Statistics by subject – Children and youth

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All (51) (25 of 51 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200700510314
    Description:

    Home ownership is very important to the vast majority of Canadians. Young adults are no different from the general population in this respect. To what extent do young adults succeed in making this desire a reality? What are the characteristics of those young people who own their home, and what are the obstacles to home ownership? Using data from the 2006 General Social Survey on family transitions, this article answers these questions by identifying the different factors associated with home ownership among young people aged 25 to 39 who no longer live with their parents.

    Release date: 2007-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2007054
    Description:

    This study 'maps' the various pathways that young people have taken from high school through to regular participation in the labour market. It links this transition to important background characteristics, in addition to highlighting the pathways that lead to successful transitions to employment.

    The study uses data from the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) for 2004. YITS is a longitudinal survey that first collected data from two age groups of youth in the first cycle of the survey in 2000. One group began its participation at age 15 (Cohort A) and the other at ages 18 to 20 (Cohort B); the focus of the analysis is on the second group. Both cohorts were asked to provide a range of information on their education and employment experiences as well as information on their personal characteristics including, for example, their educational aspirations.

    The first follow-up interview with the YITS participants took place in early 2002 when youth were interviewed for a second time. At that time, Cohort B participants were between the ages of 20 to 22. The second follow-up interview took place in 2004, for the reference period December 2003, when Cohort B participants were ages 22 to 24.

    This report builds on the basic pathway descriptions of non-students in December 2003 by first determining the major factors that help predict who follows which path. Following this, we turn our attention to studying how these pathways relate to 'success' in the labour market. Specifically, the report is organized as follows:

    Chapter 2 analyzes how background factors predict which school-to-labour market path young adults aged 22 to 24 passed through by December 2003; these background factors are for the most part static categories that do not change (for example, sex, age, ethnicity, parental education, etc.).

    Chapter 3 introduces various 'intervening' factors measured during high school (for example, grade-point average, working in high school, etc.). These factors are thought to be important for possibly mediating the effect of the prior background measures on predicting the school-to-work transitions.

    Chapter 4 shifts the focus of the analysis from looking at predictors of the school-to-work pathways to using the pathways as an indicator of labour market outcomes. In this chapter, we are able to determine whether certain paths are more or less successful for employment, as well as landing respondents 'good' jobs, defined in terms of earnings and level of job satisfaction. We are also able to determine in which occupation they worked during December 2003.

    Chapter 5, the concluding chapter, synthesizes the findings and analysis.

    Release date: 2007-11-01

  • Journals and periodicals: 82-620-M
    Description:

    This publication presents a series of research articles based on cross-sectional data collected from Cycle 2.2 of the Canadian Community Health Survey, focusing on Nutrition. It also provides links to tables, other research articles and information about the survey.

    Release date: 2007-10-05

  • Articles and reports: 89-627-X2007001
    Description:

    This fact sheet focuses on harvesting activities and the importance of country food among Inuit in the north of Canada. Data for each of the four Inuit Land Claim Settlement regions are provided. The fact sheet is one in a series based on data from the 2001 Aboriginal Peoples Survey. This fact sheet is associated with an article that was previously released entitled: Harvesting and Community Well-being Among Inuit in the Canadian Arctic: Preliminary Findings from the 2001 Aboriginal Peoples Survey - Survey of Living Conditions in the Arctic. This article is available at : http://www.statcan.gc.ca/bsolc/english/bsolc?catno=89-619-X

    Release date: 2007-09-28

  • Articles and reports: 89-627-X2007002
    Description:

    This fact sheet uses the Children and Youth component of the 2001 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS) to provide information on the health of Inuit children (aged less than 15). Specific themes covered include: breastfeeding, health status, chronic conditions, dental care, eating breakfast, and access to health care. Results are presented for all Inuit and specifically for those in the four Inuit land claim settlement regions in the Arctic: Nunatsiavut in northern Labrador, the territory of Nunavut, Nunavik in northern Quebec, and the Inuvialuit Settlement Region in the Northwest Territories. Where possible, results for Inuit children are compared to those of North American Indian, Métis and all Canadian children.

    Release date: 2007-09-28

  • Articles and reports: 89-627-X2007003
    Description:

    This report uses the Children and Youth component of the 2001 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS) to provide information on the health of Inuit children (aged less than 15). Specific themes covered include: breastfeeding, health status, chronic conditions, dental care, eating breakfast, and access to health care. Results are presented for all Inuit and specifically for those in the four Inuit land claim settlement regions in the Arctic: Nunatsiavut in northern Labrador, the territory of Nunavut, Nunavik in northern Quebec, and the Inuvialuit Settlement Region in the Northwest Territories. Where possible, results for Inuit children are compared to those of North American Indian, Métis and all Canadian children.

