Statistics by subject – Children and youth

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All (17)

All (17) (17 of 17 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20060029274
    Description:

    This article uses data from the 2001 General Social Survey to examine patterns in leaving the parental home. It compares the transition process for five birth cohorts,with the focus on Wave 1 Boomers (born between 1947 and 1956) and their children in Generation X (born between 1967 and 1976). The differences in patterns of leaving the parental home are examined, and then the principal factors associated with a young person's initial launch into adulthood are identified.

    Release date: 2006-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20060029275
    Description:

    This article examines involvement with the court system of young Canadians born between April 1979 and March 1980. It identifies how large a proportion of them were referred to court and the type of offence with which they were charged. Using data from the Youth Court Survey and the Adult Criminal Court Survey, it follows them as they moved from youth to young adulthood - that is, from age 12 to 21, inclusive

    Release date: 2006-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 89-599-M2006004
    Description:

    This report provides an overview of Canadian children as they enter school as 5-year-olds. It looks at the collection of abilities, behaviours and attitudes that they bring with them, attributes that are important for early school achievement. The report shows that children vary on some dimensions of readiness to learn at school, according to their family characteristics, their background and their home environment and experiences. It also shows that some of the differences in readiness to learn may already be evident two years earlier, when the children were 3 years old. Finally, the report indicates factors in the home environment that may contribute to differences among different economic groups. The report adds to what we know about readiness to learn. It provides information that may be useful for policy analysts, teachers, researchers, and parents themselves as they work toward maximizing the potential of preschool children everywhere.

    Release date: 2006-11-27

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610713167
    Description:

    The division of labour between men and women continues to evolve. Today's couples have a much more equal partnership in sharing financial, child care and household responsibilities. This has been brought about in large part by the expanding economic role of women, which has helped erode the idea that men should be primarily responsible for paid work while women look after unpaid household and family duties.

    Release date: 2006-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20050039277
    Description:

    More than a quarter - 26% - of 2- to 17-year-olds were overweight or obese in 2004. Low consumption of vegetables and fruit was associated with excess weight among this age group. As screen time (watching TV, playing video games, using a computer) increased, so did the likelihood that young people would be overweight/obese.

    Release date: 2006-08-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20060089290
    Description:

    As women have entered the labour force in greater numbers, gender differences in the division of labour within families have diminished, with men assuming more housework and child care. Changing work arrangements at home are also leading employers to adapt alternative work arrangements.

    Release date: 2006-08-10

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20060049251
    Description:

    The annual report on crime statistics presents an analysis of the police-reported data in 2005. These data are presented within the context of both short and long term trends. Data are examined at the national, provincial and territorial levels, as well as for major metropolitan areas by type of crime. The report distinguishes between violent crime, property crime, other Criminal Code offences, impaired driving, drug offences and youth crime.

    Release date: 2006-07-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20060019197
    Description:

    This paper uses Canadian data from the 2002 and 2003 National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth to examine the levels of altruism or prosocial behaviour, anxiety or emotional disorder, and physical aggression or conduct disorder for children aged 8 to 11 with and without learning disabilities, controlling for characteristics of the child, the family and parenting style. Children were identified as having learning disabilities if they were diagnosed as having this long-term condition by a health professional.

    Release date: 2006-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006284
    Description:

    The present review provides a description of various Canadian national survey data sets that could be used to examine issues related to child care use. National data sets dealing with patterns of employment, time use, family earnings, social support, and child, adolescent, or adult health measures were included. We conclude that numerous questions remain unanswered in terms of addressing the relationship between patterns of employment, use of child care, family roles and responsibilities, and associations with the health of families. Recommendations are made about information that has not been collected but may prove to be useful in addressing these issues. Moreover, we conclude that existing Canadian national survey data could be used to address several issues related to patterns of care use as well as the impact on children and families.

    Release date: 2006-06-19

  • Technical products: 82-621-X20060029226
    Description:

    This article examines smoking trends from 2000/01 to 2005 for the population aged 12 or older, using data from the Canadian Community Health Survey. Smoking prevalence is compared by age, sex and province. Proportions of the population living in households where smoking is totally banned are presented, as well as percentages of the employed population who face smoking bans at work. Exposure rates to second-hand smoke among non-smokers are examined. The article also presents estimates of these characteristics at the health region level.

    Release date: 2006-06-13

  • Public use microdata: 89M0021X
    Description:

    The Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS) provides data on the social and economic conditions of Aboriginal people in Canada. Its specific purpose was to identify the needs of Aboriginal people focusing on issues such as health, schooling and language. The survey was designed and implemented in partnership with national Aboriginal organizations.

    This product contains information for the Aboriginal child and youth population (under 15 years) living in off-reserve areas.

