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All (23)

All (23) (23 of 23 results)

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201700154844
    Description:

    This Juristat article examines the characteristics and outcomes of cases in adult criminal courts for selected offences that were subject to changes in mandatory minimum penalties legislation enacted from 2005 to 2012. Specifically, the analysis looks at sentencing for offences occurring before and after the introduction or amendment of mandatory minimum penalties, using data from the Integrated Criminal Court Survey. In particular, the report focusses on cases where the most serious offence involved selected sexual violations against children, child pornography, or selected firearms-related offences.

    Release date: 2017-08-29

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201700114777
    Description:

    This Juristat article examines trends in police resources for Canada, the provinces and territories, and select police services. The number of police officers per 100,000 population (rate of police strength) is presented for each of the national, provincial/territorial, and for select police services. Additionally, other police personnel statistics, including gender, hirings, departures, and eligibility to retire of police officers, and data on expenditures on policing (a component of justice system spending) are presented for the national and provincial/territorial levels. Finally, selected personnel data are presented at the national level, including rank, age group, and years of service of police officers, as well as the number of civilians.

    Release date: 2017-03-29

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201600114668
    Description:

    This annual Juristat article presents 2015 homicide data. Short and long-term trends in homicide are examined at the national, provincial/territorial and census metropolitan area levels. Gang-related homicides, firearm-related homicides, intimate partner homicides, and homicides committed by youth are also explored. This Juristat also presents a special analysis of the circumstances surrounding homicides of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal females committed by 'casual acquaintances' from 1980 to 2015.

    Release date: 2016-11-23

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201600114642
    Description:

    This annual Juristat article presents findings from the 2015 Uniform Crime Reporting Survey. It examines trends in the volume and seriousness of police-reported crime for both violent and non-violent offences at the national, provincial/territorial and census metropolitan area levels. Specific violations, such as homicide, sexual assault, and breaking and entering are examined, as well as trends in youth accused of crime.

    Release date: 2016-07-20

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201600114561
    Description:

    This Juristat article uses police-reported data from the Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey to examine the nature of crime committed by young adults, and how it compares to crime among youth and older adults. It also examines changes in rates of offending as young people develop from adolescence to young adulthood and transition through their 20s.

    Release date: 2016-05-10

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201600114309
    Description:

    This Juristat article uses data from the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey to examine youth crime reported by police in 2014. In addition, the report uses data from the Integrated Criminal Courts Survey to chart trends in court processing of youth from 2000 to 2014.

    Release date: 2016-02-17

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201500114224
    Description:

    This Juristat examines the number and types of cases completed in youth courts on an annual basis. Characteristics of youth accused, case decisions, types of sentences imposed and case completion times are also explored. Data are presented at both the national and provincial/territorial levels.

    Release date: 2015-09-28

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201500114191
    Description:

    This Juristat article examines the nature and extent of police-reported hate crime in Canada. Key topics include motivations for hate crime (e.g. race/ethnicity, religion, and sexual orientation), types of offences, geographical comparisons and accused/victim characteristics. The article uses data from the Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey which gathers data from police records.

    Release date: 2015-06-09

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201500114165
    Description:

    This Juristat uses data from the Uniform Crime Reporting survey (UCR) to examine the nature and extent of police-reported crime in northern regions of the provinces and the territories, as compared to crime in the south. The analysis will focus on types of crime, level of seriousness and who are the perpetrators and victims in these different regions.

    Release date: 2015-05-05

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201400113005
    Description:

    This Juristat article examines family law cases in the civil courts. It provides a focused look at the amount of court activity they involve, and how they progress over time. The report is based on data from the eight Canadian provinces and territories reporting to the Civil Court Survey.

