sheets in the series using information from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) and 2006 Census. The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide information on the topics of family (persons involved in raising children, size of families, age of parents, lone parent families), socio-economic status (low-income economic families), feelings about community (as a place to raise children), and cultural activities (participation in traditional activities, having someone to help the child understand Métis history and culture, cultural activities in child care) for Métis children under six years of age.

    Release date: 2008-11-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-634-X200800410724
    Description:

    This is one of three fact sheets in the series using information from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) and 2006 Census. The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide information on the topics of family (persons involved in raising children, size of families, age of parents, adoption, living with grandparents), housing conditions (crowding, dwellings in need of major repairs, levels of satisfaction with housing conditions), feelings about community (facilities), and cultural activities (participation in traditional activities, having someone to help the child understand Inuit history and culture, cultural activities in child care). Results are presented for all Inuit children. Some results are also presented for those in Inuit Nunaat (meaning Inuit homeland): Nunatsiavut in northern Labrador, the territory of Nunavut, Nunavik in northern Quebec, and the Inuvialuit Settlement Region in the Northwest Territories.

    Release date: 2008-11-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-634-X200800310723
    Description:

    This is one of three fact sheets in the series using information from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) and 2006 Census. The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide information on the topics of family (persons involved in raising children, size of families, age of parents, lone parent families, living with grandparents), socio-economic status (low-income economic families), feelings about community (as a place to raise children), and cultural activities (participation in traditional activities, having someone to help the child understand First Nations history and culture, cultural activities in child care) for First Nations children under 6 years of age living off reserve.

    Release date: 2008-11-18

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5108
    Release date: 2008-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 89-634-X2008001
    Description:

    Using data from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) and the 2006 Census, this paper examines the topics of family, community, and child care of Aboriginal (off-reserve First Nations, Métis and Inuit) children under six years of age. The paper explores issues such as family characteristics (size of families, age of parents, living with grandparents, persons involved in raising young Aboriginal children, Aboriginal children living in low-income economic families), feelings about community, cultural activities and child care arrangements. It is designed as a starting point to understanding the social and living conditions in which young Aboriginal children are learning and growing. The report is divided into three parts: First Nations children living off reserve, Métis children, and Inuit children.

    Release date: 2008-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 89-634-X2008005
    Description:

    A series of supporting data tables accompany the analytical article from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS). These supporting data tables provide data at the provincial/regional level for Aboriginal, off-reserve First Nations, Métis and Inuit children under 6 years old for major themes covered in the analytical article: How often the child talks or plays together with different people, focusing attention on each other for five minutes or more; Feelings about home and daily life (housing conditions; support network from family, friends, or others; main job or activity; way spend free time; finances); Feelings about community (as a place with good schools, nursery schools and early childhood education programs; as a place with adequate facilities for children for example, community centres, rinks, gyms, parks; as a safe community; as a place with health facilities; as a place with actively involved members of the community; as a place with First Nations, Métis and Inuit cultural activities); Child care arrangements (percentage of children in child care; percentage of children in a child care arrangement that provides learning opportunities; percentage of children in a child care arrangement that promotes traditional and cultural values and customs); and, Percentage of children living in low-income families.

    Release date: 2008-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 89-599-M2008005
    Description:

    This study uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) to examine the relationship between late childbearing (at or after age 35) among first-time mothers in Canada and three facets of development: physical health, behaviour and cognitive development. The following research questions were addressed: do the developmental characteristics of children born to older mothers differ from those of children born to younger mothers? And do other factors, such as demographic characteristics and parenting practices, account for differences in child development by maternal age at birth? For this analysis, first-born children were identified from among all interviewed children whose year of birth was between 1998 and 2005.

    Release date: 2008-09-24

Data (53)

Data (53) (25 of 53 results)

Analysis (36)

Analysis (36) (25 of 36 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 81-599-X
    Description:

    The fact sheets in this series provide an "at-a-glance" overview of particular aspects of education in Canada and summarize key data trends in selected tables published as part of the Pan-Canadian Education Indicators Program (PCEIP).

