Statistics by subject – Children and youth

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All (15)

All (15) (15 of 15 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020036394
    Description:

    This article explores the demographic, social and economic characteristics of the underweight population.

    Release date: 2002-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020036393
    Description:

    This article looks at how people feel about their neighbourhood.

    Release date: 2002-12-17

  • Table: 89-579-X
    Description:

    The 2001 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS) is a post-censal survey of adults and children whose everyday activities are limited because of a condition or health problem. A sample of those persons who answered 'Yes' to the 2001 Census disability filter questions were included in the PALS survey population. Approximately 35,000 adults and 8,000 children living in private and some collective households in the 10 provinces were selected to participate in the survey. The data were collected after the 2001 Census, in the fall of 2001.

    These tables contain data on the number of adults and children with disabilities, disability rates, as well as the type and severity of disability, by age and sex, for Canada and the provinces.

    Release date: 2002-12-03

  • Table: 89-511-X
    Description:

    For youths, the ages 15 to 19 are a transition period. Most still live at home and a growing percentage are enrolled in academic institutions. At the same time, however, they are beginning to experience problems and characteristics usually associated with adult life. Many, for example, have begun to leave home; others are entering the labour market for the first time. Youths have the highest unemployment rate of any age group in the country. In addition, those who head families or live alone have very low incomes. These characteristics and others - demographic, family status, education, labour force characteristics, income, health, time-use patterns, criminal activity and victimization - are described in this report, which has drawn upon many sources.

    Release date: 2002-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002181
    Description:

    We use data from the Canadian National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth to address two questions. To what extent do parents and children agree when asked identical questions about child well-being? To what extent do differences in their responses affect what one infers from multivariate analysis of the data? The correspondence between parent and child in the assessment of child well-being is only slight to fair. Agreement is stronger for more observable outcomes, such as schooling performance, and weaker for less observable outcomes, such as emotional disorders. We regress both sets of responses on a standard set of socio-economic characteristics. We also conduct formal and informal tests of the differences in what one would infer from these two sets of regressions.

    Release date: 2002-10-23

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20020098428
    Description:

    The Juristat publication, "Pilot analysis of recidivism among convicted youth and young adults, 1999/00," summarizes trends from the provincial/territorial courts across Canada that provided data to the Adult Criminal Court Survey (ACCS) and the Youth Court Survey (YCS). This report attempts to gauge the prevalence of recidivism in young adults by examining the conviction histories of young adults convicted in Canadian criminal courts in 1999-2000. It also examines the transition from youth to adult offending, including patterns of re-offending, differences in conviction histories by age of onset and the impact of conviction history on court sentencing.

    Release date: 2002-10-23

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20020088416
    Description:

    This Juristat presents and analyzes information on young offender admissions to custody and community services, with breakdowns by custody (remand, secure, and open) and probation, and key case characteristics such as age, sex, Aboriginal/non-Aboriginal status, and most serious offence. In addition, it includes data pertaining to releases from remand, secure custody, and open custody by sex and time served. These breakdowns are presented and analyzed at the national and provincial/territorial level.

    Alternative measures refer to formalized programs across Canada through which persons who would otherwise proceed to court are dealt with via non-judicial sanctions. An analysis on alternative measures includes data pertaining to the participation and agreement by the youth to enter these community-based alternatives. The key case characteristics of this survey are similar to those collected by the Youth Custody and Community Services survey.

    The Youth Key Indicators describe average daily counts (caseload), which measure the volume of offenders held in custody or on probation on an average day. This information also provides an examination of youth incarceration and probation rates in Canada.

    Data summarized in this Juristat are primarily drawn from three perspectives: 1) The Youth Custody and Community Services (YCCS) survey. The scope of the survey is to collect and analyze information on the application of dispositions under the Young Offenders Act from provincial and territorial agencies responsible for youth corrections and programs. 2) The Alternative Measures survey, which collects and analyzes data on the number of agreements achieved and completed. And, 3) The Youth Key Indicator Report that measures the average counts of youth in custody (remand, secure and open) and on probation.

    Release date: 2002-10-09

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20020078417
    Description:

    This annual report is an examination of homicide in Canada. Detailed information is presented on the characteristics of homicide incidents (murder, manslaughter and infanticide), and, within the context of both short and long-term trends, the victims and accused. Geographical patterns of homicide are examined at the national and provincial/territorial levels, as well as for major metropolitan areas. Other key themes include international comparisons of homicide, gang-related homicides, firearm-related homicides, youth homicide and family (including spousal) homicides. The data are intended to respond to the needs of those who work in the criminal justice system, as well as to inform researchers, policy analysts, academics, the media and the public on the nature and extent of homicide in Canada.

    Release date: 2002-09-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020026349
    Description:

    This article examines suicide deaths and hospitalized suicide attempts among Canadians aged 10 years or older.

    Release date: 2002-09-17

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X2002040
    Description:

    The childcare services industry in Canada is unique in that it is entrusted with a precious resource: close to 1.4 million children. Childcare providers assist with the daunting tasks of promoting child development, ensuring children's safety and well-being, and maintaining responsive relationships with individual children.

