Statistics by subject – Children and youth

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All (24)

All (24) (24 of 24 results)

  • Table: 89-577-X
    Description:

    The 2001 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS) is a post-censal survey of adults and children whose everyday activities may be limited because of a condition or health problem. A sample of those persons who answered 'Yes' to the 2001 Census disability filter questions were included in the PALS Survey population. Approximately 35,000 adults and 8,000 children living in private and some collective households in the 10 provinces were selected to participate in the survey. The data was collected after the 2001 Census, in the fall of 2001.

    This paper presents initial results on the number of persons with disabilities, disability rates as well as the type and severity of disability, by age and sex, for Canada and the provinces.

    Release date: 2003-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S2003000
    Description:

    Growing up Healthy? is the fourth report in the Statistics Canada series, How Healthy Are Canadians? It contains articles that examine the conditions that impede, as well as those that enhance, children's potential to "grow up healthy."

    Factors related to adolescents' self-perceived health identifies issues other than illness that are linked to less favourable ratings of health. For example, the roles of obesity, smoking, physical inactivity and heavy drinking are examined.

    Parent and child factors associated with youth obesity investigates behaviours, circumstances and parental characteristics that relate to obesity in adolescents. Differences between boys and girls, which may reflect gender-specific social pressures and responses to such pressures, are also explored.

    Sedentary children who become activefocuses on conditions linked to children's becoming physically active. A variety of influences are considered, including time spent watching TV as well as hours of physical education classes offered at school.

    Adolescent self-concept and health into adulthood studies links between self-worth and sense of control in adolescence, and mental and physical health over the next several years. Health outcomes in young adulthood are analyzed in relation to positive and negative self-concept in adolescence, and differences between the sexes are highlighted.

    Witnessing violence - anxiety and aggression in young children focuses on children who were aged 4 to 7 in 1994, and examines levels of anxiety and aggression in the short- and longer-term in relation to their exposure to violence in the home.

    Release date: 2003-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030036702
    Description:

    Although generally considered a happy event, the birth of a baby brings with it significant stresses. The transition period of adjusting to the demands of a new lifestyle is often made smoother when parents are able to take some time off work and stay at home with their newborn. Over the years, the Canadian government has extended parental leave several times to allow mothers and fathers more time with their children. This article examines whether parents now remain at home longer with their infants, as well as the socio-demographic factors that influence the length of leave time taken.

    Release date: 2003-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030036704
    Description:

    This article examines the potential pool of healthcare practitioners who use French at work, as well as those who do not regularly use French in the workplace but who have knowledge of that language, and compares it with the French-speaking population.

    Release date: 2003-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S20030006692
    Description:

    The gender gap emerges as an important issue in this article, which studies links between self-worth and sense of control in adolescence, and mental and physical health over the next several years. Health outcomes in young adulthood are analyzed in relation to positive and negative self-concept in adolescence, and differences between the sexes are highlighted.

    Release date: 2003-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S20030006693
    Description:

    This article focuses on children who were aged 4 to 7 in 1994, and examines levels of anxiety and aggression in relation to their exposure to violence in the home. The evidence that emerges of the short- and longer-term effects on their behaviour and emotions is compelling.

    Release date: 2003-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S20030006681
    Description:

    This article focuses on conditions linked to children's becoming physically active. A variety of influences are considered, including time spent watching TV as well as hours of physical education classes offered at school.

    Release date: 2003-10-31

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-594-X
    Description:

    This paper uses three cycles of the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) to examine whether parental labour market participation and the use of substitute child-care influence the development of the skills needed by pre-school-aged children in order to begin school. The analysis in this paper is based on the arguments that parent-child interaction fosters the development of the skills needed by pre-school-aged children in order to begin school successfully, and that full-time participation in the work force by lone parents (in one-parent families) and by both parents (in dual-parent families) often results in comparatively less time for parent-child interaction than in families with a stay-at-home parent. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to determine whether reductions in parental time spent with children as a result of work outside the home impact the intellectual development of young children.

    The study indicates that parental participation in the labour market has little effect on the school readiness scores of most pre-school-aged children. However, children's school readiness does appear to be influenced by parental labour market participation if the parents exhibit above-average parenting skills and levels of parental education. Children of mothers who display above-average parenting skills and higher levels of education tend to benefit slightly when their mothers do not work outside the home. Likewise, children of fathers with above-average education exhibit slightly higher cognitive outcomes if their fathers work part time.

