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All (34) (25 of 34 results)

  • Articles and reports: 89-637-X2008004
    Description:

    This is one of three fact sheets in the series using information from the 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS) and 2006 Census. The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide information on the topics of access to health professionals, chronic conditions, smoking rates, dental care, barriers to school completion, food insecurity, harvesting country food and country food consumption and sharing. Results are presented for Inuit children aged six to 14 and Inuit aged 15 and over. Findings are for Inuit at the national level, for those in each of the four Inuit regions (Nunatsiavut, Nunavik, Nunavut and the Inuvialuit region) and in some cases, for those outside the Inuit regions.

    Release date: 2008-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 89-637-X2008002
    Description:

    A series of supporting data tables accompanies the Inuit analytical article from the 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS). These tables provide data at the national level, for each of the four Inuit regions (Nunatsiavut, Nunavik, Nunavut and the Inuvialuit region), along with data for Inuit outside these regions for major themes covered in the analytical article. Data for the Inuit identity population aged 15 and over are provided for: Participation in harvesting activities; diagnosed with arthritis/rheumatism, high blood pressure, asthma, stomach problems or intestinal ulcers, heart problems, tuberculosis and diabetes; smoking status; self-rated health status and; reasons for not completing elementary or secondary school. For Inuit children aged 6 to 14, tables include: contact with a pediatrician, general practitioner or family physician in past 12 months; contact with another medical specialist and; food insecurity.

    Release date: 2008-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200800410767
    Description:

    This article uses data from the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) to link the self-rated ability of youth to converse in both English and French at age 21 to the type of language schooling they had received in elementary and high school. YITS collected information on mother tongue, language of school system (at age 15) as well as information (from parents) on whether and when students had been enrolled in some form of immersion, extended or intensive language program. Information was also collected on self-rated ability to converse in French and English. It is therefore possible to look at rates of bilingualism for youth with varying amounts of second-language schooling.

    Release date: 2008-12-16

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200801010730
    Description:

    This Juristat presents a socio-demographic profile of police officers and individuals working in private security occupations. Using the Census of Population and Housing from 1991, 1996, 2001, and 2006 as the primary data sources, employment figures for those working in private security and public policing occupations are provided. Other characteristics of these occupational groups such as gender, age, education, visible minority and Aboriginal status as well as income are also included. The traditional and emerging roles of public police and private security personnel, as well as the systems of governance under which each operates are also discussed.

    Release date: 2008-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 89-637-X2008001
    Description:

    This report presents some initial findings from the 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey for Inuit adults (aged 15 and over) and children (aged 6-14). A determinant of health framework is used. Information on health status is provided through data on self-reported health and chronic conditions. Other factors such as access to health care, smoking, formal education experiences, housing, participation in harvesting activities and country food consumption are examined. Data are shown for Inuit nationally, for each of the four Inuit regions across Inuit Nunaat (the Inuit homeland), and for Inuit living in southern Canada. Some comparisons are made with the total Canadian population and, on occasion, changes since 2001 are examined.

    Release date: 2008-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 89-634-X2008002
    Description:

    This is one of three fact sheets in the series using information from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) and 2006 Census. The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide information on the topics of family (persons involved in raising children, size of families, age of parents, lone parent families), socio-economic status (low-income economic families), feelings about community (as a place to raise children), and cultural activities (participation in traditional activities, having someone to help the child understand Métis history and culture, cultural activities in child care) for Métis children under six years of age.

    Release date: 2008-11-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-634-X2008003
    Description:

    This is one of three fact sheets in the series using information from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) and 2006 Census. The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide information on the topics of family (persons involved in raising children, size of families, age of parents, lone parent families, living with grandparents), socio-economic status (low-income economic families), feelings about community (as a place to raise children), and cultural activities (participation in traditional activities, having someone to help the child understand First Nations history and culture, cultural activities in child care) for First Nations children under six years of age living off reserve.

