Statistics by subject – Children and youth

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All (16)

All (16) (16 of 16 results)

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201700154879
    Description:

    This annual Juristat article presents 2016 homicide data. Short and long-term trends in homicide are examined at the national, provincial/territorial and census metropolitan area levels. Gang-related homicides, firearm-related homicides, intimate partner homicides, and homicides committed by youth are also explored.

    Release date: 2017-11-22

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201300111803
    Description:

    This Juristat examines the number and types of cases completed in youth courts on an annual basis. Characteristics of youth accused, case decisions, types of sentences imposed and case completion times are also explored. Data are presented at both the national and provincial/territorial levels.

    Release date: 2013-06-13

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201100111523
    Description:

    This report presents information on the short and long-term trends in police-reported crime at the national, provincial/territorial and census metropolitan area levels. It includes information on both the volume and the severity of overall, violent and non-violent crime as well as data on crimes committed by youths aged 12 to 17.

    Release date: 2011-07-21

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200800710658
    Description:

    The annual report on crime statistics presents an analysis of the police-reported data in 2007. These data are presented within the context of both short and long term trends. Data are examined at the national, provincial and territorial levels, as well as for major metropolitan areas by type of crime. The report distinguishes between violent crime, property crime, other Criminal Code offences, impaired driving, drug offences and youth crime.

    Release date: 2008-07-17

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20050068650
    Description:

    This annual report is an examination of homicide in Canada. Detailed information is presented on the characteristics of homicide incidents (murder, manslaughter and infanticide), victims and accused within the context of both short and long-term trends. Geographical patterns of homicide are examined at the national and provincial/territorial levels, as well as for major metropolitan areas. Other key themes include international comparisons of homicide, gang-related homicides, firearm-related homicides, youth homicide and family (including spousal) homicides. The data are intended to respond to the needs of those who work in the criminal justice system as well as to inform researchers, policy analysts, academics, the media and the public on the nature and extent of homicide in Canada.

    Release date: 2005-10-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030036704
    Description:

    This article examines the potential pool of healthcare practitioners who use French at work, as well as those who do not regularly use French in the workplace but who have knowledge of that language, and compares it with the French-speaking population.

    Release date: 2003-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20020038373
    Description:

    In 2000/01, 99,590 cases were processed in the youth courts of Canada. This represents a 2% decrease in the number of cases processed from the previous year and a decrease of 10% from 1996/97.

    The number of Property crime cases heard in youth courts decreased annually, dropping 23% between 1996/97 and 2000/01. The number of Violent crime cases has dropped by 6% since 1996/97. The number of Drug-related cases has increased by 30% since 1996/97.

    Release date: 2002-03-21

  • Table: 85-224-X20010006461
    Description:

    The reactions of children who witness violence by one parent against the other can include emotional, social, cognitive, physical and behavioural maladjustment problems (Jaffe, Wolfe and Wilson 1990). These children tend to show lower levels of social competence; higher rates of depression, worry and frustration; and are more likely than other children to develop stress-related disorders and to show lower levels of empathy (Fantuzzo, et al. 1991; Graham-Bermann and Levendosky 1998; Moore and Pepler 1998; Edleson 1999b).

    Release date: 2001-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010068392
    Description:

    This Juristat presents estimates of the number of children in Canada who have witnessed violence in their homes in recent years, and compares the characteristics of these children and their families to children who have not witnessed violence. This analysis also examines links between witnessing violence and behavioural outcomes among children.Estimates of the extent of family violence witnessed by children in Canada are available through three national surveys conducted by Statistics Canada: the 1999 General Social Survey on Victimization, the 1993 Violence Against Women Survey, and the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth. The GSS and the VAWS are victimization surveys that ask a random sample of adults (men and women in the case of the GSS and women only in the case of the VAWS) about their experiences of spousal violence and whether their children witnessed the violence. In the NLSCY, a random sample of children are selected and the person most knowledgeable about the child responds to a wide range of questions about the child and the household, including whether the child sees adults or teenagers in the home physically fighting, hitting or otherwise trying to hurt others.

    Release date: 2001-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010048390
    Description:

    Using data from the 1994/95 and 1996/97 National Longitudinal Survey on Children and Youth, this Juristat examines problem behaviour and delinquency as reported by a representative sample of youths between 10 and 13 years of age. Specifically four different issues are explored. First, the demographic variation in delinquency is assessed. Second, to understand life-course trajectories of children and youth involved in aggressive behaviour and delinquent acts against property, stability in delinquency is examined. Third, to understand why young people commit offences, it is important to differentiate aggressive behaviour from other types of delinquency. Therefore, the relationship between aggressive behaviour and delinquent acts against property is examined. Finally, the most common risk factors in childhood and early adolescence are presented.

    Release date: 2001-06-12

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010038389
    Description:

    In 1999/00, 102,000 cases were processed in the youth courts of Canada. This represents a 4% decrease from the previous year and a decrease of 11% from 1992/93. It also represents a 17% decrease in the number of cases per 10,000 youths from 1992/93; since that year, the rate has dropped from 500 cases to 417 cases.

    From 1992/93 to 1999/00, the rate of property crime cases decreased annually, dropping 38% over this period. The rate of violent crime cases has dropped by 3% since 1998/99, yet remains at the same level reported in 1992/93.

    Release date: 2001-05-30

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19990014700
    Description:

    Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth, this article studies the links between academic achievement, children's views of themselves, and adults' support during the transition to early adolescence.

    Release date: 1999-10-12

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19990014698
    Description:

    This paper presents the results and recommendations of UNESCO's International Commission on Education for the 21st Century. It was presented at the Third National Forum on Education in St. John's, Newfoundland in May 1998.

    Release date: 1999-10-12

  • Articles and reports: 89-553-X19980014024
    Description:

    In this chapter, we assess the family's role in determining the acquisition of higher education and literacy. More specifically, our objective is to relate individual educational attainment, literacy abilities, and labour market characteristics to parental educational and labour market attributes. We compare different age cohorts and thereby examine relationships between parents and children over more than one generation.

    Release date: 1998-11-05

  • Articles and reports: 89-553-X19980014023
    Description:

    The primary goal of this chapter is to improve our understanding of the roles that family structure and low-income play in the determination of psychiatric disorders, poor school performance, and social problems among Canadian children. While there is broad agreement that environmental factors have an impact on these outcomes, until recently there has been little or no Canadian data with which to assess the importance of socio-economic factors in determining the incidence and severity of such problems.

    Release date: 1998-11-05

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950031638
    Description:

    Does graduation from a university co-op program provide advantages in the job market? A comparison of graduates of university co-op programs with their non co-op counterparts.

    Release date: 1995-09-05

Data (1)

Data (1) (1 result)

  • Table: 85-224-X20010006461
    Description:

    The reactions of children who witness violence by one parent against the other can include emotional, social, cognitive, physical and behavioural maladjustment problems (Jaffe, Wolfe and Wilson 1990). These children tend to show lower levels of social competence; higher rates of depression, worry and frustration; and are more likely than other children to develop stress-related disorders and to show lower levels of empathy (Fantuzzo, et al. 1991; Graham-Bermann and Levendosky 1998; Moore and Pepler 1998; Edleson 1999b).

    Release date: 2001-06-28

Analysis (15)

Analysis (15) (15 of 15 results)

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201700154879
    Description:

    This annual Juristat article presents 2016 homicide data. Short and long-term trends in homicide are examined at the national, provincial/territorial and census metropolitan area levels. Gang-related homicides, firearm-related homicides, intimate partner homicides, and homicides committed by youth are also explored.

    Release date: 2017-11-22

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201300111803
    Description:

    This Juristat examines the number and types of cases completed in youth courts on an annual basis. Characteristics of youth accused, case decisions, types of sentences imposed and case completion times are also explored. Data are presented at both the national and provincial/territorial levels.

    Release date: 2013-06-13

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201100111523
    Description:

    This report presents information on the short and long-term trends in police-reported crime at the national, provincial/territorial and census metropolitan area levels. It includes information on both the volume and the severity of overall, violent and non-violent crime as well as data on crimes committed by youths aged 12 to 17.

    Release date: 2011-07-21

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200800710658
    Description:

    The annual report on crime statistics presents an analysis of the police-reported data in 2007. These data are presented within the context of both short and long term trends. Data are examined at the national, provincial and territorial levels, as well as for major metropolitan areas by type of crime. The report distinguishes between violent crime, property crime, other Criminal Code offences, impaired driving, drug offences and youth crime.

    Release date: 2008-07-17

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20050068650
    Description:

    This annual report is an examination of homicide in Canada. Detailed information is presented on the characteristics of homicide incidents (murder, manslaughter and infanticide), victims and accused within the context of both short and long-term trends. Geographical patterns of homicide are examined at the national and provincial/territorial levels, as well as for major metropolitan areas. Other key themes include international comparisons of homicide, gang-related homicides, firearm-related homicides, youth homicide and family (including spousal) homicides. The data are intended to respond to the needs of those who work in the criminal justice system as well as to inform researchers, policy analysts, academics, the media and the public on the nature and extent of homicide in Canada.