    Release date: 2006-05-25

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006281
    Description:

    This research paper examines whether various measures of family income are associated with the cognitive, social/emotional, physical and behavioural development of children. Data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth were used to assess a range of measures of well-being among children aged 4-15 in 1998, whose family composition remained unchanged between 1994 and 1998. The study finds that regardless of age or how income is measured, higher family income is almost always associated with better child well-being. Among children in lower income families, incremental increases in household income are found to be associated with better child development outcomes. Increases in income continue to remain associated with better well-being, even once children are out of low income. In fact, the study does not find a point above which high income ceases to benefit children's development. In particular, children's cognitive and behavioural development measures appear to have the strongest associations with levels of family income.

    The results show that changes in family income appear to be less important for child outcomes than levels of family income for 8-11- and 12-15-year-olds. However, for the 4-7-year-old group, changes in family income are more important ' particularly for emotional development scores. Analysis from the Youth in Transition Survey also finds similar relationships between the socio-economic status of the family and the developmental outcomes of children.

    Release date: 2006-05-11

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20060019184
    Description:

    This article uses data from the Labour Force Survey to examine trends in the labour market experiences of young men and women who are full-time students: younger students aged 15 to 17 years (of normal high school age) and older students aged 18 to 24 years old (a typical age for attending postsecondary institutions). The analysis also distinguishes between employment during the school year (September to April) and employment during the summer months.

    Release date: 2006-04-27

  • Articles and reports: 89-599-M2006003
    Description:

    This study uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) to profile child care in Canada by focussing on the child care experiences of children aged 6 months to 5 years. The report covers the eight-year period from 1994/95 to 2002/03. Many aspects of child care are discussed including types of care arrangements, hours spent in care, characteristics of and changes in care arrangements, and the use of multiple arrangements. These aspects are compared over time, as are the child care experiences of children from various backgrounds. In addition, patterns in types of care arrangements as children age are discussed.

    Release date: 2006-04-05

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050049124
    Description:

    Who are the parents whose adult children still live at home? Are they less likely to have higher incomes and more likely to be immigrants? And how do these parents view their coresidence experience? This study uses data from the 2001 General Social Survey to compare parents whose adult children are still at home with those whose adult children do not live with them anymore. It then examines whether or not coresidence is associated with significant negative outcomes, particularly in terms of conflicts within couples. It also contrasts parents whose adult children never left the house and those whose children returned to the nest after living independently for a time.

    Release date: 2006-03-21

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20060018985
    Description:

    This Juristat presents for the first time a detailed examination of the offences against the administration of justice such as failure to comply with a court order, breach of probation, and failure to appear. It reports on the increasing occurence of these offences in the criminal justice system from 1994/95 to 2003/04.

    Release date: 2006-01-11

Data (2)

Data (2) (2 results)

Analysis (14)

Analysis (14) (14 of 14 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20060029274
    Description:

    This article uses data from the 2001 General Social Survey to examine patterns in leaving the parental home. It compares the transition process for five birth cohorts,with the focus on Wave 1 Boomers (born between 1947 and 1956) and their children in Generation X (born between 1967 and 1976). The differences in patterns of leaving the parental home are examined, and then the principal factors associated with a young person's initial launch into adulthood are identified.

    Release date: 2006-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20060029275
    Description:

    This article examines involvement with the court system of young Canadians born between April 1979 and March 1980. It identifies how large a proportion of them were referred to court and the type of offence with which they were charged. Using data from the Youth Court Survey and the Adult Criminal Court Survey, it follows them as they moved from youth to young adulthood - that is, from age 12 to 21, inclusive

    Release date: 2006-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 89-599-M2006004
    Description:

    This report provides an overview of Canadian children as they enter school as 5-year-olds. It looks at the collection of abilities, behaviours and attitudes that they bring with them, attributes that are important for early school achievement. The report shows that children vary on some dimensions of readiness to learn at school, according to their family characteristics, their background and their home environment and experiences. It also shows that some of the differences in readiness to learn may already be evident two years earlier, when the children were 3 years old. Finally, the report indicates factors in the home environment that may contribute to differences among different economic groups. The report adds to what we know about readiness to learn. It provides information that may be useful for policy analysts, teachers, researchers, and parents themselves as they work toward maximizing the potential of preschool children everywhere.

    Release date: 2006-11-27

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200610713167
    Description:

    The division of labour between men and women continues to evolve. Today's couples have a much more equal partnership in sharing financial, child care and household responsibilities. This has been brought about in large part by the expanding economic role of women, which has helped erode the idea that men should be primarily responsible for paid work while women look after unpaid household and family duties.

    Release date: 2006-09-19

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20050039277
    Description:

    More than a quarter - 26% - of 2- to 17-year-olds were overweight or obese in 2004. Low consumption of vegetables and fruit was associated with excess weight among this age group. As screen time (watching TV, playing video games, using a computer) increased, so did the likelihood that young people would be overweight/obese.