    Release date: 2008-11-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-634-X2008004
    Description:

    This is one of three fact sheets in the series using information from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) and 2006 Census. The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide information on the topics of family (persons involved in raising children, size of families, age of parents, adoption, living with grandparents), housing conditions (crowding, dwellings in need of major repairs, levels of satisfaction with housing conditions), feelings about community (facilities), and cultural activities (participation in traditional activities, having someone to help the child understand Inuit history and culture, cultural activities in child care). Results are presented for all Inuit children. Some results are also presented for those in Inuit Nunaat (meaning Inuit homeland): Nunatsiavut in northern Labrador, the territory of Nunavut, Nunavik in northern Quebec, and the Inuvialuit Settlement Region in the Northwest Territories.

    Release date: 2008-11-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-634-X200800410724
    Description:

    This is one of three fact sheets in the series using information from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) and 2006 Census. The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide information on the topics of family (persons involved in raising children, size of families, age of parents, adoption, living with grandparents), housing conditions (crowding, dwellings in need of major repairs, levels of satisfaction with housing conditions), feelings about community (facilities), and cultural activities (participation in traditional activities, having someone to help the child understand Inuit history and culture, cultural activities in child care). Results are presented for all Inuit children. Some results are also presented for those in Inuit Nunaat (meaning Inuit homeland): Nunatsiavut in northern Labrador, the territory of Nunavut, Nunavik in northern Quebec, and the Inuvialuit Settlement Region in the Northwest Territories.

    Release date: 2008-11-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-634-X200800310723
    Description:

    This is one of three fact sheets in the series using information from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) and 2006 Census. The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide information on the topics of family (persons involved in raising children, size of families, age of parents, lone parent families, living with grandparents), socio-economic status (low-income economic families), feelings about community (as a place to raise children), and cultural activities (participation in traditional activities, having someone to help the child understand First Nations history and culture, cultural activities in child care) for First Nations children under 6 years of age living off reserve.

    Release date: 2008-11-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-634-X200800210722
    Description:

    This is one of three fact sheets in the series using information from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) and 2006 Census. The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide information on the topics of family (persons involved in raising children, size of families, age of parents, lone parent families), socio-economic status (low-income economic families), feelings about community (as a place to raise children), and cultural activities (participation in traditional activities, having someone to help the child understand Métis history and culture, cultural activities in child care) for Métis children under six years of age.

    Release date: 2008-11-18

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2008070
    Description:

    The analysis for this report is based on data from the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS). The survey was designed by Human Resources and Social Development Canada and Statistics Canada. YITS is a longitudinal survey, which collects information on educational and labour market pathways of a sample of young Canadians in the 18 to 20 age group in 1999. Respondents were asked to provide a range of information on their education and employment experiences as well as information on their personal characteristics. They were interviewed four times since the implementation of the survey, in 2000, 2002, 2004 and 2006. In this report, the data used are from the first four cycles and describe where they stood in their school to work pathway in December 2005 when they were 24 to 26 years of age.

    This report is a follow-up of a previous study of postsecondary participation (Shaienks and Gluszynski, 2007) which found that the overall postsecondary dropout rate was 15%. That rate however, differs across all types of institution and by demographic, family and school characteristics. This paper explores the impact of those characteristics on participation, graduation and dropping out of different types of postsecondary institution.

    Three new variables were developed to account for the type of institution attended by the student and the status in each of them. The university status, the college status and the other postsecondary status allow us to determine independently the outcome of participation in the different types of institution and profile graduates, continuers and especially drop outs according to their specific characteristics.

    Release date: 2008-11-03

  • Articles and reports: 89-634-X2008001
    Description:

    Using data from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) and the 2006 Census, this paper examines the topics of family, community, and child care of Aboriginal (off-reserve First Nations, Métis and Inuit) children under six years of age. The paper explores issues such as family characteristics (size of families, age of parents, living with grandparents, persons involved in raising young Aboriginal children, Aboriginal children living in low-income economic families), feelings about community, cultural activities and child care arrangements. It is designed as a starting point to understanding the social and living conditions in which young Aboriginal children are learning and growing. The report is divided into three parts: First Nations children living off reserve, Métis children, and Inuit children.

