Statistics by subject – Crime and justice

Filter results by

Help for filters and search
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Type of information

2 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Content

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Filter results by

Help for filters and search
Currently selected filters that can be removed

Keyword(s)

Type of information

2 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Content

1 facets displayed. 0 facets selected.

Other available resources to support your research.

Help for sorting results
Browse our central repository of key standard concepts, definitions, data sources and methods.
Loading
Loading in progress, please wait...
All (22)

All (22) (22 of 22 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201700154869
    Description:

    This study uses self-reported data from the 2014 General Social Survey (GSS) on Victimization to examine trends in and characteristics of childhood physical abuse over time. Respondents are grouped into one of three birth cohorts: (1) 1940 to 1959; (2) 1960 to 1979; or (3) 1980 to 1999. For each cohort, this article also explores the relationship to the person responsible for the most serious incident of abuse during childhood as well as the probability that it was disclosed to someone. This article also examines the association between childhood physical abuse and various indicators of social integration and trust, health and victimization during young adulthood.

    Release date: 2017-09-20

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114785
    Description:

    This chapter of Women in Canada explores the criminal victimization of women and girls as well as their involvement in the criminal justice system as offenders. It covers the types of criminal victimization experienced by females over time; where possible, highlighting important differences in violent crime by Aboriginal identity, immigrant status, visible minority status and age. The use of formal and informal support services is explored, including changes over time in the use of police services. This chapter also reports trends in the number and types of crimes committed by females, along with their involvement in the criminal courts and correctional systems.

    Release date: 2017-06-06

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114693
    Description:

    Based on data from the 2014 General Social Survey, this article examines the characteristics associated with being a victim of cyberbullying or cyberstalking within the last five years for the population aged 15 to 29. This article also examines the association between cyberbullying and cyberstalking and various indicators of trust, personal behaviour and mental health.

    Release date: 2016-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201500114207
    Description:

    The information presented in this article refers to two distinct time periods. First, data pertaining to the characteristics of facilities, the number of annual admissions, and the types of services offered were collected in 2014 and are based upon a 12-month period that preceded the survey. Second, information on the women being served in shelters was collected on a specific "snapshot date" (April 16, 2014).

    Release date: 2015-07-06

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201500114146
    Description:

    This article examines trends in police resources for Canada, the provinces and territories, and census metropolitan areas (CMAs). The number of police officers per 100,000 population (rate of police strength) is presented for each of the national, provincial/territorial, and CMA levels. Additionally, other police personnel statistics, including gender, hirings, departures, and eligibility to retire of police officers, and data on expenditures on policing (a component of justice system spending) are presented for the national and provincial/territorial levels. Finally, selected personnel data are presented at the national level, including rank, age group, and years of service of police officers, as well as the number of civilians.

    Release date: 2015-03-30

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201400111914
    Description:

    This article examines trends in police personnel (including selected demographic characteristics) and expenditures on policing (a component of justice system spending) for Canada, the provinces and territories, and census metropolitan areas. Information on officers per population is presented for each of the national, provincial, and census metropolitan area levels. Additionally, other statistics, including hirings and departures, eligibility to retire, and expenditures are presented for the provincial and national levels. Finally, selected personnel data are presented at the national level, including rank, gender, age group, and years of service of police officers.

    The information contained in this report provides an overview of the Canadian policing community and how it continues to change over time. Findings are primarily based on data from the Police Administration Survey. To provide a more complete picture of the state of policing in Canada, the following contextual information are included: policing responsibilities and strategies within the economics of policing discussions; international data on police personnel and gender from the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), and wage information from Statistics Canada's Labour Force Survey (LFS).

    Release date: 2014-03-27

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201200111647
    Description:

    This report presents information on trends in crimes solved by police at the national, provincial/territorial and police service levels. It includes a comparison of clearance rates for selected violent and non-violent crimes, such as homicide, robbery, sexual assault, break-ins and motor vehicle theft. The report also examines options that police have for clearing incidents, including the laying of formal charges or by other means such as alternative measures for youth.

