Statistics by subject – Children and youth

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All (25)

All (25) (25 of 25 results)

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010128398
    Description:

    This Juristat presents and analyzes information on young offender admissions to custody and community services, with breakdowns by custody (secure custody, open custody, remand) and probation, and key case characteristics such as age, sex, Aboriginal/non-Aboriginal status, and most serious offence. In addition, it includes data pertaining to releases from remand, secure custody, and open custody by sex and time served. These breakdowns are presented and analyzed at the national and provincial/territorial level.

    Data summarized in this Juristat are primarily drawn from the national Youth Custody and Community Services (YCCS) Survey. The scope of the survey is to collect and analyze information on the application of dispositions under the Young Offenders Act from provincial and territorial agencies responsible for youth corrections and programs.

    Release date: 2001-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001178
    Description:

    The school performance of the children of immigrants in the Canadian school system is analyzed using data from the first three waves of the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY). School performance is measured in terms of ability at reading, writing, mathematics and overall aptitude. The parents' and teachers' assessments of the children's performances are used, as are the results of formal testing. On average, children of immigrants generally do at least as well as the children of the Canadian-born along each dimension of school performance. The children of immigrant parents whose first language is either English or French have especially high outcomes. The children of other immigrant parents have lower performance in reading, writing and composition but their performance in mathematics is comparable to that of the children of Canadian-born parents. It is also found that with more years in the Canadian education system, the performance of these children in reading, writing and mathematics improves and is equal to or greater than the performance of the children of Canadian-born parents by age thirteen in virtually all areas of performance.

    Release date: 2001-11-14

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010098395
    Description:

    This series of reports provides detailed statistics and analysis on a variety of topics and issues concerning Canada's justice system. Annual Juristats are produced on areas such as: crime, homicide, youth and adult courts, and corrections. Additional Juristats are also produced each year on current topics of interest to the justice community. This is a unique periodical, of great interest to those who have to plan, establish, administer and evaluate justice programs and projects, or anyone who has an interest in Canada's justice system.

    Release date: 2001-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001171
    Description:

    A framework for thinking about intergenerational mobility as it relates to the relationship between parent and child incomes as well as evidence on the degree and sources of intergenerational mobility in Canada is reviewed. The major conclusion is that Canadian society is characterized by a good deal of intergenerational mobility, and the available evidence suggests that being raised in low-income does not pre-ordain children to low-income in adulthood. Canada compares well in this regard to many other countries, being characterized on average by more mobility than the U.S. or U.K. and on a par with some of the most mobile nations. The sources for this pattern have to do with access to high quality education, and high quality non-monetary investments in children. However, there is no clear evidence linking the level of family income to the nature of these investments.

    Release date: 2001-10-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20010025821
    Description:

    This article examines the extent to which children have access to the Internet at home. It focuses on parents' knowledge of their children's use of the Net, the factors that contribute to or limit access, parental concerns about privacy, and the limitations parents place on using the Internet.

    Release date: 2001-09-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20010025819
    Description:

    This article examines whether adults who experienced change in their parental structure regard their childhood as happy and if they were less close to their parents than children whose families remained intact.

    Release date: 2001-09-11

  • Articles and reports: 85-553-X19990015808
    Description:

    Using the results of the 1999 General Social Survey (GSS) on Victimization, this chapter examines the characteristics of those who are at greatest risk of violent victimization and the environment in which these incidents occur.

    Release date: 2001-08-08

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010068392
    Description:

    This Juristat presents estimates of the number of children in Canada who have witnessed violence in their homes in recent years, and compares the characteristics of these children and their families to children who have not witnessed violence. This analysis also examines links between witnessing violence and behavioural outcomes among children.Estimates of the extent of family violence witnessed by children in Canada are available through three national surveys conducted by Statistics Canada: the 1999 General Social Survey on Victimization, the 1993 Violence Against Women Survey, and the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth. The GSS and the VAWS are victimization surveys that ask a random sample of adults (men and women in the case of the GSS and women only in the case of the VAWS) about their experiences of spousal violence and whether their children witnessed the violence. In the NLSCY, a random sample of children are selected and the person most knowledgeable about the child responds to a wide range of questions about the child and the household, including whether the child sees adults or teenagers in the home physically fighting, hitting or otherwise trying to hurt others.