    Release date: 2008-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 89-634-X2008005
    Description:

    A series of supporting data tables accompany the analytical article from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS). These supporting data tables provide data at the provincial/regional level for Aboriginal, off-reserve First Nations, Métis and Inuit children under 6 years old for major themes covered in the analytical article: How often the child talks or plays together with different people, focusing attention on each other for five minutes or more; Feelings about home and daily life (housing conditions; support network from family, friends, or others; main job or activity; way spend free time; finances); Feelings about community (as a place with good schools, nursery schools and early childhood education programs; as a place with adequate facilities for children for example, community centres, rinks, gyms, parks; as a safe community; as a place with health facilities; as a place with actively involved members of the community; as a place with First Nations, Métis and Inuit cultural activities); Child care arrangements (percentage of children in child care; percentage of children in a child care arrangement that provides learning opportunities; percentage of children in a child care arrangement that promotes traditional and cultural values and customs); and, Percentage of children living in low-income families.

    Release date: 2008-10-29

  • Table: Summary table
    Release date: 2008-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 89-599-M2008005
    Description:

    This study uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) to examine the relationship between late childbearing (at or after age 35) among first-time mothers in Canada and three facets of development: physical health, behaviour and cognitive development. The following research questions were addressed: do the developmental characteristics of children born to older mothers differ from those of children born to younger mothers? And do other factors, such as demographic characteristics and parenting practices, account for differences in child development by maternal age at birth? For this analysis, first-born children were identified from among all interviewed children whose year of birth was between 1998 and 2005.

    Release date: 2008-09-24

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2008014
    Description:

    This research paper explores youth delinquency using data from the International Youth Survey as self-reported by Toronto youth in 2006. In particular, the study examines how the associations between youth delinquency and age, sex, family composition and generational status are affected by factors related to school, victimization and family and friends. Detailed findings are presented for both property and violent delinquency.

    Release date: 2008-09-16

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200800310682
    Description:

    Tens of thousands of students, from kindergarten to college and university, have gone back to school. In honour of this annual ritual, this issue of Education Matters presents a few facts and figures relating to education, from enrolment trends and household spending on education to educational attainment levels among the Aboriginal population and recent immigrants, and more.

    Release date: 2008-09-04

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200800710658
    Description:

    The annual report on crime statistics presents an analysis of the police-reported data in 2007. These data are presented within the context of both short and long term trends. Data are examined at the national, provincial and territorial levels, as well as for major metropolitan areas by type of crime. The report distinguishes between violent crime, property crime, other Criminal Code offences, impaired driving, drug offences and youth crime.

    Release date: 2008-07-17

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-627-X
    Description:

    This series of fact sheets and accompanying reports examines issues affecting Inuit in Canada. The main focus is on those living in the four Inuit land claim settlement regions in the Arctic: Nunatsiavut in northern Labrador, the territory of Nunavut, Nunavik in northern Quebec, and the Inuvialuit Settlement Region in the Northwest Territories.

    Release date: 2008-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 89-627-X2008004
    Description:

    This is the second report in the series using information from the 2001 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS). The purpose of this report is to provide information on the leisure time activities of Inuit children (ages 4 to 14). Specific activities include: sport participation, art or music activities, clubs or groups, cultural activities, time spent with elders, and sedentary activities. Results are presented for all Inuit children and specifically for those in the four Inuit land claim settlement regions in the Arctic: Nunatsiavut in northern Labrador, the territory of Nunavut, Nunavik in northern Quebec, and the Inuvialuit Settlement Region in the Northwest Territories. Where possible, results for Inuit children are compared to those of all Canadian children.

