Statistics by subject – Children and youth

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  • Articles and reports: 89-638-X200900211060
    Description:

    This product is a series of profiles for a number of census metropolitan areas, census agglomerations and communities across Canada with a large Aboriginal population, either in numbers or share of the area's total population. The series aims to present a demographic and socio-economic profile of the total Aboriginal population living in these areas. Demographic Data as well as information on living arrangements of children, education, labour, income, mobility, housing, and health are highlighted. While most of the focus is on adults, there is also limited information provided on children. Data showing comparisons between Aboriginal groups are provided for selected variables, as are comparisons with the non-Aboriginal population. Findings are based on the 2006 Census and the 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey.

    Release date: 2009-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 89-638-X200900211058
    Description:

    This product is a series of profiles for a number of census metropolitan areas, census agglomerations and communities across Canada with a large Aboriginal population, either in numbers or share of the area's total population. The series aims to present a demographic and socio-economic profile of the total Aboriginal population living in these areas. Demographic Data as well as information on living arrangements of children, education, labour, income, mobility, housing, and health are highlighted. While most of the focus is on adults, there is also limited information provided on children. Data showing comparisons between Aboriginal groups are provided for selected variables, as are comparisons with the non-Aboriginal population. Findings are based on the 2006 Census and the 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey.

    Release date: 2009-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 89-638-X200900211059
    Description:

    This product is a series of profiles for a number of census metropolitan areas, census agglomerations and communities across Canada with a large Aboriginal population, either in numbers or share of the area's total population. The series aims to present a demographic and socio-economic profile of the total Aboriginal population living in these areas. Demographic Data as well as information on living arrangements of children, education, labour, income, mobility, housing, and health are highlighted. While most of the focus is on adults, there is also limited information provided on children. Data showing comparisons between Aboriginal groups are provided for selected variables, as are comparisons with the non-Aboriginal population. Findings are based on the 2006 Census and the 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey.

    Release date: 2009-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 89-638-X200900211062
    Description:

    This product is a series of profiles for a number of census metropolitan areas, census agglomerations and communities across Canada with a large Aboriginal population, either in numbers or share of the area's total population. The series aims to present a demographic and socio-economic profile of the total Aboriginal population living in these areas. Demographic Data as well as information on living arrangements of children, education, labour, income, mobility, housing, and health are highlighted. While most of the focus is on adults, there is also limited information provided on children. Data showing comparisons between Aboriginal groups are provided for selected variables, as are comparisons with the non-Aboriginal population. Findings are based on the 2006 Census and the 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey.

    Release date: 2009-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 89-638-X200900211061
    Description:

    This product is a series of profiles for a number of census metropolitan areas, census agglomerations and communities across Canada with a large Aboriginal population, either in numbers or share of the area's total population. The series aims to present a demographic and socio-economic profile of the total Aboriginal population living in these areas. Demographic Data as well as information on living arrangements of children, education, labour, income, mobility, housing, and health are highlighted. While most of the focus is on adults, there is also limited information provided on children. Data showing comparisons between Aboriginal groups are provided for selected variables, as are comparisons with the non-Aboriginal population. Findings are based on the 2006 Census and the 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey.

    Release date: 2009-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 81-599-X2009004
    Description:

    This fact sheet provides information on the proportion of the school-age population - defined as children and youth aged 5 to 24 - living in low-income circumstances, including the duration of low-income spells, using data from Statistics Canada's Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID). The percentage of children in low-income is calculated based on Statistics Canada's low income cut-offs (LICOs), using data on family income after government benefits are received and after federal and provincial taxes are paid.

    Release date: 2009-12-16

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200900511050
    Description:

    This article draws on information contained in the Postsecondary Student Information System (PSIS), which includes annual data from 1992 to 2007, to provide an overview of trends in university graduations in Canada and the provinces. That overview provides an overall view of the characteristics of university graduates over the period, from trends in the gender and age composition of graduates and in the share of graduates accounted for by international students to changes in the fields of study chosen by graduates.