    This paper examines the childcare services industry in Canada and is divided into three basic parts. First, the article studies the demand for childcare services, including the $3.5 billion spent by households for these services. The financial characteristics of the industry and the roles played by the non-profit sector and government fee-subsidy and grant programs are examined next. And the final section looks at some of the characteristics of the childcare workforce.

    Release date: 2002-09-06

  • Table: 85-224-X20020006457
    Description:

    Over the past two decades, the negative consequences of child maltreatment have been extensively studied. Sexual and physical assault, emotional abuse and neglect can have a tremendous impact on the lives of victims and lead to physical health complications, long-term mental health issues, and problems with relationships or social functioning (Latimer 1998). Increasingly, exposure to spousal violence is being recognized as harmful and as putting children at risk for long-term negative effects.

    Release date: 2002-06-26

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002191
    Description:

    This study assesses how geographic distance between home and school affects the probability of attending university shortly after high school graduation. Students that grow up near a university can save on costs by staying home to attend the local university and thus may be more likely to attend. Using the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics, a database of Canadian university postal codes and a special postal code conversion file that calculates the geographic co-ordinates of postal codes, it was possible to estimate the straight-line distances between the homes of high school students prior to graduating and the nearest university. After controlling for family income, parental education and other factors associated with university participation, students living 'out-of-commuting distance' are far less likely to attend than are students living 'within commuting distance.' Distance also plays a role in the relationship between university participation and its other correlates, such as family income and sex.

    Release date: 2002-06-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020016197
    Description:

    This study identifies factors that influenced Ontario Grade 3 student achievement using a reference group to assess the impact of changes in student, class and school characteristics.

    Release date: 2002-06-11

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X20010046180
    Description:

    This article examines the childcare services industry in Canada and is divided into three basic parts. First it looks at demand for childcare services, including the .5 billion spent by households for these services. Examined next are financial characteristics of the industry and the roles played by the non-profit sector and government fee subsidy and grant programs. The final section looks at some characteristics of the childcare workforce.

    Release date: 2002-04-26

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20020038373
    Description:

    In 2000/01, 99,590 cases were processed in the youth courts of Canada. This represents a 2% decrease in the number of cases processed from the previous year and a decrease of 10% from 1996/97.

    The number of Property crime cases heard in youth courts decreased annually, dropping 23% between 1996/97 and 2000/01. The number of Violent crime cases has dropped by 6% since 1996/97. The number of Drug-related cases has increased by 30% since 1996/97.

    Release date: 2002-03-21

Data (3)

Data (3) (3 results)

  • Table: 89-579-X
    Description:

    The 2001 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS) is a post-censal survey of adults and children whose everyday activities are limited because of a condition or health problem. A sample of those persons who answered 'Yes' to the 2001 Census disability filter questions were included in the PALS survey population. Approximately 35,000 adults and 8,000 children living in private and some collective households in the 10 provinces were selected to participate in the survey. The data were collected after the 2001 Census, in the fall of 2001.

    These tables contain data on the number of adults and children with disabilities, disability rates, as well as the type and severity of disability, by age and sex, for Canada and the provinces.

    Release date: 2002-12-03

  • Table: 89-511-X
    Description:

    For youths, the ages 15 to 19 are a transition period. Most still live at home and a growing percentage are enrolled in academic institutions. At the same time, however, they are beginning to experience problems and characteristics usually associated with adult life. Many, for example, have begun to leave home; others are entering the labour market for the first time. Youths have the highest unemployment rate of any age group in the country. In addition, those who head families or live alone have very low incomes. These characteristics and others - demographic, family status, education, labour force characteristics, income, health, time-use patterns, criminal activity and victimization - are described in this report, which has drawn upon many sources.

    Release date: 2002-10-30

  • Table: 85-224-X20020006457
    Description:

    Over the past two decades, the negative consequences of child maltreatment have been extensively studied. Sexual and physical assault, emotional abuse and neglect can have a tremendous impact on the lives of victims and lead to physical health complications, long-term mental health issues, and problems with relationships or social functioning (Latimer 1998). Increasingly, exposure to spousal violence is being recognized as harmful and as putting children at risk for long-term negative effects.

    Release date: 2002-06-26

Analysis (12)

Analysis (12) (12 of 12 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020036394
    Description:

    This article explores the demographic, social and economic characteristics of the underweight population.

    Release date: 2002-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020036393
    Description:

    This article looks at how people feel about their neighbourhood.

    Release date: 2002-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002181
    Description:

    We use data from the Canadian National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth to address two questions. To what extent do parents and children agree when asked identical questions about child well-being? To what extent do differences in their responses affect what one infers from multivariate analysis of the data? The correspondence between parent and child in the assessment of child well-being is only slight to fair. Agreement is stronger for more observable outcomes, such as schooling performance, and weaker for less observable outcomes, such as emotional disorders. We regress both sets of responses on a standard set of socio-economic characteristics. We also conduct formal and informal tests of the differences in what one would infer from these two sets of regressions.