    The PCEIP mission is to publish a set of statistical measures on education systems in Canada for policy makers, practitioners and the general public to monitor the performance of education systems across jurisdictions and over time. PCEIP is a joint venture of Statistics Canada and the Council of Ministers of Education, Canada (CMEC).

    Release date: 2016-10-20

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2015-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201500114301
    Description:

    Using data from the 2006 Survey on the Vitality of Official-Language Minorities (SVOLM), this study examines the language behaviour of children of Francophone parents living in a minority language environment during cultural or social activities. It also explores factors associated with the use of French during such activities. The focus is on two particular activities: reading and watching television.

    Release date: 2015-12-17

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2014-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201300311774
    Description:

    This study compares trajectories of psychological distress among a nationally representative sample of Canadians aged 18 to 74 who did and did not experience parental addiction in childhood.

    Release date: 2013-03-20

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2012-04-16

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X201100211490
    Description:

    Previous analysis based on data from the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) has shown that reading proficiency, as measured in the Programme for the International Student Assessment (PISA) at age 15, is strongly associated with both high school graduation and postsecondary participation. This article uses the most recent data from YITS, collected when youth were age 25, to examine educational, labour market, income and family formation outcomes associated with reading proficiency levels on PISA at age 15. The intent of the analysis is to identify any life-path differences that were associated with reading proficiency levels at age 15. The analysis is descriptive and exploratory in nature. Further analysis is needed to identify causal relationships in the data.

    Release date: 2011-06-27

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-634-X
    Description:

    The Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) provides an extensive set of data about Aboriginal (Métis, Inuit, and off-reserve First Nations) children under 6 years of age in urban, rural, and northern locations across Canada. The Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) was designed to provide a picture of the early development of Aboriginal children and the social and living conditions in which they are learning and growing.

    The survey was developed by Statistics Canada and Aboriginal advisors from across the country and was conducted jointly with Human Resources and Social Development Canada.

    Release date: 2009-11-25

  • Articles and reports: 89-634-X2009008
    Description:

    The Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) is a parent-reported instrument designed to provide information on children's behaviours and relationships. The SDQ consists of 25 items which are grouped into five subscales: (1) pro-social, (2) inattention-hyperactivity, (3) emotional symptoms, (4) conduct problems, and (5) peer problems. The SDQ was used to provide information on children aged 2 to 5 years in the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS). Though validated on general populations, the constructs of the SDQ have not been validated for off-reserve First Nations, Métis and Inuit children in Canada. The first objective of this evaluation is to examine if the five subscales of the SDQ demonstrate construct validity and reliability for off-reserve First Nations, Métis and Inuit children. The second objective is to examine if an alternative set of subscales, using the 25 SDQ items, may be more valid and reliable for off-reserve First Nations, Métis and Inuit children.

    Release date: 2009-11-25

  • Articles and reports: 89-599-M2009006
    Description:

    This study used data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) to provide a picture of Canadian 9-year-old children at the transition between the primary grades and the junior grades in school. The children varied widely in their academic achievement, and some of these variations were linked to their gender, their family income level, and their province of residence. Marked differences were also found in the education environments of children, linked most consistently to family income levels. These education environments were not linked to academic success as measured by mathematics achievement at school. Academic achievement at age 9 was significantly related to school readiness four years earlier.

    Release date: 2009-09-25

  • Articles and reports: 89-634-X2008002
    Description:

    This is one of three fact sheets in the series using information from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) and 2006 Census. The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide information on the topics of family (persons involved in raising children, size of families, age of parents, lone parent families), socio-economic status (low-income economic families), feelings about community (as a place to raise children), and cultural activities (participation in traditional activities, having someone to help the child understand Métis history and culture, cultural activities in child care) for Métis children under six years of age.

    Release date: 2008-11-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-634-X2008003
    Description:

    This is one of three fact sheets in the series using information from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) and 2006 Census. The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide information on the topics of family (persons involved in raising children, size of families, age of parents, lone parent families, living with grandparents), socio-economic status (low-income economic families), feelings about community (as a place to raise children), and cultural activities (participation in traditional activities, having someone to help the child understand First Nations history and culture, cultural activities in child care) for First Nations children under six years of age living off reserve.