    Although the author finds that there is no association between the number of hours that children spend in child care and their level of school readiness, the study does observe that among pre-school children in substitute child-care, those who come from higher-income families tend to score higher on the school readiness tests than do children from lower-income families. This finding may be attributed to the possibility that children in higher-income families are exposed to a higher quality of substitute child-care, or it may be attributed simply to the advantages of growing up in a family with greater resources.

    Release date: 2003-10-23

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030026622
    Description:

    This study examines the time volunteers, friends or relatives devote to unpaid informal care.

    Release date: 2003-09-09

  • Table: 89-586-X
    Description:

    The 2001 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS) is a post-censal survey of adults and children whose everyday activities are limited because of a condition or health problem. A sample of those persons who answered " Yes" to the 2001 Census disability filter questions were included in the PALS survey population. Approximately 8,000 children (aged 0 to 14) living in households in the 10 provinces were selected to participate in the children's component of the survey. Persons living in institutions, on Indian reserves and in the Yukon, Northwest Territories or Nunavut were excluded. The data were collected after the 2001 Census, between September 2001 and January 2002. Note that information on children with disabilities was gathered through interviews with their parents or guardians.

    These tables contain PALS data on children aged 5 to 14 who have disabilities and the impact of their disability on the daily activities and employment situation of their families.Specific themes covered are:-help with everyday activities received by children with disabilities;-parents access to help; formal and informal-impacts of the child's disability on the family's employment situation;-children's access to specialized aids and services; and household income.

    Tables are presented by severity of disability of children with disabilities, for Canada and provinces.

    Release date: 2003-07-29

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-585-X
    Description:

    The 2001 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS) is a post-censal survey of adults and children whose everyday activities are limited because of a condition or health problem. A sample of those persons who answered "Yes" to the 2001 Census disability filter questions were included in the PALS survey population. Approximately 8,000 children (aged 0 to 14) living in households in the 10 provinces were selected to participate in the children's component of the survey. Persons living in institutions, on Indian reserves, and in the Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut were excluded. The data were collected after the 2001 Census, between September 2001 and January 2002. Note that information on children with disabilities was gathered through interviews with their parents or guardians.

    Using the PALS data, this article describes the lives of children aged 5 to 14 who have disabilities and the impact of their disability on the daily activities and employment situation of their families.

    Specific themes covered are:-help with everyday activities received by children with disabilities;-parents access to formal and informal help;-impacts of the child's disability on the family's employment situation;-children's access to specialized aids and services; and-household income.

    Release date: 2003-07-29

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20030048418
    Description:

    This report provides the most recent information from the 2001/02 Transition Home Survey. It surveys facilities providing residential services for abused women conducted every two years. Questionnaires are mailed to every known facility identified as providing residential services (shelter) to abused women in each province and territory. Information is collected on the characteristics of the facilities and the services provided during the previous 12 months. The survey also provides a one-day snapshot of the characteristics of women and children residing in shelters on a specific day. For the 2001/02 survey, the snapshot day was April 15, 2002. In 2001/02, some 92% of shelters responded to the survey. Where possible, comparisons are made with the 1997/98 and 1999/00 Transition Home surveys.

    Release date: 2003-06-23

  • Table: 85-224-X20030006543
    Description:

    This chapter focusses on physical and sexual assaults and homicides committed against children and youth (under the age of 18) and reported to police forces across the country. In addition, system responses to the problem of child maltreatment are examined.

    Release date: 2003-06-23

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20030038371
    Description:

    This series of reports provides detailed statistics and analysis on a variety of topics and issues concerning Canada's justice system. The annual Juristat, Youth Court Statistics summarizes trends from provincial and territorial youth courts across Canada, which provide data to the Youth Court Survey (YCS). In the 2001/02 Juristat, information is presented on the characteristics of cases and accused youth, conviction rates, sentencing trends and related issues. As well, statistics are presented for a 10-year period (1992/93 through 2001/02).

    Release date: 2003-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2003002
    Description:

    This research paper explores the effect of witnessing violence in the home on aggressive behaviour among children, controlling for other important influences such as parenting practices, community and social support available to the parent and child, child emotional problems, and other socio-demographic factors.