    Release date: 2012-06-07

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201200111614
    Description:

    Using data from the 2009 General Social Survey (GSS), this Juristat article presents information on the victimization experiences of those aged 15 years and over living in the territories. It examines the nature and extent of criminal victimization in the territories, as well as the socio-demographic and economic characteristics of those who have been victimized. This Juristat article also presents information on reporting victimizations to police, the use of victims' services and the perceptions of personal safety and the criminal justice system among residents of the territories.

    Release date: 2012-01-26

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201100111561
    Description:

    This annual report is an examination of homicide in Canada. Detailed information is presented on the characteristics of homicide incidents (murder, manslaughter and infanticide), victims and accused within the context of both short and long-term trends. Geographical patterns of homicide are examined at the national and provincial/territorial levels, as well as for major metropolitan areas. Other key themes include gang-related homicides, firearm-related homicides, youth homicides and intimate partner homicides. The data are intended to respond to the needs of those who work in the criminal justice system as well as to inform researchers, policy analysts, academics, the media and the public on the nature and extent of homicide in Canada.

    Release date: 2011-10-26

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111416
    Description:

    The chapter entitled Women and the criminal justice system explores the prevalence and nature of female victimization, female criminality, as well as the processing of female offenders through the criminal justice system in Canada. Specifically, the types of offences perpetrated against females and by females are examined, as are trends over time in police-reported incidents, completed court cases and admissions to provincial and federal correctional services. Trends involving female youth and female adult offenders are explored separately.

    Release date: 2011-04-01

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201000211242
    Description:

    In 2008, among incidents perpetrated by intimate partners, one quarter of all violent incidents reported to police and one third of homicides involved individuals in dating relationships. Illustrating the importance of exploring violence in all types of intimate relationships, this report examines the prevalence and characteristics of incidents of police-reported dating violence in Canada. For comparison purposes, the population of interest includes individuals aged 15 and older, consistent with previous analyses of police-reported spousal violence in Canada. Results suggest that the characteristics of police-reported dating violence have largely mirrored those of spousal violence, with some notable exceptions. Incidents of dating violence in same-sex relationships and those involving younger victims between the ages of 12 and 14 are also explored in this report.

    Release date: 2010-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201000111147
    Description:

    This Juristat article provides an overview of caseload and characteristics of young persons aged 12 to 17 years admitted to and released from correctional services in 2008/2009, and includes a focused analysis of Aboriginal youth in corrections. The article uses data from the Youth Custody and Community Services (YCCS) Survey and the Integrated Correctional Services Survey (ICSS) to analyze trends in admissions to and releases from sentenced custody, remand (pre-trial detention) and probation. These data are examined based on key case characteristics such as age, sex, most serious offence and length of time served. Focused analysis of Aboriginal youth includes comparisons with non-Aboriginal youth in the following areas: incarceration rates as of Census Day 2006 for jurisdictions that provided detailed data (i.e., Newfoundland and Labrador and New Brunswick combined, Ontario and Alberta); length of time spent in custody and offence types.

    Release date: 2010-04-27

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20040018424
    Description:

    This issue of Juristat describes changes in drug offences and impaired driving in Canada. It provides a broad examination of the relationships between drug and alcohol use, and crime. Trends in drug offences reported by police are examined, as well as conviction and sentencing data for adult and youth court cases relating to drug possession and trafficking. It also summarizes offence trends in impaired driving. Finally, the report looks at the role of drug and/or alcohol consumption during the commission of spousal assault and other violent offences.