    Release date: 2008-11-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-634-X2008004
    Description:

    This is one of three fact sheets in the series using information from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) and 2006 Census. The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide information on the topics of family (persons involved in raising children, size of families, age of parents, adoption, living with grandparents), housing conditions (crowding, dwellings in need of major repairs, levels of satisfaction with housing conditions), feelings about community (facilities), and cultural activities (participation in traditional activities, having someone to help the child understand Inuit history and culture, cultural activities in child care). Results are presented for all Inuit children. Some results are also presented for those in Inuit Nunaat (meaning Inuit homeland): Nunatsiavut in northern Labrador, the territory of Nunavut, Nunavik in northern Quebec, and the Inuvialuit Settlement Region in the Northwest Territories.

    Release date: 2008-11-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-634-X200800210722
    Description:

    This is one of three fact sheets in the series using information from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) and 2006 Census. The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide information on the topics of family (persons involved in raising children, size of families, age of parents, lone parent families), socio-economic status (low-income economic families), feelings about community (as a place to raise children), and cultural activities (participation in traditional activities, having someone to help the child understand Métis history and culture, cultural activities in child care) for Métis children under six years of age.

    Release date: 2008-11-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-634-X200800410724
    Description:

    This is one of three fact sheets in the series using information from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) and 2006 Census. The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide information on the topics of family (persons involved in raising children, size of families, age of parents, adoption, living with grandparents), housing conditions (crowding, dwellings in need of major repairs, levels of satisfaction with housing conditions), feelings about community (facilities), and cultural activities (participation in traditional activities, having someone to help the child understand Inuit history and culture, cultural activities in child care). Results are presented for all Inuit children. Some results are also presented for those in Inuit Nunaat (meaning Inuit homeland): Nunatsiavut in northern Labrador, the territory of Nunavut, Nunavik in northern Quebec, and the Inuvialuit Settlement Region in the Northwest Territories.

    Release date: 2008-11-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-634-X200800310723
    Description:

    This is one of three fact sheets in the series using information from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) and 2006 Census. The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide information on the topics of family (persons involved in raising children, size of families, age of parents, lone parent families, living with grandparents), socio-economic status (low-income economic families), feelings about community (as a place to raise children), and cultural activities (participation in traditional activities, having someone to help the child understand First Nations history and culture, cultural activities in child care) for First Nations children under 6 years of age living off reserve.

    Release date: 2008-11-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-634-X2008001
    Description:

    Using data from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) and the 2006 Census, this paper examines the topics of family, community, and child care of Aboriginal (off-reserve First Nations, Métis and Inuit) children under six years of age. The paper explores issues such as family characteristics (size of families, age of parents, living with grandparents, persons involved in raising young Aboriginal children, Aboriginal children living in low-income economic families), feelings about community, cultural activities and child care arrangements. It is designed as a starting point to understanding the social and living conditions in which young Aboriginal children are learning and growing. The report is divided into three parts: First Nations children living off reserve, Métis children, and Inuit children.

    Release date: 2008-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 89-634-X2008005
    Description:

    A series of supporting data tables accompany the analytical article from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS). These supporting data tables provide data at the provincial/regional level for Aboriginal, off-reserve First Nations, Métis and Inuit children under 6 years old for major themes covered in the analytical article: How often the child talks or plays together with different people, focusing attention on each other for five minutes or more; Feelings about home and daily life (housing conditions; support network from family, friends, or others; main job or activity; way spend free time; finances); Feelings about community (as a place with good schools, nursery schools and early childhood education programs; as a place with adequate facilities for children for example, community centres, rinks, gyms, parks; as a safe community; as a place with health facilities; as a place with actively involved members of the community; as a place with First Nations, Métis and Inuit cultural activities); Child care arrangements (percentage of children in child care; percentage of children in a child care arrangement that provides learning opportunities; percentage of children in a child care arrangement that promotes traditional and cultural values and customs); and, Percentage of children living in low-income families.