    Release date: 2003-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20020026526
    Description:

    This study examines the labour market outcomes of university and college graduates who entered the work force at three points of the economic cycle: 1986, 1990 and 1995. It uses data from the National Graduates Survey.

    Release date: 2003-06-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030016528
    Description:

    This article looks at the socio-demographic characteristics (marital status, religion, country of birth, education and income) of Canadians aged 20 to 34 who intend to stay childfree.

    Release date: 2003-06-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030016530
    Description:

    This study looks at Canadian 15-year-old students' use of information and communication technologies at home and at school.

    Release date: 2003-06-10

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2003201
    Description:

    Previous research suggests that high-school students living beyond commuting distance from a university are far less likely to attend, especially if they are from a lower-income family. This study asks three follow-up questions. First, do students who live too far to attend university 'make-up' for this disadvantage by attending college (if one is nearby)? Second, how does this uptake in college participation differ by class of income? And finally, does distance to school deter students from attending college?

    After controlling for various factors associated with postsecondary participation, including sex, province, family income, and parental education, students living near a college are more likely to attend college than those students living near both a university and a college. The magnitude of this uptake in college participation almost completely counterbalances the difference in university participation, yielding similar postsecondary participation rates between the two groups. It was found that the uptake in college participation in outlying areas mainly occurs within groups of students who are from lower- and middle-income families, and who live far away from universities. Although there are very few students living beyond commuting distance from a college, research has shown that these students are far less likely to attend college, especially if they are from a lower-income family.

    Release date: 2003-06-04

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2003004
    Description:

    This study investigates the link between having a job in high school and quitting school. It uses data from the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS).

    Release date: 2003-05-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020046499
    Description:

    This article examines what happens to the time use of young people when they add a job to their daily schedule.

    Release date: 2003-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2003003
    Description:

    This report provides a description of the labour-market outcomes experienced by 1995 postsecondary graduates, by gender and by field of specialization.

    Release date: 2003-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20020016464
    Description:

    This article uses data from the 2000 Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) to examine differences in reading performance between students in rural and urban schools in each province.

    Release date: 2003-02-17

Data (4)

Data (4) (4 of 4 results)

  • Table: 89-577-X
    Description:

    The 2001 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS) is a post-censal survey of adults and children whose everyday activities may be limited because of a condition or health problem. A sample of those persons who answered 'Yes' to the 2001 Census disability filter questions were included in the PALS Survey population. Approximately 35,000 adults and 8,000 children living in private and some collective households in the 10 provinces were selected to participate in the survey. The data was collected after the 2001 Census, in the fall of 2001.

    This paper presents initial results on the number of persons with disabilities, disability rates as well as the type and severity of disability, by age and sex, for Canada and the provinces.

    Release date: 2003-12-19

  • Table: 89-586-X
    Description:

    The 2001 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS) is a post-censal survey of adults and children whose everyday activities are limited because of a condition or health problem. A sample of those persons who answered " Yes" to the 2001 Census disability filter questions were included in the PALS survey population. Approximately 8,000 children (aged 0 to 14) living in households in the 10 provinces were selected to participate in the children's component of the survey. Persons living in institutions, on Indian reserves and in the Yukon, Northwest Territories or Nunavut were excluded. The data were collected after the 2001 Census, between September 2001 and January 2002. Note that information on children with disabilities was gathered through interviews with their parents or guardians.

    These tables contain PALS data on children aged 5 to 14 who have disabilities and the impact of their disability on the daily activities and employment situation of their families.Specific themes covered are:-help with everyday activities received by children with disabilities;-parents access to help; formal and informal-impacts of the child's disability on the family's employment situation;-children's access to specialized aids and services; and household income.

    Tables are presented by severity of disability of children with disabilities, for Canada and provinces.

    Release date: 2003-07-29

  • Table: 85-224-X20030006543
    Description:

    This chapter focusses on physical and sexual assaults and homicides committed against children and youth (under the age of 18) and reported to police forces across the country. In addition, system responses to the problem of child maltreatment are examined.

    Release date: 2003-06-23

Analysis (20)

Analysis (20) (20 of 20 results)

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S2003000
    Description:

    Growing up Healthy? is the fourth report in the Statistics Canada series, How Healthy Are Canadians? It contains articles that examine the conditions that impede, as well as those that enhance, children's potential to "grow up healthy."