    Release date: 2008-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 89-627-X2008005
    Description:

    This is the third fact sheet in the series using information from the 2001 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS). The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide information on the leisure time activities of Inuit children (ages 4 to 14). Specific activities include: sport participation, art or music activities, clubs or groups, cultural activities, time spent with elders, and sedentary activities. Results are presented for all Inuit children and specifically for those in the four Inuit land claim settlement regions in the Arctic: Nunatsiavut in northern Labrador, the territory of Nunavut, Nunavik in northern Quebec, and the Inuvialuit Settlement Region in the Northwest Territories. Where possible, results for Inuit children are compared to those of all Canadian children.

    Release date: 2008-06-20

  • Index and guides: 97-559-G2006003
    Description:

    This guide focuses on the following topics: Labour market activity and Unpaid work.

    Provides information that enables users to effectively use, apply and interpret data from the 2006 Census. Each guide contains definitions and explanations on census concepts, data quality and historical comparability. Additional information will be included for specific variables to help general users better understand the concepts and questions used in the census.

    Release date: 2008-06-10

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200800110573
    Description:

    This article will examine trends in organized sports participation of children aged 5 to 14, and the important role that the family plays. It will also look at the factors that influence children's participation in sports including parental involvement in sports, socio-demographic characteristics of the family, and geography.

    Release date: 2008-06-03

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 89-631-X
    Description:

    This report highlights the latest developments and rationale behind recent cycles of the General Social Survey (GSS). Starting with an overview of the GSS mandate and historic cycle topics, we then focus on two recent cycles related to families in Canada: Family Transitions (2006) and Family, Social Support and Retirement (2007). Finally, we give a summary of what is to come in the 2008 GSS on Social Networks, and describe a special project to mark 'Twenty Years of GSS'.

    The survey collects data over a twelve month period from the population living in private households in the 10 provinces. For all cycles except Cycles 16 and 21, the population aged 15 and older has been sampled. Cycles 16 and 21 sampled persons aged 45 and older.

    Cycle 20 (GSS 2006) is the fourth cycle of the GSS to collect data on families (the first three cycles on the family were in 1990, 1995 and 2001). Cycle 20 covers much the same content as previous cycles on families with some sections revised and expanded. The data enable analysts to measure conjugal and fertility history (chronology of marriages, common-law unions, and children), family origins, children's home leaving, fertility intentions, child custody as well as work history and other socioeconomic characteristics. Questions on financial support agreements or arrangements (for children and the ex-spouse or ex-partner) for separated and divorced families have been modified. Also, sections on social networks, well-being and housing characteristics have been added.

    Release date: 2008-05-27

Data (3)

Data (3) (3 results)

Analysis (28)

Analysis (28) (25 of 28 results)

  • Articles and reports: 89-637-X2008004
    Description:

    This is one of three fact sheets in the series using information from the 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS) and 2006 Census. The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide information on the topics of access to health professionals, chronic conditions, smoking rates, dental care, barriers to school completion, food insecurity, harvesting country food and country food consumption and sharing. Results are presented for Inuit children aged six to 14 and Inuit aged 15 and over. Findings are for Inuit at the national level, for those in each of the four Inuit regions (Nunatsiavut, Nunavik, Nunavut and the Inuvialuit region) and in some cases, for those outside the Inuit regions.

    Release date: 2008-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 89-637-X2008002
    Description:

    A series of supporting data tables accompanies the Inuit analytical article from the 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS). These tables provide data at the national level, for each of the four Inuit regions (Nunatsiavut, Nunavik, Nunavut and the Inuvialuit region), along with data for Inuit outside these regions for major themes covered in the analytical article. Data for the Inuit identity population aged 15 and over are provided for: Participation in harvesting activities; diagnosed with arthritis/rheumatism, high blood pressure, asthma, stomach problems or intestinal ulcers, heart problems, tuberculosis and diabetes; smoking status; self-rated health status and; reasons for not completing elementary or secondary school. For Inuit children aged 6 to 14, tables include: contact with a pediatrician, general practitioner or family physician in past 12 months; contact with another medical specialist and; food insecurity.