    Release date: 2008-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 89-599-M2008005
    Description:

    This study uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) to examine the relationship between late childbearing (at or after age 35) among first-time mothers in Canada and three facets of development: physical health, behaviour and cognitive development. The following research questions were addressed: do the developmental characteristics of children born to older mothers differ from those of children born to younger mothers? And do other factors, such as demographic characteristics and parenting practices, account for differences in child development by maternal age at birth? For this analysis, first-born children were identified from among all interviewed children whose year of birth was between 1998 and 2005.

    Release date: 2008-09-24

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20060059588
    Description:

    Today, disability is viewed more often as a social construct than a medical one. Educational reforms have changed the way in which children with disabilities are integrated into the school system. With data from the 2001 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey, this article looks at the prevalence of children with disabilities, whether they attend regular classes and the kind of conditions for which they need special services. It examines the issues about access to educational services needed : which services are most needed and used, and what barriers may get in the way of obtaining such services.

    Release date: 2007-02-26

  • Articles and reports: 89-599-M2006004
    Description:

    This report provides an overview of Canadian children as they enter school as 5-year-olds. It looks at the collection of abilities, behaviours and attitudes that they bring with them, attributes that are important for early school achievement. The report shows that children vary on some dimensions of readiness to learn at school, according to their family characteristics, their background and their home environment and experiences. It also shows that some of the differences in readiness to learn may already be evident two years earlier, when the children were 3 years old. Finally, the report indicates factors in the home environment that may contribute to differences among different economic groups. The report adds to what we know about readiness to learn. It provides information that may be useful for policy analysts, teachers, researchers, and parents themselves as they work toward maximizing the potential of preschool children everywhere.

    Release date: 2006-11-27

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20060019197
    Description:

    This paper uses Canadian data from the 2002 and 2003 National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth to examine the levels of altruism or prosocial behaviour, anxiety or emotional disorder, and physical aggression or conduct disorder for children aged 8 to 11 with and without learning disabilities, controlling for characteristics of the child, the family and parenting style. Children were identified as having learning disabilities if they were diagnosed as having this long-term condition by a health professional.

    Release date: 2006-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006281
    Description:

    This research paper examines whether various measures of family income are associated with the cognitive, social/emotional, physical and behavioural development of children. Data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth were used to assess a range of measures of well-being among children aged 4-15 in 1998, whose family composition remained unchanged between 1994 and 1998. The study finds that regardless of age or how income is measured, higher family income is almost always associated with better child well-being. Among children in lower income families, incremental increases in household income are found to be associated with better child development outcomes. Increases in income continue to remain associated with better well-being, even once children are out of low income. In fact, the study does not find a point above which high income ceases to benefit children's development. In particular, children's cognitive and behavioural development measures appear to have the strongest associations with levels of family income.

    The results show that changes in family income appear to be less important for child outcomes than levels of family income for 8-11- and 12-15-year-olds. However, for the 4-7-year-old group, changes in family income are more important ' particularly for emotional development scores. Analysis from the Youth in Transition Survey also finds similar relationships between the socio-economic status of the family and the developmental outcomes of children.

    Release date: 2006-05-11

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2005261
    Description:

    The upbringing of children is modeled as a modified principal agent problem in which children attempt to maximize their own well-being when faced with a parenting strategy chosen by the parent, to maximize parent's perception of family well-being. Thus, children as well as parents are players, but children have higher discount rates than parents. The simultaneity of parenting and child behaviour is confirmed using the 1994 Canadian National Longitudinal Survey of Children.

    Release date: 2005-08-02

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S20030006692
    Description:

    The gender gap emerges as an important issue in this article, which studies links between self-worth and sense of control in adolescence, and mental and physical health over the next several years. Health outcomes in young adulthood are analyzed in relation to positive and negative self-concept in adolescence, and differences between the sexes are highlighted.

    Release date: 2003-10-31

Reference (8)

Reference (8) (8 of 8 results)

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