    Release date: 2001-06-28

  • Table: 85-224-X20010006461
    Description:

    The reactions of children who witness violence by one parent against the other can include emotional, social, cognitive, physical and behavioural maladjustment problems (Jaffe, Wolfe and Wilson 1990). These children tend to show lower levels of social competence; higher rates of depression, worry and frustration; and are more likely than other children to develop stress-related disorders and to show lower levels of empathy (Fantuzzo, et al. 1991; Graham-Bermann and Levendosky 1998; Moore and Pepler 1998; Edleson 1999b).

    Release date: 2001-06-28

  • Table: 85-224-X20010006460
    Description:

    Children and youth are most likely to be killed by family members. Of the 1,990 solved homicides of children and youth recorded by police in Canada between 1974 and 1999, family members were responsible for 63% of the deaths. The remaining solved homicides committed against children and youth were carried out by acquaintances and strangers (27% and 10%, respectively). In contrast, 50% of adults were killed by acquaintances, followed by family members (34%) and strangers (16%). Between 1974 and 1999, the annual rate of homicides of children and youth fluctuated from year to year, ranging from a high of 14 per million in 1981 to the previous low of 8 per million in 1993.

    Release date: 2001-06-28

  • Table: 85-224-X20010006463
    Description:

    One measure taken to assist abused women and their children leaving violent situations has been the development of an ample system of shelters. Shelters offer abused women and their children a temporary and safe place to live. Currently, shelters exist in every province and territory and they provide services to children and female victims of various types of abuse.

    Release date: 2001-06-28

  • Table: 85-224-X20010006459
    Description:

    The Canadian Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect (CIS) is the first national study on the incidence of child abuse and neglect reported to, and investigated by, child welfare services in Canada. Prior to this study, available data had been largely limited to police-reported incidents of assault and homicide. However, because of the secrecy that often surrounds cases of child abuse, many cases never come to the attention of the police.

    Release date: 2001-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20000005748
    Description:

    Several different analyses have considered the impact of family and demographic change on the economic conditions affecting children (Dooley, 1988, 1991; McQuillan, 1992; Picot and Myles, 1996). The present study updates this reserach to 1997, while shifting the emphasis to families with very young children.

    Release date: 2001-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2001005
    Description:

    This paper outlines the experience of children and youth in Canada as victims and offenders in the criminal justice system, using a mix of demographic, economic and justice data.

    Release date: 2001-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010048390
    Description:

    Using data from the 1994/95 and 1996/97 National Longitudinal Survey on Children and Youth, this Juristat examines problem behaviour and delinquency as reported by a representative sample of youths between 10 and 13 years of age. Specifically four different issues are explored. First, the demographic variation in delinquency is assessed. Second, to understand life-course trajectories of children and youth involved in aggressive behaviour and delinquent acts against property, stability in delinquency is examined. Third, to understand why young people commit offences, it is important to differentiate aggressive behaviour from other types of delinquency. Therefore, the relationship between aggressive behaviour and delinquent acts against property is examined. Finally, the most common risk factors in childhood and early adolescence are presented.

    Release date: 2001-06-12

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20000035717
    Description:

    This article examines the labour market outcomes of culture graduates at the university level.

    Release date: 2001-06-08

  • Public use microdata: 89M0015X
    Description:

    The National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY), developed jointly by Human Resources Development Canada and Statistics Canada, is a comprehensive survey which follows the development of children in Canada and paints a picture of their lives. The survey monitors children's development and measures the incidence of various factors that influence their development, both positively and negatively.

    Release date: 2001-05-30

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010038389
    Description:

    In 1999/00, 102,000 cases were processed in the youth courts of Canada. This represents a 4% decrease from the previous year and a decrease of 11% from 1992/93. It also represents a 17% decrease in the number of cases per 10,000 youths from 1992/93; since that year, the rate has dropped from 500 cases to 417 cases.

    From 1992/93 to 1999/00, the rate of property crime cases decreased annually, dropping 38% over this period. The rate of violent crime cases has dropped by 3% since 1998/99, yet remains at the same level reported in 1992/93.

    Release date: 2001-05-30

  • Technical products: 81-589-X20010015842
    Description:

    The central issues of Dr. Volpe's paper and presentation focussed on best practices of school-linked services and the reasons why school-linked services have been difficult to implement.

    Release date: 2001-05-22

  • Technical products: 81-589-X20010015849
    Description:

    Dr. Lupart's paper and presentation focussed on "gaps and limitations" in education for students with exceptional learning needs.