    Release date: 2004-02-23

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20020108429
    Description:

    The Adult Correctional Services Survey (ACSS) collects annual aggregate data from all jurisdictions on the delivery of adult correctional services from both the provincial, territorial and federal correctional systems. Key themes include the average daily counts of adults in custodial facilities, including remand, as well as monthly counts of probationers; and new admissions (commencements) to correctional programs of sentenced custody, probation, conditional sentences and other community-based programs. The survey also captures information on conditional releases to the community, including parole and statutory release. In addition, the survey collects information on the financial and human resources involved in the delivery of adult correctional services. While trends are presented for the key units of count, the reference period for this release is 2000-2001.

    Release date: 2002-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010128398
    Description:

    This Juristat presents and analyzes information on young offender admissions to custody and community services, with breakdowns by custody (secure custody, open custody, remand) and probation, and key case characteristics such as age, sex, Aboriginal/non-Aboriginal status, and most serious offence. In addition, it includes data pertaining to releases from remand, secure custody, and open custody by sex and time served. These breakdowns are presented and analyzed at the national and provincial/territorial level.

    Data summarized in this Juristat are primarily drawn from the national Youth Custody and Community Services (YCCS) Survey. The scope of the survey is to collect and analyze information on the application of dispositions under the Young Offenders Act from provincial and territorial agencies responsible for youth corrections and programs.

    Release date: 2001-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 85-553-X19990015809
    Description:

    The primary purpose of this chapter is to examine the factors associated with the risk of household victimization. First though, trends in household crime as well as the impact of household crime will be discussed.

    Release date: 2001-08-08

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010078393
    Description:

    Research studies have found a connection between spousal violence and separation, particularly for women. Using data from the 1999 General Social Survey, the 1993 Violence Against Women Survey, the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey and the Homicide Survey, this Juristat investigates the prevalence, nature and severity of violence that occurs following the breakdown of a marital union.

    Release date: 2001-06-28

  • Table: 85-224-X20010006462
    Description:

    The 1999 General Social Survey was the first attempt by Statistics Canada to measure spousal violence in a comprehensive way on a traditional victimization survey. Both women and men were asked a module of 10 questions concerning violence by their current or previous spouses and common-law partners. The nature of the violence under study ranged in severity from threats to sexual assault, and it concerned acts that happened in the 12-month and 5-year periods preceding the survey interview.

    Release date: 2001-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20000118384
    Description:

    This Juristat outlines the characteristics of criminal harassment incidents as well as the characteristics of the accused and victim for 1999, and identifies trends over the past five years. (Trend data are only available for the five-year period from 1995 to 1999.) This Juristat updates a similar Juristat written in 1996 using information collected from police forces and adult criminal courts to review the charges laid and sentences imposed for cases involving criminal harassment.

    There are many different types of stalkers. However, most victims of criminal harassment know their accused quite well and, in many instances, the stalker and victim were involved in a previous relationship.

    Release date: 2000-11-29

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990014577
    Description:

    This article looks at the factors that increase the chances of youth becoming involved in crime.

    Release date: 1999-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19990028297
    Description:

    This series of reports provides detailed statistics and analysis on a variety of topics and issues concerning Canada's justice system. Annual Juristats are produced on areas such as: crime, homicide, youth and adult courts, and corrections. Additional Juristats are also produced each year on current topics of interest to the justice community. This is a unique periodical, of great interest to those who have to plan, establish, administer and evaluate justice programs and projects, or anyone who has an interest in Canada's justice system.

    Release date: 1999-03-25

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19970108167
    Description:

    Providing effective treatment and rehabilitation of young offenders and ensuring the safety of Canadian communities are primary objectives of the youth justice system. Increasingly, this system has felt the pressure of public and media scrutiny. The recent parliamentary review and the media have focused on the most serious criminal events involving youths. The Youth Court Survey, through the collection and dissemination of youth court information, assists policy-makers and program managers as they struggle to redefine the nature of Canada's youth justice system. The Youth Court Survey provides data to monitor the current practice of the courts to deal with youths, aged 12 to 17 at the time of the offence, in the criminal justice system. This Juristat provides information on the nature and volume of cases processed by the youth courts of Canada, on accused characteristics, and on case outcomes during the 1995-96 fiscal year (April to March). National caseload trends are also included.