    Release date: 2007-09-28

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 89M0024X
    Description:

    The International Youth Survey (IYS) is the Canadian portion of the International Self-Report Delinquency Study (ISRD) which examines the behaviour and misbehaviour of students in grades 7 to 9 in about 30 European countries, United States and Canada. The National Crime Prevention Centre of the federal department of Public Safety sponsored the Canadian survey. The city of Toronto was chosen as the most suitable city where Statistics Canada could conduct the survey and on which the analysis of results would focus.

    The survey needed to be representative of each of the three grades (7 to 9) and at the grade level, of both sexes. In April 2006, about 3,200 students in 176 schools completed the IYS.

    Release date: 2007-09-25

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200700310318
    Description:

    Tens of thousands of students, from kindergarten to college and university, have gone back to school. In honour of this annual ritual, we have put together a few facts and figures relating to education, from the important role that parents play in preparing their children for school, to enrolment trends in college, university and apprenticeship training, to labour market outcomes across the country for individuals with differing levels of educational attainment.

    Release date: 2007-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200710513186
    Description:

    Early training and skills development can open up opportunities and choices. Apart from schooling, teenagers can also begin to build up their human capital by working at a paid job, participating in volunteer activities, and even doing household chores. But an inordinate amount of time spent on unpaid and paid work activities could lead to unhealthy levels of stress and reduction in well-being, and negatively affect education outcomes. This article examines trends in the number of hours teenagers spend daily on education-related activities, paid work and housework.

    Release date: 2007-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20070019628
    Description:

    Aboriginal people are confronted with the fact that many of their languages are disappearing. Over the past 100 years or more, at least 10 once-flourishing languages have become extinct. However, declining trends in the intergenerational transmission of Aboriginal mother tongues are being offset (to a degree) by the fact that Aboriginal languages are increasingly being learned as second language

    Release date: 2007-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20070069980
    Description:

    The labour force participation rate will inevitably decline over the next two decades. This reflects the retirement of the boomer generation and a low birth rate in recent years. Various scenarios involving increased immigration and keeping older workers in the labour force longer can mitigate but not reverse these trends

    Release date: 2007-06-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20070029571
    Description:

    The unemployment rate is a well-known barometer of labour-market health. The rise in the national unemployment rate in the years immediately following the high-tech meltdown has been replaced by sustained annual declines. Of course not all parts of the country have shared equally in the improvement. The article tracks the range of unemployment rates for local labour markets (the 28 census metropolitan areas [CMAs] and the 10 provincial non-CMA areas). It also looks at the relative durations of unemployment.

    Release date: 2007-03-20

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20070029601
    Description:

    This Juristat provides an overview of young persons under correctional services, in the second year since the introduction of the Youth Criminal Justice Act (YCJA), which came into effect on April 1, 2003. It uses data from the Youth Custody and Community Services Survey (YCCS) and the Integrated Correctional Services Survey (ICSS) to analyze trends within correctional services including, remand (pre-trial detention), sentenced custody, probation, deferred custody and supervision, and the community portion of a custody sentence. This Juristat examines youth correctional data which are drawn from two sources: 1) The Youth Key Indicator Report which measures the number of youth held in custody on an average day and on probation on an average month-end basis. An examination of trends provides an overview of caseload in youth corrections, as well as incarceration and probation rates, and 2) The YCCS survey and the ICSS collect data on youth admissions to and releases from custody and community services. These data are examined based on key case characteristics such as age, sex, Aboriginal/non-Aboriginal identity, most serious offence and length of time served. Data are analyzed at the provincial/territorial as well as national levels.

    Release date: 2007-03-14

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20060059588
    Description:

    Today, disability is viewed more often as a social construct than a medical one. Educational reforms have changed the way in which children with disabilities are integrated into the school system. With data from the 2001 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey, this article looks at the prevalence of children with disabilities, whether they attend regular classes and the kind of conditions for which they need special services. It examines the issues about access to educational services needed : which services are most needed and used, and what barriers may get in the way of obtaining such services.

    Release date: 2007-02-26

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2007295
    Description:

    In this study, I use new Canadian data containing detailed information on academic abilities, parental influences, financial constraints, and other socio-economic background characteristics of youth to try to account for the large gap in university attendance across the income distribution. I find that 96% of the total gap in university attendance between youth from the top and bottom income quartiles can be accounted for by differences in observable characteristics. Differences in long-term factors such as standardized test scores in reading obtained at age 15, school marks reported at age 15, parental influences, and high-school quality account for 84% of the gap. In contrast, only 12% of the gap is related to financial constraints. Similar results hold across different income quartiles and when I use standardized test scores in mathematics and science. However, reading scores account for a larger proportion of the gap than other test scores.