    Release date: 2009-12-16

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200900511049
    Description:

    This article highlights a few of the findings of a recent report published by Statistics Canada that analyzed trends in the age of education infrastructure in Canada over the period between 1961 and 2008, using data from the Capital and Repair Expenditures Survey. The article explains how changes in the age of education infrastructure are measured and provides an overview of trends in the average age of education infrastructure, by education level, at both the national and provincial levels.

    Release date: 2009-12-16

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900211021
    Description:

    This article identifies factors that influence the social engagement of children with disabilities aged 5 to 14. The emphasis is put on participation in social activities outside the family home and normal school hours.

    Release date: 2009-12-11

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-634-X
    Description:

    The Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) provides an extensive set of data about Aboriginal (Métis, Inuit, and off-reserve First Nations) children under 6 years of age in urban, rural, and northern locations across Canada. The Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) was designed to provide a picture of the early development of Aboriginal children and the social and living conditions in which they are learning and growing.

    The survey was developed by Statistics Canada and Aboriginal advisors from across the country and was conducted jointly with Human Resources and Social Development Canada.

    Release date: 2009-11-25

  • Articles and reports: 89-634-X2009008
    Description:

    The Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) is a parent-reported instrument designed to provide information on children's behaviours and relationships. The SDQ consists of 25 items which are grouped into five subscales: (1) pro-social, (2) inattention-hyperactivity, (3) emotional symptoms, (4) conduct problems, and (5) peer problems. The SDQ was used to provide information on children aged 2 to 5 years in the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS). Though validated on general populations, the constructs of the SDQ have not been validated for off-reserve First Nations, Métis and Inuit children in Canada. The first objective of this evaluation is to examine if the five subscales of the SDQ demonstrate construct validity and reliability for off-reserve First Nations, Métis and Inuit children. The second objective is to examine if an alternative set of subscales, using the 25 SDQ items, may be more valid and reliable for off-reserve First Nations, Métis and Inuit children.

    Release date: 2009-11-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200901111023
    Description:

    A look at how the labour market changed between October 2008 and 2009.

    Release date: 2009-11-12

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2009320
    Description:

    Do students know the education required to achieve their career objectives? Is this information related to their education pathways? To address these questions, the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS), Cohort A is used to compare high school students' perceptions of the level of education they will require for the job they intend to hold at age 30, with the level required according to professional job analysts at Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC). The focus is on students intending to work in a job which requires a university degree, and examine the correlation between the knowledge of educational requirements and subsequent university enrolment. The results suggest that about three out of four students intending to work in a job requiring a university degree are aware of the education they will require. Evidence suggests that knowledge of educational requirements is related to academic performance and socio-economic background. Differences by intended occupation are quite small. Moreover, students who know that a university degree is required are more likely to attend university, even after accounting for differences in academic performance, sex, and socioeconomic background. In fact, the knowledge of educational requirements is as strongly related to university attendance as other well-documented correlates such as sex, academic performance and parental education. Finally, higher university attendance rates are observed when students learn earlier (rather than later), that a university degree is required for their intended job.

    Release date: 2009-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200900410931
    Description:

    Based on information available from the 2006 General Social Survey on families, this article will explore the nature of time children spend with their separated or divorced parents. Issues to be explored will include: the type of visitation/access arrangements; the length of time spent with each parent; whether the time involves leisure activities, regular care (school, daycare, social) and decision-making activities; and whether parents are satisfied with the arrangements they have for visitation/access.

    Release date: 2009-10-28

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-599-M
    Description:

    This research paper series addresses many topics related to children and youth in Canada, including: cognitive, physical and emotional development; health; behaviour; relationships with others; experiences in the home, at school and at work; family change; and transitions to adulthood. The main data source for the papers in this series is the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth.

    Release date: 2009-09-25

  • Articles and reports: 89-599-M2009006
    Description:

    This study used data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) to provide a picture of Canadian 9-year-old children at the transition between the primary grades and the junior grades in school. The children varied widely in their academic achievement, and some of these variations were linked to their gender, their family income level, and their province of residence. Marked differences were also found in the education environments of children, linked most consistently to family income levels. These education environments were not linked to academic success as measured by mathematics achievement at school. Academic achievement at age 9 was significantly related to school readiness four years earlier.