    Release date: 2008-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200800410767
    Description:

    This article uses data from the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS) to link the self-rated ability of youth to converse in both English and French at age 21 to the type of language schooling they had received in elementary and high school. YITS collected information on mother tongue, language of school system (at age 15) as well as information (from parents) on whether and when students had been enrolled in some form of immersion, extended or intensive language program. Information was also collected on self-rated ability to converse in French and English. It is therefore possible to look at rates of bilingualism for youth with varying amounts of second-language schooling.

    Release date: 2008-12-16

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200801010730
    Description:

    This Juristat presents a socio-demographic profile of police officers and individuals working in private security occupations. Using the Census of Population and Housing from 1991, 1996, 2001, and 2006 as the primary data sources, employment figures for those working in private security and public policing occupations are provided. Other characteristics of these occupational groups such as gender, age, education, visible minority and Aboriginal status as well as income are also included. The traditional and emerging roles of public police and private security personnel, as well as the systems of governance under which each operates are also discussed.

    Release date: 2008-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 89-637-X2008001
    Description:

    This report presents some initial findings from the 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey for Inuit adults (aged 15 and over) and children (aged 6-14). A determinant of health framework is used. Information on health status is provided through data on self-reported health and chronic conditions. Other factors such as access to health care, smoking, formal education experiences, housing, participation in harvesting activities and country food consumption are examined. Data are shown for Inuit nationally, for each of the four Inuit regions across Inuit Nunaat (the Inuit homeland), and for Inuit living in southern Canada. Some comparisons are made with the total Canadian population and, on occasion, changes since 2001 are examined.

    Release date: 2008-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 89-634-X2008002
    Description:

    This is one of three fact sheets in the series using information from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) and 2006 Census. The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide information on the topics of family (persons involved in raising children, size of families, age of parents, lone parent families), socio-economic status (low-income economic families), feelings about community (as a place to raise children), and cultural activities (participation in traditional activities, having someone to help the child understand Métis history and culture, cultural activities in child care) for Métis children under six years of age.

    Release date: 2008-11-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-634-X2008003
    Description:

    This is one of three fact sheets in the series using information from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) and 2006 Census. The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide information on the topics of family (persons involved in raising children, size of families, age of parents, lone parent families, living with grandparents), socio-economic status (low-income economic families), feelings about community (as a place to raise children), and cultural activities (participation in traditional activities, having someone to help the child understand First Nations history and culture, cultural activities in child care) for First Nations children under six years of age living off reserve.

    Release date: 2008-11-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-634-X2008004
    Description:

    This is one of three fact sheets in the series using information from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) and 2006 Census. The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide information on the topics of family (persons involved in raising children, size of families, age of parents, adoption, living with grandparents), housing conditions (crowding, dwellings in need of major repairs, levels of satisfaction with housing conditions), feelings about community (facilities), and cultural activities (participation in traditional activities, having someone to help the child understand Inuit history and culture, cultural activities in child care). Results are presented for all Inuit children. Some results are also presented for those in Inuit Nunaat (meaning Inuit homeland): Nunatsiavut in northern Labrador, the territory of Nunavut, Nunavik in northern Quebec, and the Inuvialuit Settlement Region in the Northwest Territories.

    Release date: 2008-11-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-634-X200800410724
    Description:

    This is one of three fact sheets in the series using information from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) and 2006 Census. The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide information on the topics of family (persons involved in raising children, size of families, age of parents, adoption, living with grandparents), housing conditions (crowding, dwellings in need of major repairs, levels of satisfaction with housing conditions), feelings about community (facilities), and cultural activities (participation in traditional activities, having someone to help the child understand Inuit history and culture, cultural activities in child care). Results are presented for all Inuit children. Some results are also presented for those in Inuit Nunaat (meaning Inuit homeland): Nunatsiavut in northern Labrador, the territory of Nunavut, Nunavik in northern Quebec, and the Inuvialuit Settlement Region in the Northwest Territories.