    Release date: 2001-05-22

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-588-X
    Description:

    The Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) is a longitudinal survey designed to provide policy-relevant information about school-work transitions and factors influencing pathways. YITS will provide vehicle for future research and analysis of major transitions in young people's lives, particularly those between education, training and work. Information obtained from, and research based on, the survey will help clarify the nature and causes of short and long-term challenges young people face in school-work transitions and support policy planning and decision making to help prevent or remedy these problems.

    Objectives of the Youth in Transition Survey were developed after an extensive consultation with stakeholders with an interest in youth and school-work transitions. Content includes measurement of major transitions in young people's lives including virtually all formal educational experiences and most labour-market experiences. Factors influencing transitions are also included family background, school experiences, achievement, aspirations and expectations, and employment experiences.

    The implementation plan encompasses a longitudinal survey for each of two age cohorts, to be surveyed every two years. Data from a cohort entering at age 15 will permit analysis of long-term school-work transition patterns. Data from a cohort entering at ages18-20 will provide more immediate, policy-relevant information on young adults in the labour market.

    Cycle one for the cohort aged 15 will include information collected from youth, their parents, and school principals. The sample design is a school-based frame that allows the selection of schools, and then individuals within schools. This design will permit analysis of school effects, a research domain not currently addressed by other Statistics Canada surveys. Methods of data collection include a self-completed questionnaire for youth and school principals, a telephone interview with parents, and assessment of youth competency in reading, science and mathematics as using self-completed test booklets provided under the integration of YITS with the OECD Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA). A pilot survey was conducted in April 1999 and the main survey took place in April-May 2000. Interviews were conducted with 30,000 students aged 15 from 1,000 schools in Canada. A telephone interview with parents of selected students took place in June 2000.

    The sample design for the cohort aged 18-20 is similar to that of the Labour-Force survey. The method of data collection is computer-assisted telephone interviewing. The pilot survey was conducted in January 1999. In January-February 2000, 23, 000 youth participated in the main survey data collection.

    Data from both cohorts is expected to be available in 2001. Following release of the first international report by the OECD/PISA project and the first national report, data will be publically available, permitting detailed exploration of content themes.

    Release date: 2001-04-11

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001155
    Description:

    This study examines prominent and emerging labour market trends of the 1990s to see if they have reversed under the pressure of the robust economic growth of 1997-1999. Specifically, it looks at the dramatic rise in self-employment, trends in job stability, and the low youth employment rate over the 1990s. The strong economic growth in 1997-1999 does not appear to have slowed the rise in self-employment, affected job stability, or dramatically increased youth employment rates. For self-employment this suggests that the rise in the 1990s was not primarily driven by slack labour demand forcing workers to create their own jobs. Job stability rose through much of the 1990s, pushed up by a low quit rate associated with low hiring. The best data currently available show that quit rates in particular have remained relatively low (given the position in the business cycle), and job tenure has remained high. There is little evidence that among paid workers job stability has deteriorated in the 1990s. Lagging youth employment rates were due in large part to an increased propensity for young persons to remain in school. Students have a lower employment rate, and a compositional shift towards more young students lowers the overall employment rate for youth. This propensity for the young to be students has not declined in 1997-1999, and as a result youth employment rates remain low by historical standards.

    Release date: 2001-04-04

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010018387
    Description:

    This report provides the most recent information from the 1999-2000 Transition Home Survey. It is a census survey of facilities providing residential services for abused women conducted every 2 years. Questionnaires are mailed to every known facility identified as providing residential services (shelter) to abused women in each province and territory. Information is collected on the characteristics of the facilities and the services provided during the previous 12 months. The survey also provides a one-day snapshot of the characteristics of women and children residing in shelters on a specific day. For the 1999-2000 survey, the snapshot day was April 17, 2000. In 1999-2000, 92% of shelters responded to the survey. Where possible, comparisons are made with the 1997-1998 Transition Home Survey.

    Release date: 2001-03-28

  • Technical products: 21-601-M2001044
    Description:

    This paper examines both rural - urban youth migration and interprovincial youth migration from 1971 to 1996. It also determines the impact over time of migration on the population age structure in rural and small town areas.

    Release date: 2001-02-12

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2000003
    Description:

    Although youth migration has been a popular subject in recent years, little research has focussed on the migration between rural and urban areas. Most of the research has concerned inter-provincial migration. In this bulletin, we consider the magnitude of both rural-urban migration and inter-provincial migration between 1971 and 1996 using population pyramids.