    Factors related to adolescents' self-perceived health identifies issues other than illness that are linked to less favourable ratings of health. For example, the roles of obesity, smoking, physical inactivity and heavy drinking are examined.

    Parent and child factors associated with youth obesity investigates behaviours, circumstances and parental characteristics that relate to obesity in adolescents. Differences between boys and girls, which may reflect gender-specific social pressures and responses to such pressures, are also explored.

    Sedentary children who become activefocuses on conditions linked to children's becoming physically active. A variety of influences are considered, including time spent watching TV as well as hours of physical education classes offered at school.

    Adolescent self-concept and health into adulthood studies links between self-worth and sense of control in adolescence, and mental and physical health over the next several years. Health outcomes in young adulthood are analyzed in relation to positive and negative self-concept in adolescence, and differences between the sexes are highlighted.

    Witnessing violence - anxiety and aggression in young children focuses on children who were aged 4 to 7 in 1994, and examines levels of anxiety and aggression in the short- and longer-term in relation to their exposure to violence in the home.

    Release date: 2003-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030036702
    Description:

    Although generally considered a happy event, the birth of a baby brings with it significant stresses. The transition period of adjusting to the demands of a new lifestyle is often made smoother when parents are able to take some time off work and stay at home with their newborn. Over the years, the Canadian government has extended parental leave several times to allow mothers and fathers more time with their children. This article examines whether parents now remain at home longer with their infants, as well as the socio-demographic factors that influence the length of leave time taken.

    Release date: 2003-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030036704
    Description:

    This article examines the potential pool of healthcare practitioners who use French at work, as well as those who do not regularly use French in the workplace but who have knowledge of that language, and compares it with the French-speaking population.

    Release date: 2003-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S20030006692
    Description:

    The gender gap emerges as an important issue in this article, which studies links between self-worth and sense of control in adolescence, and mental and physical health over the next several years. Health outcomes in young adulthood are analyzed in relation to positive and negative self-concept in adolescence, and differences between the sexes are highlighted.

    Release date: 2003-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S20030006693
    Description:

    This article focuses on children who were aged 4 to 7 in 1994, and examines levels of anxiety and aggression in relation to their exposure to violence in the home. The evidence that emerges of the short- and longer-term effects on their behaviour and emotions is compelling.

    Release date: 2003-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-S20030006681
    Description:

    This article focuses on conditions linked to children's becoming physically active. A variety of influences are considered, including time spent watching TV as well as hours of physical education classes offered at school.

    Release date: 2003-10-31

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-594-X
    Description:

    This paper uses three cycles of the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) to examine whether parental labour market participation and the use of substitute child-care influence the development of the skills needed by pre-school-aged children in order to begin school. The analysis in this paper is based on the arguments that parent-child interaction fosters the development of the skills needed by pre-school-aged children in order to begin school successfully, and that full-time participation in the work force by lone parents (in one-parent families) and by both parents (in dual-parent families) often results in comparatively less time for parent-child interaction than in families with a stay-at-home parent. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to determine whether reductions in parental time spent with children as a result of work outside the home impact the intellectual development of young children.

    The study indicates that parental participation in the labour market has little effect on the school readiness scores of most pre-school-aged children. However, children's school readiness does appear to be influenced by parental labour market participation if the parents exhibit above-average parenting skills and levels of parental education. Children of mothers who display above-average parenting skills and higher levels of education tend to benefit slightly when their mothers do not work outside the home. Likewise, children of fathers with above-average education exhibit slightly higher cognitive outcomes if their fathers work part time.

    Although the author finds that there is no association between the number of hours that children spend in child care and their level of school readiness, the study does observe that among pre-school children in substitute child-care, those who come from higher-income families tend to score higher on the school readiness tests than do children from lower-income families. This finding may be attributed to the possibility that children in higher-income families are exposed to a higher quality of substitute child-care, or it may be attributed simply to the advantages of growing up in a family with greater resources.

    Release date: 2003-10-23

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030026622
    Description:

    This study examines the time volunteers, friends or relatives devote to unpaid informal care.