    Release date: 2007-02-08

Data (36)

Data (36) (25 of 36 results)

Analysis (14)

Analysis (14) (14 of 14 results)

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200700510314
    Description:

    Home ownership is very important to the vast majority of Canadians. Young adults are no different from the general population in this respect. To what extent do young adults succeed in making this desire a reality? What are the characteristics of those young people who own their home, and what are the obstacles to home ownership? Using data from the 2006 General Social Survey on family transitions, this article answers these questions by identifying the different factors associated with home ownership among young people aged 25 to 39 who no longer live with their parents.

    Release date: 2007-12-11

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2007054
    Description:

    This study 'maps' the various pathways that young people have taken from high school through to regular participation in the labour market. It links this transition to important background characteristics, in addition to highlighting the pathways that lead to successful transitions to employment.

    The study uses data from the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) for 2004. YITS is a longitudinal survey that first collected data from two age groups of youth in the first cycle of the survey in 2000. One group began its participation at age 15 (Cohort A) and the other at ages 18 to 20 (Cohort B); the focus of the analysis is on the second group. Both cohorts were asked to provide a range of information on their education and employment experiences as well as information on their personal characteristics including, for example, their educational aspirations.

    The first follow-up interview with the YITS participants took place in early 2002 when youth were interviewed for a second time. At that time, Cohort B participants were between the ages of 20 to 22. The second follow-up interview took place in 2004, for the reference period December 2003, when Cohort B participants were ages 22 to 24.

    This report builds on the basic pathway descriptions of non-students in December 2003 by first determining the major factors that help predict who follows which path. Following this, we turn our attention to studying how these pathways relate to 'success' in the labour market. Specifically, the report is organized as follows:

    Chapter 2 analyzes how background factors predict which school-to-labour market path young adults aged 22 to 24 passed through by December 2003; these background factors are for the most part static categories that do not change (for example, sex, age, ethnicity, parental education, etc.).

    Chapter 3 introduces various 'intervening' factors measured during high school (for example, grade-point average, working in high school, etc.). These factors are thought to be important for possibly mediating the effect of the prior background measures on predicting the school-to-work transitions.

    Chapter 4 shifts the focus of the analysis from looking at predictors of the school-to-work pathways to using the pathways as an indicator of labour market outcomes. In this chapter, we are able to determine whether certain paths are more or less successful for employment, as well as landing respondents 'good' jobs, defined in terms of earnings and level of job satisfaction. We are also able to determine in which occupation they worked during December 2003.

    Chapter 5, the concluding chapter, synthesizes the findings and analysis.

    Release date: 2007-11-01

  • Journals and periodicals: 82-620-M
    Description:

    This publication presents a series of research articles based on cross-sectional data collected from Cycle 2.2 of the Canadian Community Health Survey, focusing on Nutrition. It also provides links to tables, other research articles and information about the survey.

    Release date: 2007-10-05

  • Articles and reports: 89-627-X2007001
    Description:

    This fact sheet focuses on harvesting activities and the importance of country food among Inuit in the north of Canada. Data for each of the four Inuit Land Claim Settlement regions are provided. The fact sheet is one in a series based on data from the 2001 Aboriginal Peoples Survey. This fact sheet is associated with an article that was previously released entitled: Harvesting and Community Well-being Among Inuit in the Canadian Arctic: Preliminary Findings from the 2001 Aboriginal Peoples Survey - Survey of Living Conditions in the Arctic. This article is available at : http://www.statcan.gc.ca/bsolc/english/bsolc?catno=89-619-X

    Release date: 2007-09-28

  • Articles and reports: 89-627-X2007002
    Description:

    This fact sheet uses the Children and Youth component of the 2001 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS) to provide information on the health of Inuit children (aged less than 15). Specific themes covered include: breastfeeding, health status, chronic conditions, dental care, eating breakfast, and access to health care. Results are presented for all Inuit and specifically for those in the four Inuit land claim settlement regions in the Arctic: Nunatsiavut in northern Labrador, the territory of Nunavut, Nunavik in northern Quebec, and the Inuvialuit Settlement Region in the Northwest Territories. Where possible, results for Inuit children are compared to those of North American Indian, Métis and all Canadian children.

    Release date: 2007-09-28

  • Articles and reports: 89-627-X2007003
    Description:

    This report uses the Children and Youth component of the 2001 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS) to provide information on the health of Inuit children (aged less than 15). Specific themes covered include: breastfeeding, health status, chronic conditions, dental care, eating breakfast, and access to health care. Results are presented for all Inuit and specifically for those in the four Inuit land claim settlement regions in the Arctic: Nunatsiavut in northern Labrador, the territory of Nunavut, Nunavik in northern Quebec, and the Inuvialuit Settlement Region in the Northwest Territories. Where possible, results for Inuit children are compared to those of North American Indian, Métis and all Canadian children.