    Release date: 2009-09-25

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2009017
    Description:

    This study examined the influence of school, neighbourhood and student characteristics on the likelihood of students committing violent delinquency. Based on data from the International Youth Survey (2006), findings indicated that there was significant variation in violent delinquency across Toronto schools. In part, this variation was explained by the school climate, or the perceived atmosphere in the school. In particular, a higher level of school capital (positive feeling toward the school) reduced students' chances of committing violent behaviour over and above any of their own risk factors. In contrast, the findings did not support the contention that the level of crime and/or socioeconomic disadvantage in the neighbourhoods surrounding schools had an influence on students' violent behaviour.

    Release date: 2009-09-15

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200900310922
    Description:

    Tens of thousands of students, from kindergarten to college and university, have gone back to school. In honour of this annual ritual, this issue of Education Matters presents a few facts and figures relating to education, from enrolment trends to mobility of apprenticeship completers and barriers to training access, and more.

    Release date: 2009-09-08

  • Public use microdata: 89M0027X
    Description:

    The 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS) provides data on the social and economic conditions of First Nations people living off reserve, Métis and Inuit. Its specific purpose was to identify the needs of Aboriginal people focusing on issues such as health, language, employment, income, schooling, housing, and mobility. The survey was designed and implemented in partnership with national Aboriginal organizations.

    This product contains information for the Aboriginal child and youth population (6 to 14 years).

    Release date: 2009-08-26

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2009075
    Description:

    The analysis for this report is based on data from the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS). The survey was designed by Human Resources and Social Development Canada and Statistics Canada. YITS is a longitudinal survey, which collects information on educational and labour market pathways of a sample of young Canadians in the 18 to 20 age group in 1999. Respondents were asked to provide a range of information on their education and employment experiences as well as information on their personal characteristics. They were interviewed four times since the implementation of the survey, in 2000, 2002, 2004 and 2006. In this report, the data used are from the five cycles and describe where they stood in their school to work pathway in December 2007 when they were 26 to 28 years of age.

    Release date: 2009-07-09

  • Articles and reports: 89-637-X2009005
    Description:

    A series of supporting data tables accompanies the Métis analytical article from the 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS). These tables provide data at the provincial/regional level for the Métis identity population (aged 15 and older) for some of the major themes covered in the analytical article, including: self rated health status; percentage diagnosed with arthritis/rheumatism, high blood pressure, stomach problems or intestinal ulcers, asthma and diabetes; having a regular family doctor; not receiving health care when needed and; reasons for not completing elementary or secondary school. For Métis children aged 6 to 14, tables include: self-rated health status; frequency of participation in sports and; contact with a pediatrician, general practitioner or family physician in the past 12 months.

    Release date: 2009-03-26

Data (8)

Data (8) (8 of 8 results)

Analysis (27)

Analysis (27) (25 of 27 results)

  • Articles and reports: 89-638-X200900211060
    Description:

    This product is a series of profiles for a number of census metropolitan areas, census agglomerations and communities across Canada with a large Aboriginal population, either in numbers or share of the area's total population. The series aims to present a demographic and socio-economic profile of the total Aboriginal population living in these areas. Demographic Data as well as information on living arrangements of children, education, labour, income, mobility, housing, and health are highlighted. While most of the focus is on adults, there is also limited information provided on children. Data showing comparisons between Aboriginal groups are provided for selected variables, as are comparisons with the non-Aboriginal population. Findings are based on the 2006 Census and the 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey.

    Release date: 2009-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 89-638-X200900211058
    Description:

    This product is a series of profiles for a number of census metropolitan areas, census agglomerations and communities across Canada with a large Aboriginal population, either in numbers or share of the area's total population. The series aims to present a demographic and socio-economic profile of the total Aboriginal population living in these areas. Demographic Data as well as information on living arrangements of children, education, labour, income, mobility, housing, and health are highlighted. While most of the focus is on adults, there is also limited information provided on children. Data showing comparisons between Aboriginal groups are provided for selected variables, as are comparisons with the non-Aboriginal population. Findings are based on the 2006 Census and the 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey.