    Release date: 2014-04-28

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201400111899
    Description:

    This report is based on data from the 2011/2012 Victim Services Survey and provides a profile of victim service agencies in Canada that responded to the survey, as well as information on the clients they served. In reference to 2011/2012, the report presents data on the types of agencies in Canada, the services offered, staff and volunteers, and criminal injuries compensation applications and awards. Characteristics of clients, such as sex, age grouping and type of victimization, are based on counts of clients served on a snapshot day of May 24, 2012. The 2011/2012 Victim Services Survey was conducted by the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics and was funded by Justice Canada's Policy Centre for Victim Issues. Victim service agencies surveyed include system-based, police-based and court-based agencies, sexual assault centres, other selected community-based agencies, and criminal injuries compensation and other financial benefit programs for victims of crime. It should be noted that data on transition homes and shelters for abused women and their children are collected through Statistics Canada's Transition Home Survey.

    Release date: 2014-02-13

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201300111822
    Description:

    This Juristat article examines the nature and extent of police-reported hate crime in Canada. Key topics include motivations for hate crime (e.g. race/ethnicity, religion, and sexual orientation), types of offences, geographical comparisons and accused/victim characteristics. The article uses data from the Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey which gathers data from police records.

    Release date: 2013-07-11

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201300111781
    Description:

    This Juristat article examines the characteristics of civil court family law cases related to child protection, custody, access and child support. It examines family and child cases in the overall context of the civil court systems. It then provides a more focused look at the different child issues, their complexity, the amount of court activity they involve, and how they tend to progress over time. The report is based on data from the eight provinces and territories included in the Civil Court Survey.

    Release date: 2013-04-29

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200800110509
    Description:

    Using administrative data, this Juristat is intended to provide a profile of female offenders in Canada. Police-reported data are used to present information on the nature and extent of crime among female youth and adults in 2005 and then examine trends in the rate of female youth and adults charged by police with violent and property offences from 1986 to 2005. Data are compared with crime rates among male youth and adults to illustrate differences in levels and patterns of offending. The report also examines the processing of female youth and adults through the courts and provides characteristics of adult females under federal and provincial/territorial corrections. Again, comparisons are drawn with court activity involving males and with adults males under correctional services.

    Release date: 2008-01-24

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20070019575
    Description:

    In 2004, as part of its General Social Survey program, Statistics Canada conducted a survey on victimization and public perceptions of crime and the justice system. For the 2004 survey, interviews were conducted by telephone with approximately 24,000 people, aged 15 and older, living in the 10 provinces. Respondents were asked about their experiences with criminal victimization. Those respondents who had been victims of a crime in the previous 12 months were asked for detailed information on each incident, including describing any physical injury sustained, financial losses incurred, emotional/psychological after-effects and/or interruption of daily activities. This Juristat explores how victims are affected by their victimization focusing on the different after-effects associated with violent and non-violent crime as well as by the sex of the victim. The report also details the impact of being a victim of crime on perceptions of personal safety and confidence in the judicial system.

    Release date: 2007-03-01

  • Table: 85-224-X20050008649
    Description:

    Persons over the age of 65 represented 13% of the Canadian population compared to 11% in. It is projected that persons age 65 years and over will represent 15% of the population of Canada. Concern for the well-being of seniors is heightened by the fact that this segment of the population is growing faster than any other age cohort. There are numerous implications for Canadian society as a result of this growth including meeting the health needs of an aging population as well as ensuring that seniors are not victims of violent crime either from within or outside of the family.

    Release date: 2005-07-14

  • Table: 85-224-X20050008647
    Description:

    This chapter examines homicide-suicide trends involving three populations; spouses, children and youth under the age of 18 and older adults (65 years of age and older). The following analysis use data from the Homicide Survey explores the Homicide narratives to add contextual information.

    Release date: 2005-07-14

  • Table: 85-224-X20050008645
    Description:

    In the past decade, four large-scale victimization surveys have been conducted to obtain national population estimates of stalking. These surveys have been carried out in the United Kingdom, the United States, Australia and Canada. For the first time in Statistics Canada measured stalking through the General Social Survey on Victimization (GSS). The present analysis details the prevalence of stalking in Canada, describing victim characteristics, victim'offender relationships, types of stalking experienced, violent stalking relationships, help-seeking behaviour of stalking victims, emotional consequences of stalking, reasons for reporting or not reporting the stalking to the police, types of charges laid against stalkers, and the use and breach of restraining orders.