    Release date: 2007-09-28

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200700310318
    Description:

    Tens of thousands of students, from kindergarten to college and university, have gone back to school. In honour of this annual ritual, we have put together a few facts and figures relating to education, from the important role that parents play in preparing their children for school, to enrolment trends in college, university and apprenticeship training, to labour market outcomes across the country for individuals with differing levels of educational attainment.

    Release date: 2007-09-13

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X200710513186
    Description:

    Early training and skills development can open up opportunities and choices. Apart from schooling, teenagers can also begin to build up their human capital by working at a paid job, participating in volunteer activities, and even doing household chores. But an inordinate amount of time spent on unpaid and paid work activities could lead to unhealthy levels of stress and reduction in well-being, and negatively affect education outcomes. This article examines trends in the number of hours teenagers spend daily on education-related activities, paid work and housework.

    Release date: 2007-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20070019628
    Description:

    Aboriginal people are confronted with the fact that many of their languages are disappearing. Over the past 100 years or more, at least 10 once-flourishing languages have become extinct. However, declining trends in the intergenerational transmission of Aboriginal mother tongues are being offset (to a degree) by the fact that Aboriginal languages are increasingly being learned as second language

    Release date: 2007-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20070069980
    Description:

    The labour force participation rate will inevitably decline over the next two decades. This reflects the retirement of the boomer generation and a low birth rate in recent years. Various scenarios involving increased immigration and keeping older workers in the labour force longer can mitigate but not reverse these trends

    Release date: 2007-06-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20070029571
    Description:

    The unemployment rate is a well-known barometer of labour-market health. The rise in the national unemployment rate in the years immediately following the high-tech meltdown has been replaced by sustained annual declines. Of course not all parts of the country have shared equally in the improvement. The article tracks the range of unemployment rates for local labour markets (the 28 census metropolitan areas [CMAs] and the 10 provincial non-CMA areas). It also looks at the relative durations of unemployment.

    Release date: 2007-03-20

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20070029601
    Description:

    This Juristat provides an overview of young persons under correctional services, in the second year since the introduction of the Youth Criminal Justice Act (YCJA), which came into effect on April 1, 2003. It uses data from the Youth Custody and Community Services Survey (YCCS) and the Integrated Correctional Services Survey (ICSS) to analyze trends within correctional services including, remand (pre-trial detention), sentenced custody, probation, deferred custody and supervision, and the community portion of a custody sentence. This Juristat examines youth correctional data which are drawn from two sources: 1) The Youth Key Indicator Report which measures the number of youth held in custody on an average day and on probation on an average month-end basis. An examination of trends provides an overview of caseload in youth corrections, as well as incarceration and probation rates, and 2) The YCCS survey and the ICSS collect data on youth admissions to and releases from custody and community services. These data are examined based on key case characteristics such as age, sex, Aboriginal/non-Aboriginal identity, most serious offence and length of time served. Data are analyzed at the provincial/territorial as well as national levels.

    Release date: 2007-03-14

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X20060059588
    Description:

    Today, disability is viewed more often as a social construct than a medical one. Educational reforms have changed the way in which children with disabilities are integrated into the school system. With data from the 2001 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey, this article looks at the prevalence of children with disabilities, whether they attend regular classes and the kind of conditions for which they need special services. It examines the issues about access to educational services needed : which services are most needed and used, and what barriers may get in the way of obtaining such services.

    Release date: 2007-02-26

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2007295
    Description:

    In this study, I use new Canadian data containing detailed information on academic abilities, parental influences, financial constraints, and other socio-economic background characteristics of youth to try to account for the large gap in university attendance across the income distribution. I find that 96% of the total gap in university attendance between youth from the top and bottom income quartiles can be accounted for by differences in observable characteristics. Differences in long-term factors such as standardized test scores in reading obtained at age 15, school marks reported at age 15, parental influences, and high-school quality account for 84% of the gap. In contrast, only 12% of the gap is related to financial constraints. Similar results hold across different income quartiles and when I use standardized test scores in mathematics and science. However, reading scores account for a larger proportion of the gap than other test scores.

    Release date: 2007-02-08

Reference (1)

Reference (1) (1 result)

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 89M0024X
    Description:

    The International Youth Survey (IYS) is the Canadian portion of the International Self-Report Delinquency Study (ISRD) which examines the behaviour and misbehaviour of students in grades 7 to 9 in about 30 European countries, United States and Canada. The National Crime Prevention Centre of the federal department of Public Safety sponsored the Canadian survey. The city of Toronto was chosen as the most suitable city where Statistics Canada could conduct the survey and on which the analysis of results would focus.

    The survey needed to be representative of each of the three grades (7 to 9) and at the grade level, of both sexes. In April 2006, about 3,200 students in 176 schools completed the IYS.

    Release date: 2007-09-25

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