    Release date: 2001-02-07

Data (5)

Data (5) (5 of 5 results)

  • Table: 85-224-X20010006461
    Description:

    The reactions of children who witness violence by one parent against the other can include emotional, social, cognitive, physical and behavioural maladjustment problems (Jaffe, Wolfe and Wilson 1990). These children tend to show lower levels of social competence; higher rates of depression, worry and frustration; and are more likely than other children to develop stress-related disorders and to show lower levels of empathy (Fantuzzo, et al. 1991; Graham-Bermann and Levendosky 1998; Moore and Pepler 1998; Edleson 1999b).

    Release date: 2001-06-28

  • Table: 85-224-X20010006460
    Description:

    Children and youth are most likely to be killed by family members. Of the 1,990 solved homicides of children and youth recorded by police in Canada between 1974 and 1999, family members were responsible for 63% of the deaths. The remaining solved homicides committed against children and youth were carried out by acquaintances and strangers (27% and 10%, respectively). In contrast, 50% of adults were killed by acquaintances, followed by family members (34%) and strangers (16%). Between 1974 and 1999, the annual rate of homicides of children and youth fluctuated from year to year, ranging from a high of 14 per million in 1981 to the previous low of 8 per million in 1993.

    Release date: 2001-06-28

  • Table: 85-224-X20010006463
    Description:

    One measure taken to assist abused women and their children leaving violent situations has been the development of an ample system of shelters. Shelters offer abused women and their children a temporary and safe place to live. Currently, shelters exist in every province and territory and they provide services to children and female victims of various types of abuse.

    Release date: 2001-06-28

  • Table: 85-224-X20010006459
    Description:

    The Canadian Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect (CIS) is the first national study on the incidence of child abuse and neglect reported to, and investigated by, child welfare services in Canada. Prior to this study, available data had been largely limited to police-reported incidents of assault and homicide. However, because of the secrecy that often surrounds cases of child abuse, many cases never come to the attention of the police.

    Release date: 2001-06-28

  • Public use microdata: 89M0015X
    Description:

    The National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY), developed jointly by Human Resources Development Canada and Statistics Canada, is a comprehensive survey which follows the development of children in Canada and paints a picture of their lives. The survey monitors children's development and measures the incidence of various factors that influence their development, both positively and negatively.

    Release date: 2001-05-30

Analysis (16)

Analysis (16) (16 of 16 results)

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010128398
    Description:

    This Juristat presents and analyzes information on young offender admissions to custody and community services, with breakdowns by custody (secure custody, open custody, remand) and probation, and key case characteristics such as age, sex, Aboriginal/non-Aboriginal status, and most serious offence. In addition, it includes data pertaining to releases from remand, secure custody, and open custody by sex and time served. These breakdowns are presented and analyzed at the national and provincial/territorial level.

    Data summarized in this Juristat are primarily drawn from the national Youth Custody and Community Services (YCCS) Survey. The scope of the survey is to collect and analyze information on the application of dispositions under the Young Offenders Act from provincial and territorial agencies responsible for youth corrections and programs.

    Release date: 2001-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001178
    Description:

    The school performance of the children of immigrants in the Canadian school system is analyzed using data from the first three waves of the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY). School performance is measured in terms of ability at reading, writing, mathematics and overall aptitude. The parents' and teachers' assessments of the children's performances are used, as are the results of formal testing. On average, children of immigrants generally do at least as well as the children of the Canadian-born along each dimension of school performance. The children of immigrant parents whose first language is either English or French have especially high outcomes. The children of other immigrant parents have lower performance in reading, writing and composition but their performance in mathematics is comparable to that of the children of Canadian-born parents. It is also found that with more years in the Canadian education system, the performance of these children in reading, writing and mathematics improves and is equal to or greater than the performance of the children of Canadian-born parents by age thirteen in virtually all areas of performance.

    Release date: 2001-11-14

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010098395
    Description:

    This series of reports provides detailed statistics and analysis on a variety of topics and issues concerning Canada's justice system. Annual Juristats are produced on areas such as: crime, homicide, youth and adult courts, and corrections. Additional Juristats are also produced each year on current topics of interest to the justice community. This is a unique periodical, of great interest to those who have to plan, establish, administer and evaluate justice programs and projects, or anyone who has an interest in Canada's justice system.