    Release date: 2003-09-09

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-585-X
    Description:

    The 2001 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS) is a post-censal survey of adults and children whose everyday activities are limited because of a condition or health problem. A sample of those persons who answered "Yes" to the 2001 Census disability filter questions were included in the PALS survey population. Approximately 8,000 children (aged 0 to 14) living in households in the 10 provinces were selected to participate in the children's component of the survey. Persons living in institutions, on Indian reserves, and in the Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut were excluded. The data were collected after the 2001 Census, between September 2001 and January 2002. Note that information on children with disabilities was gathered through interviews with their parents or guardians.

    Using the PALS data, this article describes the lives of children aged 5 to 14 who have disabilities and the impact of their disability on the daily activities and employment situation of their families.

    Specific themes covered are:-help with everyday activities received by children with disabilities;-parents access to formal and informal help;-impacts of the child's disability on the family's employment situation;-children's access to specialized aids and services; and-household income.

    Release date: 2003-07-29

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20030048418
    Description:

    This report provides the most recent information from the 2001/02 Transition Home Survey. It surveys facilities providing residential services for abused women conducted every two years. Questionnaires are mailed to every known facility identified as providing residential services (shelter) to abused women in each province and territory. Information is collected on the characteristics of the facilities and the services provided during the previous 12 months. The survey also provides a one-day snapshot of the characteristics of women and children residing in shelters on a specific day. For the 2001/02 survey, the snapshot day was April 15, 2002. In 2001/02, some 92% of shelters responded to the survey. Where possible, comparisons are made with the 1997/98 and 1999/00 Transition Home surveys.

    Release date: 2003-06-23

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20030038371
    Description:

    This series of reports provides detailed statistics and analysis on a variety of topics and issues concerning Canada's justice system. The annual Juristat, Youth Court Statistics summarizes trends from provincial and territorial youth courts across Canada, which provide data to the Youth Court Survey (YCS). In the 2001/02 Juristat, information is presented on the characteristics of cases and accused youth, conviction rates, sentencing trends and related issues. As well, statistics are presented for a 10-year period (1992/93 through 2001/02).

    Release date: 2003-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2003002
    Description:

    This research paper explores the effect of witnessing violence in the home on aggressive behaviour among children, controlling for other important influences such as parenting practices, community and social support available to the parent and child, child emotional problems, and other socio-demographic factors.

    Release date: 2003-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20020026526
    Description:

    This study examines the labour market outcomes of university and college graduates who entered the work force at three points of the economic cycle: 1986, 1990 and 1995. It uses data from the National Graduates Survey.

    Release date: 2003-06-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030016528
    Description:

    This article looks at the socio-demographic characteristics (marital status, religion, country of birth, education and income) of Canadians aged 20 to 34 who intend to stay childfree.

    Release date: 2003-06-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20030016530
    Description:

    This study looks at Canadian 15-year-old students' use of information and communication technologies at home and at school.

    Release date: 2003-06-10

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2003201
    Description:

    Previous research suggests that high-school students living beyond commuting distance from a university are far less likely to attend, especially if they are from a lower-income family. This study asks three follow-up questions. First, do students who live too far to attend university 'make-up' for this disadvantage by attending college (if one is nearby)? Second, how does this uptake in college participation differ by class of income? And finally, does distance to school deter students from attending college?

    After controlling for various factors associated with postsecondary participation, including sex, province, family income, and parental education, students living near a college are more likely to attend college than those students living near both a university and a college. The magnitude of this uptake in college participation almost completely counterbalances the difference in university participation, yielding similar postsecondary participation rates between the two groups. It was found that the uptake in college participation in outlying areas mainly occurs within groups of students who are from lower- and middle-income families, and who live far away from universities. Although there are very few students living beyond commuting distance from a college, research has shown that these students are far less likely to attend college, especially if they are from a lower-income family.

    Release date: 2003-06-04

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2003004
    Description:

    This study investigates the link between having a job in high school and quitting school. It uses data from the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS).

    Release date: 2003-05-26

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20020046499
    Description:

    This article examines what happens to the time use of young people when they add a job to their daily schedule.

    Release date: 2003-03-18

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2003003
    Description:

    This report provides a description of the labour-market outcomes experienced by 1995 postsecondary graduates, by gender and by field of specialization.

    Release date: 2003-02-24

  • Articles and reports: 81-003-X20020016464
    Description:

    This article uses data from the 2000 Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) to examine differences in reading performance between students in rural and urban schools in each province.

    Release date: 2003-02-17

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