    Release date: 1997-10-30

Data (1)

Data (1) (1 result)

  • Table: 85-224-X20010006462
    Description:

    The 1999 General Social Survey was the first attempt by Statistics Canada to measure spousal violence in a comprehensive way on a traditional victimization survey. Both women and men were asked a module of 10 questions concerning violence by their current or previous spouses and common-law partners. The nature of the violence under study ranged in severity from threats to sexual assault, and it concerned acts that happened in the 12-month and 5-year periods preceding the survey interview.

    Release date: 2001-06-28

Analysis (21)

Analysis (21) (21 of 21 results)

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201700154869
    Description:

    This study uses self-reported data from the 2014 General Social Survey (GSS) on Victimization to examine trends in and characteristics of childhood physical abuse over time. Respondents are grouped into one of three birth cohorts: (1) 1940 to 1959; (2) 1960 to 1979; or (3) 1980 to 1999. For each cohort, this article also explores the relationship to the person responsible for the most serious incident of abuse during childhood as well as the probability that it was disclosed to someone. This article also examines the association between childhood physical abuse and various indicators of social integration and trust, health and victimization during young adulthood.

    Release date: 2017-09-20

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114785
    Description:

    This chapter of Women in Canada explores the criminal victimization of women and girls as well as their involvement in the criminal justice system as offenders. It covers the types of criminal victimization experienced by females over time; where possible, highlighting important differences in violent crime by Aboriginal identity, immigrant status, visible minority status and age. The use of formal and informal support services is explored, including changes over time in the use of police services. This chapter also reports trends in the number and types of crimes committed by females, along with their involvement in the criminal courts and correctional systems.

    Release date: 2017-06-06

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201600114693
    Description:

    Based on data from the 2014 General Social Survey, this article examines the characteristics associated with being a victim of cyberbullying or cyberstalking within the last five years for the population aged 15 to 29. This article also examines the association between cyberbullying and cyberstalking and various indicators of trust, personal behaviour and mental health.

    Release date: 2016-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201500114207
    Description:

    The information presented in this article refers to two distinct time periods. First, data pertaining to the characteristics of facilities, the number of annual admissions, and the types of services offered were collected in 2014 and are based upon a 12-month period that preceded the survey. Second, information on the women being served in shelters was collected on a specific "snapshot date" (April 16, 2014).

    Release date: 2015-07-06

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201500114146
    Description:

    This article examines trends in police resources for Canada, the provinces and territories, and census metropolitan areas (CMAs). The number of police officers per 100,000 population (rate of police strength) is presented for each of the national, provincial/territorial, and CMA levels. Additionally, other police personnel statistics, including gender, hirings, departures, and eligibility to retire of police officers, and data on expenditures on policing (a component of justice system spending) are presented for the national and provincial/territorial levels. Finally, selected personnel data are presented at the national level, including rank, age group, and years of service of police officers, as well as the number of civilians.

    Release date: 2015-03-30

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201400111914
    Description:

    This article examines trends in police personnel (including selected demographic characteristics) and expenditures on policing (a component of justice system spending) for Canada, the provinces and territories, and census metropolitan areas. Information on officers per population is presented for each of the national, provincial, and census metropolitan area levels. Additionally, other statistics, including hirings and departures, eligibility to retire, and expenditures are presented for the provincial and national levels. Finally, selected personnel data are presented at the national level, including rank, gender, age group, and years of service of police officers.

    The information contained in this report provides an overview of the Canadian policing community and how it continues to change over time. Findings are primarily based on data from the Police Administration Survey. To provide a more complete picture of the state of policing in Canada, the following contextual information are included: policing responsibilities and strategies within the economics of policing discussions; international data on police personnel and gender from the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), and wage information from Statistics Canada's Labour Force Survey (LFS).