    Release date: 2001-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001171
    Description:

    A framework for thinking about intergenerational mobility as it relates to the relationship between parent and child incomes as well as evidence on the degree and sources of intergenerational mobility in Canada is reviewed. The major conclusion is that Canadian society is characterized by a good deal of intergenerational mobility, and the available evidence suggests that being raised in low-income does not pre-ordain children to low-income in adulthood. Canada compares well in this regard to many other countries, being characterized on average by more mobility than the U.S. or U.K. and on a par with some of the most mobile nations. The sources for this pattern have to do with access to high quality education, and high quality non-monetary investments in children. However, there is no clear evidence linking the level of family income to the nature of these investments.

    Release date: 2001-10-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20010025821
    Description:

    This article examines the extent to which children have access to the Internet at home. It focuses on parents' knowledge of their children's use of the Net, the factors that contribute to or limit access, parental concerns about privacy, and the limitations parents place on using the Internet.

    Release date: 2001-09-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20010025819
    Description:

    This article examines whether adults who experienced change in their parental structure regard their childhood as happy and if they were less close to their parents than children whose families remained intact.

    Release date: 2001-09-11

  • Articles and reports: 85-553-X19990015808
    Description:

    Using the results of the 1999 General Social Survey (GSS) on Victimization, this chapter examines the characteristics of those who are at greatest risk of violent victimization and the environment in which these incidents occur.

    Release date: 2001-08-08

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010068392
    Description:

    This Juristat presents estimates of the number of children in Canada who have witnessed violence in their homes in recent years, and compares the characteristics of these children and their families to children who have not witnessed violence. This analysis also examines links between witnessing violence and behavioural outcomes among children.Estimates of the extent of family violence witnessed by children in Canada are available through three national surveys conducted by Statistics Canada: the 1999 General Social Survey on Victimization, the 1993 Violence Against Women Survey, and the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth. The GSS and the VAWS are victimization surveys that ask a random sample of adults (men and women in the case of the GSS and women only in the case of the VAWS) about their experiences of spousal violence and whether their children witnessed the violence. In the NLSCY, a random sample of children are selected and the person most knowledgeable about the child responds to a wide range of questions about the child and the household, including whether the child sees adults or teenagers in the home physically fighting, hitting or otherwise trying to hurt others.

    Release date: 2001-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 91-209-X20000005748
    Description:

    Several different analyses have considered the impact of family and demographic change on the economic conditions affecting children (Dooley, 1988, 1991; McQuillan, 1992; Picot and Myles, 1996). The present study updates this reserach to 1997, while shifting the emphasis to families with very young children.

    Release date: 2001-06-22

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2001005
    Description:

    This paper outlines the experience of children and youth in Canada as victims and offenders in the criminal justice system, using a mix of demographic, economic and justice data.

    Release date: 2001-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010048390
    Description:

    Using data from the 1994/95 and 1996/97 National Longitudinal Survey on Children and Youth, this Juristat examines problem behaviour and delinquency as reported by a representative sample of youths between 10 and 13 years of age. Specifically four different issues are explored. First, the demographic variation in delinquency is assessed. Second, to understand life-course trajectories of children and youth involved in aggressive behaviour and delinquent acts against property, stability in delinquency is examined. Third, to understand why young people commit offences, it is important to differentiate aggressive behaviour from other types of delinquency. Therefore, the relationship between aggressive behaviour and delinquent acts against property is examined. Finally, the most common risk factors in childhood and early adolescence are presented.

    Release date: 2001-06-12

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20000035717
    Description:

    This article examines the labour market outcomes of culture graduates at the university level.

    Release date: 2001-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010038389
    Description:

    In 1999/00, 102,000 cases were processed in the youth courts of Canada. This represents a 4% decrease from the previous year and a decrease of 11% from 1992/93. It also represents a 17% decrease in the number of cases per 10,000 youths from 1992/93; since that year, the rate has dropped from 500 cases to 417 cases.

    From 1992/93 to 1999/00, the rate of property crime cases decreased annually, dropping 38% over this period. The rate of violent crime cases has dropped by 3% since 1998/99, yet remains at the same level reported in 1992/93.

    Release date: 2001-05-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2001155
    Description:

    This study examines prominent and emerging labour market trends of the 1990s to see if they have reversed under the pressure of the robust economic growth of 1997-1999. Specifically, it looks at the dramatic rise in self-employment, trends in job stability, and the low youth employment rate over the 1990s. The strong economic growth in 1997-1999 does not appear to have slowed the rise in self-employment, affected job stability, or dramatically increased youth employment rates. For self-employment this suggests that the rise in the 1990s was not primarily driven by slack labour demand forcing workers to create their own jobs. Job stability rose through much of the 1990s, pushed up by a low quit rate associated with low hiring. The best data currently available show that quit rates in particular have remained relatively low (given the position in the business cycle), and job tenure has remained high. There is little evidence that among paid workers job stability has deteriorated in the 1990s. Lagging youth employment rates were due in large part to an increased propensity for young persons to remain in school. Students have a lower employment rate, and a compositional shift towards more young students lowers the overall employment rate for youth. This propensity for the young to be students has not declined in 1997-1999, and as a result youth employment rates remain low by historical standards.