    Release date: 2008-11-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-634-X200800310723
    Description:

    This is one of three fact sheets in the series using information from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) and 2006 Census. The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide information on the topics of family (persons involved in raising children, size of families, age of parents, lone parent families, living with grandparents), socio-economic status (low-income economic families), feelings about community (as a place to raise children), and cultural activities (participation in traditional activities, having someone to help the child understand First Nations history and culture, cultural activities in child care) for First Nations children under 6 years of age living off reserve.

    Release date: 2008-11-18

  • Articles and reports: 89-634-X200800210722
    Description:

    This is one of three fact sheets in the series using information from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) and 2006 Census. The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide information on the topics of family (persons involved in raising children, size of families, age of parents, lone parent families), socio-economic status (low-income economic families), feelings about community (as a place to raise children), and cultural activities (participation in traditional activities, having someone to help the child understand Métis history and culture, cultural activities in child care) for Métis children under six years of age.

    Release date: 2008-11-18

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2008070
    Description:

    The analysis for this report is based on data from the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS). The survey was designed by Human Resources and Social Development Canada and Statistics Canada. YITS is a longitudinal survey, which collects information on educational and labour market pathways of a sample of young Canadians in the 18 to 20 age group in 1999. Respondents were asked to provide a range of information on their education and employment experiences as well as information on their personal characteristics. They were interviewed four times since the implementation of the survey, in 2000, 2002, 2004 and 2006. In this report, the data used are from the first four cycles and describe where they stood in their school to work pathway in December 2005 when they were 24 to 26 years of age.

    This report is a follow-up of a previous study of postsecondary participation (Shaienks and Gluszynski, 2007) which found that the overall postsecondary dropout rate was 15%. That rate however, differs across all types of institution and by demographic, family and school characteristics. This paper explores the impact of those characteristics on participation, graduation and dropping out of different types of postsecondary institution.

    Three new variables were developed to account for the type of institution attended by the student and the status in each of them. The university status, the college status and the other postsecondary status allow us to determine independently the outcome of participation in the different types of institution and profile graduates, continuers and especially drop outs according to their specific characteristics.

    Release date: 2008-11-03

  • Articles and reports: 89-634-X2008001
    Description:

    Using data from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) and the 2006 Census, this paper examines the topics of family, community, and child care of Aboriginal (off-reserve First Nations, Métis and Inuit) children under six years of age. The paper explores issues such as family characteristics (size of families, age of parents, living with grandparents, persons involved in raising young Aboriginal children, Aboriginal children living in low-income economic families), feelings about community, cultural activities and child care arrangements. It is designed as a starting point to understanding the social and living conditions in which young Aboriginal children are learning and growing. The report is divided into three parts: First Nations children living off reserve, Métis children, and Inuit children.

    Release date: 2008-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 89-634-X2008005
    Description:

    A series of supporting data tables accompany the analytical article from the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS). These supporting data tables provide data at the provincial/regional level for Aboriginal, off-reserve First Nations, Métis and Inuit children under 6 years old for major themes covered in the analytical article: How often the child talks or plays together with different people, focusing attention on each other for five minutes or more; Feelings about home and daily life (housing conditions; support network from family, friends, or others; main job or activity; way spend free time; finances); Feelings about community (as a place with good schools, nursery schools and early childhood education programs; as a place with adequate facilities for children for example, community centres, rinks, gyms, parks; as a safe community; as a place with health facilities; as a place with actively involved members of the community; as a place with First Nations, Métis and Inuit cultural activities); Child care arrangements (percentage of children in child care; percentage of children in a child care arrangement that provides learning opportunities; percentage of children in a child care arrangement that promotes traditional and cultural values and customs); and, Percentage of children living in low-income families.

    Release date: 2008-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 89-599-M2008005
    Description:

    This study uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) to examine the relationship between late childbearing (at or after age 35) among first-time mothers in Canada and three facets of development: physical health, behaviour and cognitive development. The following research questions were addressed: do the developmental characteristics of children born to older mothers differ from those of children born to younger mothers? And do other factors, such as demographic characteristics and parenting practices, account for differences in child development by maternal age at birth? For this analysis, first-born children were identified from among all interviewed children whose year of birth was between 1998 and 2005.