    Release date: 2014-03-27

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201200111647
    Description:

    This report presents information on trends in crimes solved by police at the national, provincial/territorial and police service levels. It includes a comparison of clearance rates for selected violent and non-violent crimes, such as homicide, robbery, sexual assault, break-ins and motor vehicle theft. The report also examines options that police have for clearing incidents, including the laying of formal charges or by other means such as alternative measures for youth.

    Release date: 2012-06-07

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201200111614
    Description:

    Using data from the 2009 General Social Survey (GSS), this Juristat article presents information on the victimization experiences of those aged 15 years and over living in the territories. It examines the nature and extent of criminal victimization in the territories, as well as the socio-demographic and economic characteristics of those who have been victimized. This Juristat article also presents information on reporting victimizations to police, the use of victims' services and the perceptions of personal safety and the criminal justice system among residents of the territories.

    Release date: 2012-01-26

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201100111561
    Description:

    This annual report is an examination of homicide in Canada. Detailed information is presented on the characteristics of homicide incidents (murder, manslaughter and infanticide), victims and accused within the context of both short and long-term trends. Geographical patterns of homicide are examined at the national and provincial/territorial levels, as well as for major metropolitan areas. Other key themes include gang-related homicides, firearm-related homicides, youth homicides and intimate partner homicides. The data are intended to respond to the needs of those who work in the criminal justice system as well as to inform researchers, policy analysts, academics, the media and the public on the nature and extent of homicide in Canada.

    Release date: 2011-10-26

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201000111416
    Description:

    The chapter entitled Women and the criminal justice system explores the prevalence and nature of female victimization, female criminality, as well as the processing of female offenders through the criminal justice system in Canada. Specifically, the types of offences perpetrated against females and by females are examined, as are trends over time in police-reported incidents, completed court cases and admissions to provincial and federal correctional services. Trends involving female youth and female adult offenders are explored separately.

    Release date: 2011-04-01

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201000211242
    Description:

    In 2008, among incidents perpetrated by intimate partners, one quarter of all violent incidents reported to police and one third of homicides involved individuals in dating relationships. Illustrating the importance of exploring violence in all types of intimate relationships, this report examines the prevalence and characteristics of incidents of police-reported dating violence in Canada. For comparison purposes, the population of interest includes individuals aged 15 and older, consistent with previous analyses of police-reported spousal violence in Canada. Results suggest that the characteristics of police-reported dating violence have largely mirrored those of spousal violence, with some notable exceptions. Incidents of dating violence in same-sex relationships and those involving younger victims between the ages of 12 and 14 are also explored in this report.

    Release date: 2010-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201000111147
    Description:

    This Juristat article provides an overview of caseload and characteristics of young persons aged 12 to 17 years admitted to and released from correctional services in 2008/2009, and includes a focused analysis of Aboriginal youth in corrections. The article uses data from the Youth Custody and Community Services (YCCS) Survey and the Integrated Correctional Services Survey (ICSS) to analyze trends in admissions to and releases from sentenced custody, remand (pre-trial detention) and probation. These data are examined based on key case characteristics such as age, sex, most serious offence and length of time served. Focused analysis of Aboriginal youth includes comparisons with non-Aboriginal youth in the following areas: incarceration rates as of Census Day 2006 for jurisdictions that provided detailed data (i.e., Newfoundland and Labrador and New Brunswick combined, Ontario and Alberta); length of time spent in custody and offence types.

    Release date: 2010-04-27

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20040018424
    Description:

    This issue of Juristat describes changes in drug offences and impaired driving in Canada. It provides a broad examination of the relationships between drug and alcohol use, and crime. Trends in drug offences reported by police are examined, as well as conviction and sentencing data for adult and youth court cases relating to drug possession and trafficking. It also summarizes offence trends in impaired driving. Finally, the report looks at the role of drug and/or alcohol consumption during the commission of spousal assault and other violent offences.