    Release date: 2009-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 89-638-X200900211059
    Description:

    This product is a series of profiles for a number of census metropolitan areas, census agglomerations and communities across Canada with a large Aboriginal population, either in numbers or share of the area's total population. The series aims to present a demographic and socio-economic profile of the total Aboriginal population living in these areas. Demographic Data as well as information on living arrangements of children, education, labour, income, mobility, housing, and health are highlighted. While most of the focus is on adults, there is also limited information provided on children. Data showing comparisons between Aboriginal groups are provided for selected variables, as are comparisons with the non-Aboriginal population. Findings are based on the 2006 Census and the 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey.

    Release date: 2009-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 89-638-X200900211062
    Description:

    This product is a series of profiles for a number of census metropolitan areas, census agglomerations and communities across Canada with a large Aboriginal population, either in numbers or share of the area's total population. The series aims to present a demographic and socio-economic profile of the total Aboriginal population living in these areas. Demographic Data as well as information on living arrangements of children, education, labour, income, mobility, housing, and health are highlighted. While most of the focus is on adults, there is also limited information provided on children. Data showing comparisons between Aboriginal groups are provided for selected variables, as are comparisons with the non-Aboriginal population. Findings are based on the 2006 Census and the 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey.

    Release date: 2009-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 89-638-X200900211061
    Description:

    This product is a series of profiles for a number of census metropolitan areas, census agglomerations and communities across Canada with a large Aboriginal population, either in numbers or share of the area's total population. The series aims to present a demographic and socio-economic profile of the total Aboriginal population living in these areas. Demographic Data as well as information on living arrangements of children, education, labour, income, mobility, housing, and health are highlighted. While most of the focus is on adults, there is also limited information provided on children. Data showing comparisons between Aboriginal groups are provided for selected variables, as are comparisons with the non-Aboriginal population. Findings are based on the 2006 Census and the 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey.

    Release date: 2009-12-17

  • Articles and reports: 81-599-X2009004
    Description:

    This fact sheet provides information on the proportion of the school-age population - defined as children and youth aged 5 to 24 - living in low-income circumstances, including the duration of low-income spells, using data from Statistics Canada's Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID). The percentage of children in low-income is calculated based on Statistics Canada's low income cut-offs (LICOs), using data on family income after government benefits are received and after federal and provincial taxes are paid.

    Release date: 2009-12-16

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200900511050
    Description:

    This article draws on information contained in the Postsecondary Student Information System (PSIS), which includes annual data from 1992 to 2007, to provide an overview of trends in university graduations in Canada and the provinces. That overview provides an overall view of the characteristics of university graduates over the period, from trends in the gender and age composition of graduates and in the share of graduates accounted for by international students to changes in the fields of study chosen by graduates.

    Release date: 2009-12-16

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200900511049
    Description:

    This article highlights a few of the findings of a recent report published by Statistics Canada that analyzed trends in the age of education infrastructure in Canada over the period between 1961 and 2008, using data from the Capital and Repair Expenditures Survey. The article explains how changes in the age of education infrastructure are measured and provides an overview of trends in the average age of education infrastructure, by education level, at both the national and provincial levels.

    Release date: 2009-12-16

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900211021
    Description:

    This article identifies factors that influence the social engagement of children with disabilities aged 5 to 14. The emphasis is put on participation in social activities outside the family home and normal school hours.

    Release date: 2009-12-11

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-634-X
    Description:

    The Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) provides an extensive set of data about Aboriginal (Métis, Inuit, and off-reserve First Nations) children under 6 years of age in urban, rural, and northern locations across Canada. The Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS) was designed to provide a picture of the early development of Aboriginal children and the social and living conditions in which they are learning and growing.

    The survey was developed by Statistics Canada and Aboriginal advisors from across the country and was conducted jointly with Human Resources and Social Development Canada.

    Release date: 2009-11-25

  • Articles and reports: 89-634-X2009008
    Description:

    The Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) is a parent-reported instrument designed to provide information on children's behaviours and relationships. The SDQ consists of 25 items which are grouped into five subscales: (1) pro-social, (2) inattention-hyperactivity, (3) emotional symptoms, (4) conduct problems, and (5) peer problems. The SDQ was used to provide information on children aged 2 to 5 years in the 2006 Aboriginal Children's Survey (ACS). Though validated on general populations, the constructs of the SDQ have not been validated for off-reserve First Nations, Métis and Inuit children in Canada. The first objective of this evaluation is to examine if the five subscales of the SDQ demonstrate construct validity and reliability for off-reserve First Nations, Métis and Inuit children. The second objective is to examine if an alternative set of subscales, using the 25 SDQ items, may be more valid and reliable for off-reserve First Nations, Métis and Inuit children.

    Release date: 2009-11-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X200901111023
    Description:

    A look at how the labour market changed between October 2008 and 2009.

    Release date: 2009-11-12

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2009320
    Description:

    Do students know the education required to achieve their career objectives? Is this information related to their education pathways? To address these questions, the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS), Cohort A is used to compare high school students' perceptions of the level of education they will require for the job they intend to hold at age 30, with the level required according to professional job analysts at Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (HRSDC). The focus is on students intending to work in a job which requires a university degree, and examine the correlation between the knowledge of educational requirements and subsequent university enrolment. The results suggest that about three out of four students intending to work in a job requiring a university degree are aware of the education they will require. Evidence suggests that knowledge of educational requirements is related to academic performance and socio-economic background. Differences by intended occupation are quite small. Moreover, students who know that a university degree is required are more likely to attend university, even after accounting for differences in academic performance, sex, and socioeconomic background. In fact, the knowledge of educational requirements is as strongly related to university attendance as other well-documented correlates such as sex, academic performance and parental education. Finally, higher university attendance rates are observed when students learn earlier (rather than later), that a university degree is required for their intended job.

    Release date: 2009-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200900410931
    Description:

    Based on information available from the 2006 General Social Survey on families, this article will explore the nature of time children spend with their separated or divorced parents. Issues to be explored will include: the type of visitation/access arrangements; the length of time spent with each parent; whether the time involves leisure activities, regular care (school, daycare, social) and decision-making activities; and whether parents are satisfied with the arrangements they have for visitation/access.

    Release date: 2009-10-28

  • Journals and periodicals: 89-599-M
    Description:

    This research paper series addresses many topics related to children and youth in Canada, including: cognitive, physical and emotional development; health; behaviour; relationships with others; experiences in the home, at school and at work; family change; and transitions to adulthood. The main data source for the papers in this series is the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth.

    Release date: 2009-09-25

  • Articles and reports: 89-599-M2009006
    Description:

    This study used data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) to provide a picture of Canadian 9-year-old children at the transition between the primary grades and the junior grades in school. The children varied widely in their academic achievement, and some of these variations were linked to their gender, their family income level, and their province of residence. Marked differences were also found in the education environments of children, linked most consistently to family income levels. These education environments were not linked to academic success as measured by mathematics achievement at school. Academic achievement at age 9 was significantly related to school readiness four years earlier.

    Release date: 2009-09-25

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2009017
    Description:

    This study examined the influence of school, neighbourhood and student characteristics on the likelihood of students committing violent delinquency. Based on data from the International Youth Survey (2006), findings indicated that there was significant variation in violent delinquency across Toronto schools. In part, this variation was explained by the school climate, or the perceived atmosphere in the school. In particular, a higher level of school capital (positive feeling toward the school) reduced students' chances of committing violent behaviour over and above any of their own risk factors. In contrast, the findings did not support the contention that the level of crime and/or socioeconomic disadvantage in the neighbourhoods surrounding schools had an influence on students' violent behaviour.

    Release date: 2009-09-15

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200900310922
    Description:

    Tens of thousands of students, from kindergarten to college and university, have gone back to school. In honour of this annual ritual, this issue of Education Matters presents a few facts and figures relating to education, from enrolment trends to mobility of apprenticeship completers and barriers to training access, and more.

    Release date: 2009-09-08

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2009075
    Description:

    The analysis for this report is based on data from the Youth in Transition Survey (YITS). The survey was designed by Human Resources and Social Development Canada and Statistics Canada. YITS is a longitudinal survey, which collects information on educational and labour market pathways of a sample of young Canadians in the 18 to 20 age group in 1999. Respondents were asked to provide a range of information on their education and employment experiences as well as information on their personal characteristics. They were interviewed four times since the implementation of the survey, in 2000, 2002, 2004 and 2006. In this report, the data used are from the five cycles and describe where they stood in their school to work pathway in December 2007 when they were 26 to 28 years of age.

    Release date: 2009-07-09

  • Articles and reports: 89-637-X2009005
    Description:

    A series of supporting data tables accompanies the Métis analytical article from the 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS). These tables provide data at the provincial/regional level for the Métis identity population (aged 15 and older) for some of the major themes covered in the analytical article, including: self rated health status; percentage diagnosed with arthritis/rheumatism, high blood pressure, stomach problems or intestinal ulcers, asthma and diabetes; having a regular family doctor; not receiving health care when needed and; reasons for not completing elementary or secondary school. For Métis children aged 6 to 14, tables include: self-rated health status; frequency of participation in sports and; contact with a pediatrician, general practitioner or family physician in the past 12 months.

    Release date: 2009-03-26

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200900110783
    Description:

    The Internet is a virtual world filled with an abundance of information and endless sources of entertainment. While an extraordinary tool, the Internet comes with risks. For children these risks include the dangers of sexual exploitation, such as luring through the Internet.

    Presently, there is little data available on child luring. The information that does exist represents only those incidents that have been reported to the police. Therefore, it is difficult to quantify the full extent and nature of child luring offences in Canada. Nonetheless, using the first available police-reported data on child luring, this Juristat article presents a snapshot of the characteristics of this relatively new criminal offence and the people accused of committing it, as well as an examination of court cases and decisions for child luring offences.

    Release date: 2009-03-12

  • Articles and reports: 81-004-X200800510799
    Description:

    This article explores the prevalence of, and factors related to, delinquency as reported by a sample of youth in grades 7, 8 and 9 living in Toronto in 2006. Previous work has found that demographic characteristics, school commitment, experiences of victimization and relationships with peers and families are all related to delinquent behaviour among youth. This article investigates these factors in order to determine the extent to which they can help explain the delinquency experiences of immigrant and non-immigrant youth. The analysis is based on data from The International Youth Survey which was conducted by Statistics Canada in 2006 as part of the 2006 International Self-Reported Delinquency Study in which over 30 countries participated.

    Release date: 2009-03-04

  • Articles and reports: 89-637-X2009002
    Description:

    A series of supporting data tables accompanies the First Nations analytical article from the 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS). These supporting data tables provide data at the provincial/regional level for off-reserve First Nations children aged 6 to 14 for major themes covered in the analytical article: school achievement; parental satisfaction toward school practices; getting along with teachers; learning disability; frequency of reading books; and frequency of playing sports.

    Release date: 2009-02-19

  • Articles and reports: 89-637-X2009004
    Description:

    This report explores some initial findings regarding the health and well-being of Métis adults (aged 15 and over) and children (aged 6 to 14) from the 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey. Information on self-rated health, physical activity level, and opinions on how Métis can improve their health are provided. Important indicators of health such as chronic conditions and healthcare utilization, and some key social determinants of health are also examined. Some comparisons are made over time (between 2001 and 2006), revealing areas of improvement and decline. In addition, some comparisons are made between Métis men and women from urban and rural areas and from different age groups. Finally, where possible, comparisons are made between Métis and the total Canadian population.

    Release date: 2009-02-19

  • Articles and reports: 89-637-X2009006
    Description:

    This is one of three fact sheets in the series using information from the 2006 Aboriginal Peoples Survey (APS) and 2006 Census. This fact sheet provides information on the health and well-being of Métis adults (aged 15 and over) and children (aged 6 to 14).

    Release date: 2009-02-19

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