    Release date: 2005-07-14

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20050018064
    Description:

    This issue of Juristat presents statistical information on the extent and nature of violent victimization of children and youth in Canada in 2003 as reported to a subset of police services. Rates of victimization are presented for each age and sex. Data describes the different types of assaults perpetrated against children and youth, the weapons used to inflict injury, the injuries sustained and the location and time of the assault relative to various age groups. Other topics included in the report are child pornography, sexual exploitation of children, kidnapping and abduction of children. Data used in this report include police statistics from the Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey, the Homicide Survey and court data from the Adult Criminal Court Survey.

    Release date: 2005-04-20

  • Table: 85-224-X20030006541
    Description:

    This chapter focusses on the nature and extent of spousal violence and on the police response to incidents reported to them.

    Release date: 2003-06-23

  • Table: 85-224-X20030006542
    Description:

    This chapter focusses on violence and homicides committed against older adults by family members as reported to police forces across Canada in 2001. In addition, trends over time are examined.

    Release date: 2003-06-23

  • Table: 85-224-X20030006545
    Description:

    This chapter highlights initiatives in place in four jurisdictions (Ontario, Winnipeg, Calgary and the Yukon) to develop specialized domestic violence court programs. It also outlines activities by the Correctional Service of Canada that identify offenders at risk of family violence and provide treatment programs for them.

    Release date: 2003-06-23

  • Table: 85-224-X20030006543
    Description:

    This chapter focusses on physical and sexual assaults and homicides committed against children and youth (under the age of 18) and reported to police forces across the country. In addition, system responses to the problem of child maltreatment are examined.

    Release date: 2003-06-23

Data (7)

Data (7) (7 of 7 results)

  • Table: 85-224-X20050008649
    Description:

    Persons over the age of 65 represented 13% of the Canadian population compared to 11% in. It is projected that persons age 65 years and over will represent 15% of the population of Canada. Concern for the well-being of seniors is heightened by the fact that this segment of the population is growing faster than any other age cohort. There are numerous implications for Canadian society as a result of this growth including meeting the health needs of an aging population as well as ensuring that seniors are not victims of violent crime either from within or outside of the family.

    Release date: 2005-07-14

  • Table: 85-224-X20050008647
    Description:

    This chapter examines homicide-suicide trends involving three populations; spouses, children and youth under the age of 18 and older adults (65 years of age and older). The following analysis use data from the Homicide Survey explores the Homicide narratives to add contextual information.

    Release date: 2005-07-14

  • Table: 85-224-X20050008645
    Description:

    In the past decade, four large-scale victimization surveys have been conducted to obtain national population estimates of stalking. These surveys have been carried out in the United Kingdom, the United States, Australia and Canada. For the first time in Statistics Canada measured stalking through the General Social Survey on Victimization (GSS). The present analysis details the prevalence of stalking in Canada, describing victim characteristics, victim'offender relationships, types of stalking experienced, violent stalking relationships, help-seeking behaviour of stalking victims, emotional consequences of stalking, reasons for reporting or not reporting the stalking to the police, types of charges laid against stalkers, and the use and breach of restraining orders.

    Release date: 2005-07-14

  • Table: 85-224-X20030006541
    Description:

    This chapter focusses on the nature and extent of spousal violence and on the police response to incidents reported to them.

    Release date: 2003-06-23

  • Table: 85-224-X20030006542
    Description:

    This chapter focusses on violence and homicides committed against older adults by family members as reported to police forces across Canada in 2001. In addition, trends over time are examined.

    Release date: 2003-06-23

  • Table: 85-224-X20030006545
    Description:

    This chapter highlights initiatives in place in four jurisdictions (Ontario, Winnipeg, Calgary and the Yukon) to develop specialized domestic violence court programs. It also outlines activities by the Correctional Service of Canada that identify offenders at risk of family violence and provide treatment programs for them.

    Release date: 2003-06-23

  • Table: 85-224-X20030006543
    Description:

    This chapter focusses on physical and sexual assaults and homicides committed against children and youth (under the age of 18) and reported to police forces across the country. In addition, system responses to the problem of child maltreatment are examined.

    Release date: 2003-06-23

Analysis (16)

Analysis (16) (16 of 16 results)

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201700154844
    Description:

    This Juristat article examines the characteristics and outcomes of cases in adult criminal courts for selected offences that were subject to changes in mandatory minimum penalties legislation enacted from 2005 to 2012. Specifically, the analysis looks at sentencing for offences occurring before and after the introduction or amendment of mandatory minimum penalties, using data from the Integrated Criminal Court Survey. In particular, the report focusses on cases where the most serious offence involved selected sexual violations against children, child pornography, or selected firearms-related offences.

    Release date: 2017-08-29

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201700114777
    Description:

    This Juristat article examines trends in police resources for Canada, the provinces and territories, and select police services. The number of police officers per 100,000 population (rate of police strength) is presented for each of the national, provincial/territorial, and for select police services. Additionally, other police personnel statistics, including gender, hirings, departures, and eligibility to retire of police officers, and data on expenditures on policing (a component of justice system spending) are presented for the national and provincial/territorial levels. Finally, selected personnel data are presented at the national level, including rank, age group, and years of service of police officers, as well as the number of civilians.

    Release date: 2017-03-29

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201600114668
    Description:

    This annual Juristat article presents 2015 homicide data. Short and long-term trends in homicide are examined at the national, provincial/territorial and census metropolitan area levels. Gang-related homicides, firearm-related homicides, intimate partner homicides, and homicides committed by youth are also explored. This Juristat also presents a special analysis of the circumstances surrounding homicides of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal females committed by 'casual acquaintances' from 1980 to 2015.

    Release date: 2016-11-23

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201600114642
    Description:

    This annual Juristat article presents findings from the 2015 Uniform Crime Reporting Survey. It examines trends in the volume and seriousness of police-reported crime for both violent and non-violent offences at the national, provincial/territorial and census metropolitan area levels. Specific violations, such as homicide, sexual assault, and breaking and entering are examined, as well as trends in youth accused of crime.

    Release date: 2016-07-20

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201600114561
    Description:

    This Juristat article uses police-reported data from the Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey to examine the nature of crime committed by young adults, and how it compares to crime among youth and older adults. It also examines changes in rates of offending as young people develop from adolescence to young adulthood and transition through their 20s.

    Release date: 2016-05-10

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201600114309
    Description:

    This Juristat article uses data from the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey to examine youth crime reported by police in 2014. In addition, the report uses data from the Integrated Criminal Courts Survey to chart trends in court processing of youth from 2000 to 2014.

    Release date: 2016-02-17

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201500114224
    Description:

    This Juristat examines the number and types of cases completed in youth courts on an annual basis. Characteristics of youth accused, case decisions, types of sentences imposed and case completion times are also explored. Data are presented at both the national and provincial/territorial levels.

    Release date: 2015-09-28

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201500114191
    Description:

    This Juristat article examines the nature and extent of police-reported hate crime in Canada. Key topics include motivations for hate crime (e.g. race/ethnicity, religion, and sexual orientation), types of offences, geographical comparisons and accused/victim characteristics. The article uses data from the Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey which gathers data from police records.

    Release date: 2015-06-09

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201500114165
    Description:

    This Juristat uses data from the Uniform Crime Reporting survey (UCR) to examine the nature and extent of police-reported crime in northern regions of the provinces and the territories, as compared to crime in the south. The analysis will focus on types of crime, level of seriousness and who are the perpetrators and victims in these different regions.

    Release date: 2015-05-05

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201400113005
    Description:

    This Juristat article examines family law cases in the civil courts. It provides a focused look at the amount of court activity they involve, and how they progress over time. The report is based on data from the eight Canadian provinces and territories reporting to the Civil Court Survey.

    Release date: 2014-04-28

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201400111899
    Description:

    This report is based on data from the 2011/2012 Victim Services Survey and provides a profile of victim service agencies in Canada that responded to the survey, as well as information on the clients they served. In reference to 2011/2012, the report presents data on the types of agencies in Canada, the services offered, staff and volunteers, and criminal injuries compensation applications and awards. Characteristics of clients, such as sex, age grouping and type of victimization, are based on counts of clients served on a snapshot day of May 24, 2012. The 2011/2012 Victim Services Survey was conducted by the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics and was funded by Justice Canada's Policy Centre for Victim Issues. Victim service agencies surveyed include system-based, police-based and court-based agencies, sexual assault centres, other selected community-based agencies, and criminal injuries compensation and other financial benefit programs for victims of crime. It should be noted that data on transition homes and shelters for abused women and their children are collected through Statistics Canada's Transition Home Survey.

    Release date: 2014-02-13

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201300111822
    Description:

    This Juristat article examines the nature and extent of police-reported hate crime in Canada. Key topics include motivations for hate crime (e.g. race/ethnicity, religion, and sexual orientation), types of offences, geographical comparisons and accused/victim characteristics. The article uses data from the Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey which gathers data from police records.

    Release date: 2013-07-11

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201300111781
    Description:

    This Juristat article examines the characteristics of civil court family law cases related to child protection, custody, access and child support. It examines family and child cases in the overall context of the civil court systems. It then provides a more focused look at the different child issues, their complexity, the amount of court activity they involve, and how they tend to progress over time. The report is based on data from the eight provinces and territories included in the Civil Court Survey.

    Release date: 2013-04-29

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200800110509
    Description:

    Using administrative data, this Juristat is intended to provide a profile of female offenders in Canada. Police-reported data are used to present information on the nature and extent of crime among female youth and adults in 2005 and then examine trends in the rate of female youth and adults charged by police with violent and property offences from 1986 to 2005. Data are compared with crime rates among male youth and adults to illustrate differences in levels and patterns of offending. The report also examines the processing of female youth and adults through the courts and provides characteristics of adult females under federal and provincial/territorial corrections. Again, comparisons are drawn with court activity involving males and with adults males under correctional services.

    Release date: 2008-01-24

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20070019575
    Description:

    In 2004, as part of its General Social Survey program, Statistics Canada conducted a survey on victimization and public perceptions of crime and the justice system. For the 2004 survey, interviews were conducted by telephone with approximately 24,000 people, aged 15 and older, living in the 10 provinces. Respondents were asked about their experiences with criminal victimization. Those respondents who had been victims of a crime in the previous 12 months were asked for detailed information on each incident, including describing any physical injury sustained, financial losses incurred, emotional/psychological after-effects and/or interruption of daily activities. This Juristat explores how victims are affected by their victimization focusing on the different after-effects associated with violent and non-violent crime as well as by the sex of the victim. The report also details the impact of being a victim of crime on perceptions of personal safety and confidence in the judicial system.

    Release date: 2007-03-01

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20050018064
    Description:

    This issue of Juristat presents statistical information on the extent and nature of violent victimization of children and youth in Canada in 2003 as reported to a subset of police services. Rates of victimization are presented for each age and sex. Data describes the different types of assaults perpetrated against children and youth, the weapons used to inflict injury, the injuries sustained and the location and time of the assault relative to various age groups. Other topics included in the report are child pornography, sexual exploitation of children, kidnapping and abduction of children. Data used in this report include police statistics from the Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey, the Homicide Survey and court data from the Adult Criminal Court Survey.

    Release date: 2005-04-20

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