    Release date: 2004-02-23

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20020108429
    Description:

    The Adult Correctional Services Survey (ACSS) collects annual aggregate data from all jurisdictions on the delivery of adult correctional services from both the provincial, territorial and federal correctional systems. Key themes include the average daily counts of adults in custodial facilities, including remand, as well as monthly counts of probationers; and new admissions (commencements) to correctional programs of sentenced custody, probation, conditional sentences and other community-based programs. The survey also captures information on conditional releases to the community, including parole and statutory release. In addition, the survey collects information on the financial and human resources involved in the delivery of adult correctional services. While trends are presented for the key units of count, the reference period for this release is 2000-2001.

    Release date: 2002-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010128398
    Description:

    This Juristat presents and analyzes information on young offender admissions to custody and community services, with breakdowns by custody (secure custody, open custody, remand) and probation, and key case characteristics such as age, sex, Aboriginal/non-Aboriginal status, and most serious offence. In addition, it includes data pertaining to releases from remand, secure custody, and open custody by sex and time served. These breakdowns are presented and analyzed at the national and provincial/territorial level.

    Data summarized in this Juristat are primarily drawn from the national Youth Custody and Community Services (YCCS) Survey. The scope of the survey is to collect and analyze information on the application of dispositions under the Young Offenders Act from provincial and territorial agencies responsible for youth corrections and programs.

    Release date: 2001-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 85-553-X19990015809
    Description:

    The primary purpose of this chapter is to examine the factors associated with the risk of household victimization. First though, trends in household crime as well as the impact of household crime will be discussed.

    Release date: 2001-08-08

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010078393
    Description:

    Research studies have found a connection between spousal violence and separation, particularly for women. Using data from the 1999 General Social Survey, the 1993 Violence Against Women Survey, the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey and the Homicide Survey, this Juristat investigates the prevalence, nature and severity of violence that occurs following the breakdown of a marital union.

    Release date: 2001-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20000118384
    Description:

    This Juristat outlines the characteristics of criminal harassment incidents as well as the characteristics of the accused and victim for 1999, and identifies trends over the past five years. (Trend data are only available for the five-year period from 1995 to 1999.) This Juristat updates a similar Juristat written in 1996 using information collected from police forces and adult criminal courts to review the charges laid and sentences imposed for cases involving criminal harassment.

    There are many different types of stalkers. However, most victims of criminal harassment know their accused quite well and, in many instances, the stalker and victim were involved in a previous relationship.

    Release date: 2000-11-29

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990014577
    Description:

    This article looks at the factors that increase the chances of youth becoming involved in crime.

    Release date: 1999-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19990028297
    Description:

    This series of reports provides detailed statistics and analysis on a variety of topics and issues concerning Canada's justice system. Annual Juristats are produced on areas such as: crime, homicide, youth and adult courts, and corrections. Additional Juristats are also produced each year on current topics of interest to the justice community. This is a unique periodical, of great interest to those who have to plan, establish, administer and evaluate justice programs and projects, or anyone who has an interest in Canada's justice system.

    Release date: 1999-03-25

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19970108167
    Description:

    Providing effective treatment and rehabilitation of young offenders and ensuring the safety of Canadian communities are primary objectives of the youth justice system. Increasingly, this system has felt the pressure of public and media scrutiny. The recent parliamentary review and the media have focused on the most serious criminal events involving youths. The Youth Court Survey, through the collection and dissemination of youth court information, assists policy-makers and program managers as they struggle to redefine the nature of Canada's youth justice system. The Youth Court Survey provides data to monitor the current practice of the courts to deal with youths, aged 12 to 17 at the time of the offence, in the criminal justice system. This Juristat provides information on the nature and volume of cases processed by the youth courts of Canada, on accused characteristics, and on case outcomes during the 1995-96 fiscal year (April to March). National caseload trends are also included.

    Release date: 1997-10-30

Reference (0)

Reference (0) (0 results)

Your search for "" found no results in this section of the site.

You may try:

Browse our partners page to find a complete list of our partners and their associated products.

Date modified: