Statistics by subject – Children and youth

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All (9)

All (9) (9 of 9 results)

  • Articles and reports: 82-624-X201100111506
    Description:

    This article is an overview of injuries featuring results from the 2009-2010 Canadian Community Health Survey. With a focus on broad age groups, it explores various aspects of this topic such as who gets injured, main causes, and types of injuries.

    Release date: 2011-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201100111397
    Description:

    This article describes levels of accelerometer-measured activity in Canadian children and youth by age, sex and body weight status.

    Release date: 2011-01-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000111142
    Description:

    Métis peoples make up one third of the Aboriginal population in Canada (about 390,000 people in 2006). Using the 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (15 and older) and Métis Supplement this article explores various cultural activities of the Métis population. More specifically, it considers involvement in traditional activities, such as: arts and crafts, hunting, fishing, trapping, and gathering wild vegetation. It also explores Aboriginal language use, involvement in Métis-specific organizations, and spiritual and religious practices. Findings are presented by sex, age, and region.

    Release date: 2010-04-20

  • Table: 85-224-X20010006461
    Description:

    The reactions of children who witness violence by one parent against the other can include emotional, social, cognitive, physical and behavioural maladjustment problems (Jaffe, Wolfe and Wilson 1990). These children tend to show lower levels of social competence; higher rates of depression, worry and frustration; and are more likely than other children to develop stress-related disorders and to show lower levels of empathy (Fantuzzo, et al. 1991; Graham-Bermann and Levendosky 1998; Moore and Pepler 1998; Edleson 1999b).

    Release date: 2001-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010068392
    Description:

    This Juristat presents estimates of the number of children in Canada who have witnessed violence in their homes in recent years, and compares the characteristics of these children and their families to children who have not witnessed violence. This analysis also examines links between witnessing violence and behavioural outcomes among children.Estimates of the extent of family violence witnessed by children in Canada are available through three national surveys conducted by Statistics Canada: the 1999 General Social Survey on Victimization, the 1993 Violence Against Women Survey, and the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth. The GSS and the VAWS are victimization surveys that ask a random sample of adults (men and women in the case of the GSS and women only in the case of the VAWS) about their experiences of spousal violence and whether their children witnessed the violence. In the NLSCY, a random sample of children are selected and the person most knowledgeable about the child responds to a wide range of questions about the child and the household, including whether the child sees adults or teenagers in the home physically fighting, hitting or otherwise trying to hurt others.

    Release date: 2001-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010048390
    Description:

    Using data from the 1994/95 and 1996/97 National Longitudinal Survey on Children and Youth, this Juristat examines problem behaviour and delinquency as reported by a representative sample of youths between 10 and 13 years of age. Specifically four different issues are explored. First, the demographic variation in delinquency is assessed. Second, to understand life-course trajectories of children and youth involved in aggressive behaviour and delinquent acts against property, stability in delinquency is examined. Third, to understand why young people commit offences, it is important to differentiate aggressive behaviour from other types of delinquency. Therefore, the relationship between aggressive behaviour and delinquent acts against property is examined. Finally, the most common risk factors in childhood and early adolescence are presented.

    Release date: 2001-06-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20000015087
    Description:

    This article considers the degree to which organized activities in youth may influence community involvement in adulthood.

    Release date: 2000-06-13

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19990024898
    Description:

    This article explores children's academic achievement, behaviour, classroom environment and other school-related experiences, using the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY).

    Release date: 2000-03-07

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990024658
    Description:

    This article addresses some questions about the religious observance of children under 12 years.

    Release date: 1999-09-09

Data (1)

Data (1) (1 result)

  • Table: 85-224-X20010006461
    Description:

    The reactions of children who witness violence by one parent against the other can include emotional, social, cognitive, physical and behavioural maladjustment problems (Jaffe, Wolfe and Wilson 1990). These children tend to show lower levels of social competence; higher rates of depression, worry and frustration; and are more likely than other children to develop stress-related disorders and to show lower levels of empathy (Fantuzzo, et al. 1991; Graham-Bermann and Levendosky 1998; Moore and Pepler 1998; Edleson 1999b).

    Release date: 2001-06-28

Analysis (8)

Analysis (8) (8 of 8 results)

  • Articles and reports: 82-624-X201100111506
    Description:

    This article is an overview of injuries featuring results from the 2009-2010 Canadian Community Health Survey. With a focus on broad age groups, it explores various aspects of this topic such as who gets injured, main causes, and types of injuries.

    Release date: 2011-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X201100111397
    Description:

    This article describes levels of accelerometer-measured activity in Canadian children and youth by age, sex and body weight status.

    Release date: 2011-01-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000111142
    Description:

    Métis peoples make up one third of the Aboriginal population in Canada (about 390,000 people in 2006). Using the 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (15 and older) and Métis Supplement this article explores various cultural activities of the Métis population. More specifically, it considers involvement in traditional activities, such as: arts and crafts, hunting, fishing, trapping, and gathering wild vegetation. It also explores Aboriginal language use, involvement in Métis-specific organizations, and spiritual and religious practices. Findings are presented by sex, age, and region.

    Release date: 2010-04-20

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010068392
    Description:

    This Juristat presents estimates of the number of children in Canada who have witnessed violence in their homes in recent years, and compares the characteristics of these children and their families to children who have not witnessed violence. This analysis also examines links between witnessing violence and behavioural outcomes among children.Estimates of the extent of family violence witnessed by children in Canada are available through three national surveys conducted by Statistics Canada: the 1999 General Social Survey on Victimization, the 1993 Violence Against Women Survey, and the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth. The GSS and the VAWS are victimization surveys that ask a random sample of adults (men and women in the case of the GSS and women only in the case of the VAWS) about their experiences of spousal violence and whether their children witnessed the violence. In the NLSCY, a random sample of children are selected and the person most knowledgeable about the child responds to a wide range of questions about the child and the household, including whether the child sees adults or teenagers in the home physically fighting, hitting or otherwise trying to hurt others.

    Release date: 2001-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010048390
    Description:

    Using data from the 1994/95 and 1996/97 National Longitudinal Survey on Children and Youth, this Juristat examines problem behaviour and delinquency as reported by a representative sample of youths between 10 and 13 years of age. Specifically four different issues are explored. First, the demographic variation in delinquency is assessed. Second, to understand life-course trajectories of children and youth involved in aggressive behaviour and delinquent acts against property, stability in delinquency is examined. Third, to understand why young people commit offences, it is important to differentiate aggressive behaviour from other types of delinquency. Therefore, the relationship between aggressive behaviour and delinquent acts against property is examined. Finally, the most common risk factors in childhood and early adolescence are presented.

    Release date: 2001-06-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20000015087
    Description:

    This article considers the degree to which organized activities in youth may influence community involvement in adulthood.

    Release date: 2000-06-13

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X19990024898
    Description:

    This article explores children's academic achievement, behaviour, classroom environment and other school-related experiences, using the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY).

    Release date: 2000-03-07

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990024658
    Description:

    This article addresses some questions about the religious observance of children under 12 years.

    Release date: 1999-09-09

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