    Release date: 2002-10-23

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20020098428
    Description:

    The Juristat publication, "Pilot analysis of recidivism among convicted youth and young adults, 1999/00," summarizes trends from the provincial/territorial courts across Canada that provided data to the Adult Criminal Court Survey (ACCS) and the Youth Court Survey (YCS). This report attempts to gauge the prevalence of recidivism in young adults by examining the conviction histories of young adults convicted in Canadian criminal courts in 1999-2000. It also examines the transition from youth to adult offending, including patterns of re-offending, differences in conviction histories by age of onset and the impact of conviction history on court sentencing.

    Release date: 2002-10-23

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20020088416
    Description:

    This Juristat presents and analyzes information on young offender admissions to custody and community services, with breakdowns by custody (remand, secure, and open) and probation, and key case characteristics such as age, sex, Aboriginal/non-Aboriginal status, and most serious offence. In addition, it includes data pertaining to releases from remand, secure custody, and open custody by sex and time served. These breakdowns are presented and analyzed at the national and provincial/territorial level.

    Alternative measures refer to formalized programs across Canada through which persons who would otherwise proceed to court are dealt with via non-judicial sanctions. An analysis on alternative measures includes data pertaining to the participation and agreement by the youth to enter these community-based alternatives. The key case characteristics of this survey are similar to those collected by the Youth Custody and Community Services survey.

    The Youth Key Indicators describe average daily counts (caseload), which measure the volume of offenders held in custody or on probation on an average day. This information also provides an examination of youth incarceration and probation rates in Canada.

    Data summarized in this Juristat are primarily drawn from three perspectives: 1) The Youth Custody and Community Services (YCCS) survey. The scope of the survey is to collect and analyze information on the application of dispositions under the Young Offenders Act from provincial and territorial agencies responsible for youth corrections and programs. 2) The Alternative Measures survey, which collects and analyzes data on the number of agreements achieved and completed. And, 3) The Youth Key Indicator Report that measures the average counts of youth in custody (remand, secure and open) and on probation.

    Release date: 2002-10-09

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20020078417
    Description:

    This annual report is an examination of homicide in Canada. Detailed information is presented on the characteristics of homicide incidents (murder, manslaughter and infanticide), and, within the context of both short and long-term trends, the victims and accused. Geographical patterns of homicide are examined at the national and provincial/territorial levels, as well as for major metropolitan areas. Other key themes include international comparisons of homicide, gang-related homicides, firearm-related homicides, youth homicide and family (including spousal) homicides. The data are intended to respond to the needs of those who work in the criminal justice system, as well as to inform researchers, policy analysts, academics, the media and the public on the nature and extent of homicide in Canada.

    Release date: 2002-09-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020026349
    Description:

    This article examines suicide deaths and hospitalized suicide attempts among Canadians aged 10 years or older.

    Release date: 2002-09-17

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X2002040
    Description:

    The childcare services industry in Canada is unique in that it is entrusted with a precious resource: close to 1.4 million children. Childcare providers assist with the daunting tasks of promoting child development, ensuring children's safety and well-being, and maintaining responsive relationships with individual children.

    This paper examines the childcare services industry in Canada and is divided into three basic parts. First, the article studies the demand for childcare services, including the $3.5 billion spent by households for these services. The financial characteristics of the industry and the roles played by the non-profit sector and government fee-subsidy and grant programs are examined next. And the final section looks at some of the characteristics of the childcare workforce.

    Release date: 2002-09-06

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2002191
    Description:

    This study assesses how geographic distance between home and school affects the probability of attending university shortly after high school graduation. Students that grow up near a university can save on costs by staying home to attend the local university and thus may be more likely to attend. Using the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics, a database of Canadian university postal codes and a special postal code conversion file that calculates the geographic co-ordinates of postal codes, it was possible to estimate the straight-line distances between the homes of high school students prior to graduating and the nearest university. After controlling for family income, parental education and other factors associated with university participation, students living 'out-of-commuting distance' are far less likely to attend than are students living 'within commuting distance.' Distance also plays a role in the relationship between university participation and its other correlates, such as family income and sex.

    Release date: 2002-06-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020016197
    Description:

    This study identifies factors that influenced Ontario Grade 3 student achievement using a reference group to assess the impact of changes in student, class and school characteristics.

    Release date: 2002-06-11

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X20010046180
    Description:

    This article examines the childcare services industry in Canada and is divided into three basic parts. First it looks at demand for childcare services, including the .5 billion spent by households for these services. Examined next are financial characteristics of the industry and the roles played by the non-profit sector and government fee subsidy and grant programs. The final section looks at some characteristics of the childcare workforce.

    Release date: 2002-04-26

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20020038373
    Description:

    In 2000/01, 99,590 cases were processed in the youth courts of Canada. This represents a 2% decrease in the number of cases processed from the previous year and a decrease of 10% from 1996/97.

    The number of Property crime cases heard in youth courts decreased annually, dropping 23% between 1996/97 and 2000/01. The number of Violent crime cases has dropped by 6% since 1996/97. The number of Drug-related cases has increased by 30% since 1996/97.

    Release date: 2002-03-21

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