    Release date: 2006-08-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20060089290
    Description:

    As women have entered the labour force in greater numbers, gender differences in the division of labour within families have diminished, with men assuming more housework and child care. Changing work arrangements at home are also leading employers to adapt alternative work arrangements.

    Release date: 2006-08-10

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20060049251
    Description:

    The annual report on crime statistics presents an analysis of the police-reported data in 2005. These data are presented within the context of both short and long term trends. Data are examined at the national, provincial and territorial levels, as well as for major metropolitan areas by type of crime. The report distinguishes between violent crime, property crime, other Criminal Code offences, impaired driving, drug offences and youth crime.

    Release date: 2006-07-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20060019197
    Description:

    This paper uses Canadian data from the 2002 and 2003 National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth to examine the levels of altruism or prosocial behaviour, anxiety or emotional disorder, and physical aggression or conduct disorder for children aged 8 to 11 with and without learning disabilities, controlling for characteristics of the child, the family and parenting style. Children were identified as having learning disabilities if they were diagnosed as having this long-term condition by a health professional.

    Release date: 2006-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006284
    Description:

    The present review provides a description of various Canadian national survey data sets that could be used to examine issues related to child care use. National data sets dealing with patterns of employment, time use, family earnings, social support, and child, adolescent, or adult health measures were included. We conclude that numerous questions remain unanswered in terms of addressing the relationship between patterns of employment, use of child care, family roles and responsibilities, and associations with the health of families. Recommendations are made about information that has not been collected but may prove to be useful in addressing these issues. Moreover, we conclude that existing Canadian national survey data could be used to address several issues related to patterns of care use as well as the impact on children and families.

    Release date: 2006-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2006281
    Description:

    This research paper examines whether various measures of family income are associated with the cognitive, social/emotional, physical and behavioural development of children. Data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth were used to assess a range of measures of well-being among children aged 4-15 in 1998, whose family composition remained unchanged between 1994 and 1998. The study finds that regardless of age or how income is measured, higher family income is almost always associated with better child well-being. Among children in lower income families, incremental increases in household income are found to be associated with better child development outcomes. Increases in income continue to remain associated with better well-being, even once children are out of low income. In fact, the study does not find a point above which high income ceases to benefit children's development. In particular, children's cognitive and behavioural development measures appear to have the strongest associations with levels of family income.

    The results show that changes in family income appear to be less important for child outcomes than levels of family income for 8-11- and 12-15-year-olds. However, for the 4-7-year-old group, changes in family income are more important ' particularly for emotional development scores. Analysis from the Youth in Transition Survey also finds similar relationships between the socio-economic status of the family and the developmental outcomes of children.

    Release date: 2006-05-11

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20060019184
    Description:

    This article uses data from the Labour Force Survey to examine trends in the labour market experiences of young men and women who are full-time students: younger students aged 15 to 17 years (of normal high school age) and older students aged 18 to 24 years old (a typical age for attending postsecondary institutions). The analysis also distinguishes between employment during the school year (September to April) and employment during the summer months.

    Release date: 2006-04-27

  • Articles and reports: 89-599-M2006003
    Description:

    This study uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) to profile child care in Canada by focussing on the child care experiences of children aged 6 months to 5 years. The report covers the eight-year period from 1994/95 to 2002/03. Many aspects of child care are discussed including types of care arrangements, hours spent in care, characteristics of and changes in care arrangements, and the use of multiple arrangements. These aspects are compared over time, as are the child care experiences of children from various backgrounds. In addition, patterns in types of care arrangements as children age are discussed.

    Release date: 2006-04-05

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20050049124
    Description:

    Who are the parents whose adult children still live at home? Are they less likely to have higher incomes and more likely to be immigrants? And how do these parents view their coresidence experience? This study uses data from the 2001 General Social Survey to compare parents whose adult children are still at home with those whose adult children do not live with them anymore. It then examines whether or not coresidence is associated with significant negative outcomes, particularly in terms of conflicts within couples. It also contrasts parents whose adult children never left the house and those whose children returned to the nest after living independently for a time.

    Release date: 2006-03-21

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20060018985
    Description:

    This Juristat presents for the first time a detailed examination of the offences against the administration of justice such as failure to comply with a court order, breach of probation, and failure to appear. It reports on the increasing occurence of these offences in the criminal justice system from 1994/95 to 2003/04.

    Release date: 2006-01-11

Reference (1)

Reference (1) (1 result)

  • Technical products: 82-621-X20060029226
    Description:

    This article examines smoking trends from 2000/01 to 2005 for the population aged 12 or older, using data from the Canadian Community Health Survey. Smoking prevalence is compared by age, sex and province. Proportions of the population living in households where smoking is totally banned are presented, as well as percentages of the employed population who face smoking bans at work. Exposure rates to second-hand smoke among non-smokers are examined. The article also presents estimates of these characteristics at the health region level.

    Release date: 2006-06-13

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