    Release date: 2001-04-04

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010018387
    Description:

    This report provides the most recent information from the 1999-2000 Transition Home Survey. It is a census survey of facilities providing residential services for abused women conducted every 2 years. Questionnaires are mailed to every known facility identified as providing residential services (shelter) to abused women in each province and territory. Information is collected on the characteristics of the facilities and the services provided during the previous 12 months. The survey also provides a one-day snapshot of the characteristics of women and children residing in shelters on a specific day. For the 1999-2000 survey, the snapshot day was April 17, 2000. In 1999-2000, 92% of shelters responded to the survey. Where possible, comparisons are made with the 1997-1998 Transition Home Survey.

    Release date: 2001-03-28

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2000003
    Description:

    Although youth migration has been a popular subject in recent years, little research has focussed on the migration between rural and urban areas. Most of the research has concerned inter-provincial migration. In this bulletin, we consider the magnitude of both rural-urban migration and inter-provincial migration between 1971 and 1996 using population pyramids.

    Release date: 2001-02-07

Reference (4)

Reference (4) (4 of 4 results)

  • Technical products: 81-589-X20010015842
    Description:

    The central issues of Dr. Volpe's paper and presentation focussed on best practices of school-linked services and the reasons why school-linked services have been difficult to implement.

    Release date: 2001-05-22

  • Technical products: 81-589-X20010015849
    Description:

    Dr. Lupart's paper and presentation focussed on "gaps and limitations" in education for students with exceptional learning needs.

    Release date: 2001-05-22

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 81-588-X
    Description:

    The Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) is a longitudinal survey designed to provide policy-relevant information about school-work transitions and factors influencing pathways. YITS will provide vehicle for future research and analysis of major transitions in young people's lives, particularly those between education, training and work. Information obtained from, and research based on, the survey will help clarify the nature and causes of short and long-term challenges young people face in school-work transitions and support policy planning and decision making to help prevent or remedy these problems.

    Objectives of the Youth in Transition Survey were developed after an extensive consultation with stakeholders with an interest in youth and school-work transitions. Content includes measurement of major transitions in young people's lives including virtually all formal educational experiences and most labour-market experiences. Factors influencing transitions are also included family background, school experiences, achievement, aspirations and expectations, and employment experiences.

    The implementation plan encompasses a longitudinal survey for each of two age cohorts, to be surveyed every two years. Data from a cohort entering at age 15 will permit analysis of long-term school-work transition patterns. Data from a cohort entering at ages18-20 will provide more immediate, policy-relevant information on young adults in the labour market.

    Cycle one for the cohort aged 15 will include information collected from youth, their parents, and school principals. The sample design is a school-based frame that allows the selection of schools, and then individuals within schools. This design will permit analysis of school effects, a research domain not currently addressed by other Statistics Canada surveys. Methods of data collection include a self-completed questionnaire for youth and school principals, a telephone interview with parents, and assessment of youth competency in reading, science and mathematics as using self-completed test booklets provided under the integration of YITS with the OECD Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA). A pilot survey was conducted in April 1999 and the main survey took place in April-May 2000. Interviews were conducted with 30,000 students aged 15 from 1,000 schools in Canada. A telephone interview with parents of selected students took place in June 2000.

    The sample design for the cohort aged 18-20 is similar to that of the Labour-Force survey. The method of data collection is computer-assisted telephone interviewing. The pilot survey was conducted in January 1999. In January-February 2000, 23, 000 youth participated in the main survey data collection.

    Data from both cohorts is expected to be available in 2001. Following release of the first international report by the OECD/PISA project and the first national report, data will be publically available, permitting detailed exploration of content themes.

    Release date: 2001-04-11

  • Technical products: 21-601-M2001044
    Description:

    This paper examines both rural - urban youth migration and interprovincial youth migration from 1971 to 1996. It also determines the impact over time of migration on the population age structure in rural and small town areas.

    Release date: 2001-02-12

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