    Release date: 2008-09-24

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2008014
    Description:

    This research paper explores youth delinquency using data from the International Youth Survey as self-reported by Toronto youth in 2006. In particular, the study examines how the associations between youth delinquency and age, sex, family composition and generational status are affected by factors related to school, victimization and family and friends. Detailed findings are presented for both property and violent delinquency.

    Release date: 2008-09-16

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200800310682
    Description:

    Tens of thousands of students, from kindergarten to college and university, have gone back to school. In honour of this annual ritual, this issue of Education Matters presents a few facts and figures relating to education, from enrolment trends and household spending on education to educational attainment levels among the Aboriginal population and recent immigrants, and more.

    Release date: 2008-09-04

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200800710658
    Description:

    The annual report on crime statistics presents an analysis of the police-reported data in 2007. These data are presented within the context of both short and long term trends. Data are examined at the national, provincial and territorial levels, as well as for major metropolitan areas by type of crime. The report distinguishes between violent crime, property crime, other Criminal Code offences, impaired driving, drug offences and youth crime.

    Release date: 2008-07-17

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-627-X
    Description:

    This series of fact sheets and accompanying reports examines issues affecting Inuit in Canada. The main focus is on those living in the four Inuit land claim settlement regions in the Arctic: Nunatsiavut in northern Labrador, the territory of Nunavut, Nunavik in northern Quebec, and the Inuvialuit Settlement Region in the Northwest Territories.

    Release date: 2008-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 89-627-X2008004
    Description:

    This is the second report in the series using information from the 2001 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS). The purpose of this report is to provide information on the leisure time activities of Inuit children (ages 4 to 14). Specific activities include: sport participation, art or music activities, clubs or groups, cultural activities, time spent with elders, and sedentary activities. Results are presented for all Inuit children and specifically for those in the four Inuit land claim settlement regions in the Arctic: Nunatsiavut in northern Labrador, the territory of Nunavut, Nunavik in northern Quebec, and the Inuvialuit Settlement Region in the Northwest Territories. Where possible, results for Inuit children are compared to those of all Canadian children.

    Release date: 2008-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 89-627-X2008005
    Description:

    This is the third fact sheet in the series using information from the 2001 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS). The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide information on the leisure time activities of Inuit children (ages 4 to 14). Specific activities include: sport participation, art or music activities, clubs or groups, cultural activities, time spent with elders, and sedentary activities. Results are presented for all Inuit children and specifically for those in the four Inuit land claim settlement regions in the Arctic: Nunatsiavut in northern Labrador, the territory of Nunavut, Nunavik in northern Quebec, and the Inuvialuit Settlement Region in the Northwest Territories. Where possible, results for Inuit children are compared to those of all Canadian children.

    Release date: 2008-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200800110573
    Description:

    This article will examine trends in organized sports participation of children aged 5 to 14, and the important role that the family plays. It will also look at the factors that influence children's participation in sports including parental involvement in sports, socio-demographic characteristics of the family, and geography.

    Release date: 2008-06-03

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200800410568
    Description:

    This series of reports provides detailed statistics and analysis on a variety of topics and issues concerning Canada's justice system. The annual Juristat, Youth Court Statistics, 2006/2007, summarizes trends from provincial/territorial youth courts across Canada, which provide data to the Integrated Criminal Court Survey. In this Juristat, information is presented on the characteristics of cases and accused youth, sentencing and related issues.

    Release date: 2008-05-20

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200800310566
    Description:

    This report analyzes police-reported data on crimes committed by youth aged 12 to 17 in Canada in 2006. An examination of trends in youth crime since the 1991 peak as well as more recent trends with particular reference to the period following the implementation of the Youth Criminal Justice Act (YCJA) in 2003 is also presented.