    Release date: 2005-10-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030036704
    Description:

    This article examines the potential pool of healthcare practitioners who use French at work, as well as those who do not regularly use French in the workplace but who have knowledge of that language, and compares it with the French-speaking population.

    Release date: 2003-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20020038373
    Description:

    In 2000/01, 99,590 cases were processed in the youth courts of Canada. This represents a 2% decrease in the number of cases processed from the previous year and a decrease of 10% from 1996/97.

    The number of Property crime cases heard in youth courts decreased annually, dropping 23% between 1996/97 and 2000/01. The number of Violent crime cases has dropped by 6% since 1996/97. The number of Drug-related cases has increased by 30% since 1996/97.

    Release date: 2002-03-21

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010068392
    Description:

    This Juristat presents estimates of the number of children in Canada who have witnessed violence in their homes in recent years, and compares the characteristics of these children and their families to children who have not witnessed violence. This analysis also examines links between witnessing violence and behavioural outcomes among children.Estimates of the extent of family violence witnessed by children in Canada are available through three national surveys conducted by Statistics Canada: the 1999 General Social Survey on Victimization, the 1993 Violence Against Women Survey, and the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth. The GSS and the VAWS are victimization surveys that ask a random sample of adults (men and women in the case of the GSS and women only in the case of the VAWS) about their experiences of spousal violence and whether their children witnessed the violence. In the NLSCY, a random sample of children are selected and the person most knowledgeable about the child responds to a wide range of questions about the child and the household, including whether the child sees adults or teenagers in the home physically fighting, hitting or otherwise trying to hurt others.

    Release date: 2001-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010048390
    Description:

    Using data from the 1994/95 and 1996/97 National Longitudinal Survey on Children and Youth, this Juristat examines problem behaviour and delinquency as reported by a representative sample of youths between 10 and 13 years of age. Specifically four different issues are explored. First, the demographic variation in delinquency is assessed. Second, to understand life-course trajectories of children and youth involved in aggressive behaviour and delinquent acts against property, stability in delinquency is examined. Third, to understand why young people commit offences, it is important to differentiate aggressive behaviour from other types of delinquency. Therefore, the relationship between aggressive behaviour and delinquent acts against property is examined. Finally, the most common risk factors in childhood and early adolescence are presented.

    Release date: 2001-06-12

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010038389
    Description:

    In 1999/00, 102,000 cases were processed in the youth courts of Canada. This represents a 4% decrease from the previous year and a decrease of 11% from 1992/93. It also represents a 17% decrease in the number of cases per 10,000 youths from 1992/93; since that year, the rate has dropped from 500 cases to 417 cases.

    From 1992/93 to 1999/00, the rate of property crime cases decreased annually, dropping 38% over this period. The rate of violent crime cases has dropped by 3% since 1998/99, yet remains at the same level reported in 1992/93.

    Release date: 2001-05-30

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19990014700
    Description:

    Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth, this article studies the links between academic achievement, children's views of themselves, and adults' support during the transition to early adolescence.

    Release date: 1999-10-12

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19990014698
    Description:

    This paper presents the results and recommendations of UNESCO's International Commission on Education for the 21st Century. It was presented at the Third National Forum on Education in St. John's, Newfoundland in May 1998.

    Release date: 1999-10-12

  • Articles and reports: 89-553-X19980014024
    Description:

    In this chapter, we assess the family's role in determining the acquisition of higher education and literacy. More specifically, our objective is to relate individual educational attainment, literacy abilities, and labour market characteristics to parental educational and labour market attributes. We compare different age cohorts and thereby examine relationships between parents and children over more than one generation.

    Release date: 1998-11-05

  • Articles and reports: 89-553-X19980014023
    Description:

    The primary goal of this chapter is to improve our understanding of the roles that family structure and low-income play in the determination of psychiatric disorders, poor school performance, and social problems among Canadian children. While there is broad agreement that environmental factors have an impact on these outcomes, until recently there has been little or no Canadian data with which to assess the importance of socio-economic factors in determining the incidence and severity of such problems.

    Release date: 1998-11-05

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19950031638
    Description:

    Does graduation from a university co-op program provide advantages in the job market? A comparison of graduates of university co-op programs with their non co-op counterparts.

    Release date: 1995-09-05

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