    The report distinguishes between violent crime, property crime, 'other' Criminal Code offences and drug-related offences. Changes in the use of formal charges versus alternate means to handle youth accused of a crime following the introduction of the YCJA are also examined. Other topics discussed include youth crimes occurring at school, the presence of weapons in youth crime, and changes to youth court caseloads and youth correctional services after the implementation of the YCJA. Data from the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey (UCR) are presented within the context of both short and long term trends and at the national, provincial and territorial levels. The data are intended to respond to the needs of those who work in the criminal justice system as well as to inform researchers, policy analysts, academics, the media and the public on the nature and extent of youth crime in Canada.

    Release date: 2008-05-16

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2008055
    Description:

    Dropout rates, defined as the proportion of 20 to 24 year-olds without a high school diploma and not attending school, have been trending downward. Data from the Labour Force Survey shows that the rate for men fell from 21% in 1990/1991 to 14% in 2004/2005; for women, the rates were 16% in 1990/1991 and 9% in 2004/2005. Many dropouts later return to school, taking advantage of the 'second-chance' educational opportunities offered by provinces and institutions across Canada.

    This report uses data from the Youth in Transition Survey to analyze the determinants of the return-to-school. The analysis finds that dropout rates are lower among young women than among young men and that, if they do dropout before completing high school, young women are also more likely to return to school than young men.

    Young male and female dropouts are influenced by different factors in their decision to return to school. For young male dropouts, two of the strongest predictors of the decision to return to school are their parents' education and having taken, in high school, a mathematics course designed to prepare them for postsecondary studies. Young men who dropped out in their last year of high school were more likely to return to school than their counterparts who had dropped out earlier. For young women, time elapsed since leaving school is the most influential factor. However, young women who left school due to personal reasons (most often, pregnancy) are 30% more likely to return than other female dropouts.

    Release date: 2008-04-09

Reference (3)

Reference (3) (3 results)

  • Index and guides: 97-559-G2006003
    Description:

    This guide focuses on the following topics: Labour market activity and Unpaid work.

    Provides information that enables users to effectively use, apply and interpret data from the 2006 Census. Each guide contains definitions and explanations on census concepts, data quality and historical comparability. Additional information will be included for specific variables to help general users better understand the concepts and questions used in the census.

    Release date: 2008-06-10

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 89-631-X
    Description:

    This report highlights the latest developments and rationale behind recent cycles of the General Social Survey (GSS). Starting with an overview of the GSS mandate and historic cycle topics, we then focus on two recent cycles related to families in Canada: Family Transitions (2006) and Family, Social Support and Retirement (2007). Finally, we give a summary of what is to come in the 2008 GSS on Social Networks, and describe a special project to mark 'Twenty Years of GSS'.

    The survey collects data over a twelve month period from the population living in private households in the 10 provinces. For all cycles except Cycles 16 and 21, the population aged 15 and older has been sampled. Cycles 16 and 21 sampled persons aged 45 and older.

    Cycle 20 (GSS 2006) is the fourth cycle of the GSS to collect data on families (the first three cycles on the family were in 1990, 1995 and 2001). Cycle 20 covers much the same content as previous cycles on families with some sections revised and expanded. The data enable analysts to measure conjugal and fertility history (chronology of marriages, common-law unions, and children), family origins, children's home leaving, fertility intentions, child custody as well as work history and other socioeconomic characteristics. Questions on financial support agreements or arrangements (for children and the ex-spouse or ex-partner) for separated and divorced families have been modified. Also, sections on social networks, well-being and housing characteristics have been added.

    Release date: 2008-05-27

  • Index and guides: 97-559-P2006003
    Description:

    This guide focuses on the following topics: Labour market activity and Unpaid work.

    Provides information that enables users to effectively use, apply and interpret data from the 2006 Census. Each guide contains definitions and explanations on census concepts. Additional information will be included for specific variables to help general users better understand the concepts and questions used in the census.

    Release date: 2008-04-08

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