Statistics by subject – Crime and justice

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All (9)

All (9) (9 of 9 results)

  • Technical products: 85-569-X
    Description:

    This feasibility report provides a blueprint for improving data on fraud in Canada through a survey of businesses and through amendments to the Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Survey. Presently, national information on fraud is based on official crime statistics reported by police services to the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey. These data, however, do not reflect the true nature and extent of fraud in Canada due to under-reporting of fraud by individuals and businesses, and due to inconsistencies in the way frauds are counted within the UCR Survey. This feasibility report concludes that a better measurement of fraud in Canada could be obtained through a survey of businesses. The report presents the information priorities of government departments, law enforcement and the private sector with respect to the issue of fraud and makes recommendations on how a survey of businesses could help fulfill these information needs.

    To respond to information priorities, the study recommends surveying the following types of business establishments: banks, payment companies (i.e. credit card and debit card companies), selected retailers, property and casualty insurance carriers, health and disability insurance carriers and selected manufacturers. The report makes recommendations regarding survey methodology and questionnaire content, and provides estimates for timeframes and cost.

    The report also recommends changes to the UCR Survey in order to improve the way in which incidents are counted and to render the data collected more relevant with respect to the information priorities raised by government, law enforcement and the private sector during the feasibility study.

    Release date: 2006-04-11

  • Technical products: 85-564-X
    Description:

    This objective of this report is to present the status of national data on Aboriginal people who come into contact with the criminal justice system as offenders and victims. The report examines the current and potential collection of an individual's Aboriginal identity through various justice-related surveys at Statistics Canada, the challenges within these surveys to collect these data and provides some insight into the quality of these data. The data and sources are examined within the context of information needs for the justice and social policy sectors, and in relation to the preferred method of measuring Aboriginal Identity at Statistics Canada. Data sources examined include the Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey, the Homicide Survey, the Integrated Criminal Courts Survey, the Adult Corrections Survey, the Youth Custody and Community Services Survey, the Youth Alternative Measures Survey, the Transition Home Survey, the Victim Services Survey and the General Social Survey on Victimization. Finally, the report briefly describes efforts by other countries to improve justice-related information on their indigenous populations.

    Release date: 2005-05-10

  • Technical products: 85-562-X
    Description:

    Restorative justice processes are rapidly being adopted within Canada, as well as internationally, as a way of responding to crime and victimization. There is, however, little information quantifying the use of restorative justice programs and services in criminal matters in Canada. In order to address this information gap, the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics was asked to undertake a special study of restorative justice programs and services.

    This report summarizes the results of consultations with stakeholders and addresses survey definitions, scope, methodology and other related issues required prior to conducting a study on restorative justice programs and services in criminal matters in Canada. The current report also presents an overview of restorative justice philosophy and concepts, and it provides recommendations for conducting a study.

    Release date: 2003-12-11

  • Technical products: 85-557-X
    Description:

    In January 1999, the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics (CCJS) received a commitment of four years funding from the federal government's Policy Research Initiative (PRI) to conduct a study on hate crime in Canada. The purpose of the overall study is to enhance our understanding of hate crime and to assess the feasibility of collecting police-reported hate crime statistics in Canada. In 2001, the CCJS released a report entitled "Hate crime in Canada: an overview of issues and data sources", catalogue no. 85-551-XIE.

    This report helped to address some questions regarding the nature and magnitude of hate crimes in Canada, although certain data gaps were identified. As a result, it was determined that a pilot survey should be conducted with police departments that collect hate crime statistics. In order to determine specific information needs for the pilot survey, consultations were held with a number of academics; members of various non-governmental and community organizations; and federal and provincial departments responsible for the administration of justice, as well as police departments.

    The information contained in this report provides a summary of the consultations that were held between September 2001 and March 2002.

    Release date: 2002-10-28

  • Technical products: 85-556-X
    Description:

    Recognizing that there is the need for better information and statistics on organized crime, and for methodologies to measure its impact on Canadians, the federal, provincial and territorial ministers responsible for Justice have endorsed a plan to begin addressing Canada's data gap in the area of organized crime.

    The Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics was contracted by the Solicitor General of Canada to investigate the feasibility of collecting quantitative data on organized crime. This report highlights the lessons learned during consultations with selected police intelligence units and it presents a number of options for data collection.

    Release date: 2002-09-27

  • Technical products: 85-552-X
    Description:

    This report presents a description of the organization and operation of provincial and territorial maintenance enforcement programs. It describes the relevant provincial legislation, highlights latest developments, provides a general description of each program, describes how each manages cases, intake/withdrawal procedures, tracing, monitoring, payment processing and enforcement practices. As such, the reader will be able to identify the variations and similarities between the various programs. All of the maintenance enforcement programs rely upon several federal acts to collect, trace and enforce support payments. Therefore, a review of the relevant federal legislation is presented first, followed by a description of each provincial and territorial maintenance enforcement program.

    Release date: 2002-08-01

  • Technical products: 85F0035X
    Description:

    A comparison of crime rates between Canada and the United States is often sought by the media, researchers, and policy makers. Recognizing this demand, along with the methodological complexities, the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics has undertaken the task of assessing the feasibility of comparing police reported statistics between these two countries. This report compares and contrasts the specific offence definitions, classification, and scoring rules of the Canadian and American Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) surveys. Offences are organized according to the type of survey (aggregate versus incident based) and level of analysis (incident level and accused level). Where applicable, the discussion notes modifications that could allow for reliable cross-national comparisons. The report also briefly discusses the potential of comparing detailed offence characteristics.

    Release date: 2001-07-03

  • Technical products: 85-602-X
    Description:

    The purpose of this report is to provide an overview of existing methods and techniques making use of personal identifiers to support record linkage. Record linkage can be loosely defined as a methodology for manipulating and / or transforming personal identifiers from individual data records from one or more operational databases and subsequently attempting to match these personal identifiers to create a composite record about an individual. Record linkage is not intended to uniquely identify individuals for operational purposes; however, it does provide probabilistic matches of varying degrees of reliability for use in statistical reporting. Techniques employed in record linkage may also be of use for investigative purposes to help narrow the field of search against existing databases when some form of personal identification information exists.

    Release date: 2000-12-05

  • Technical products: 85-547-X
    Description:

    This document is an examination of the present use of two case management tools in the Canadian civil courts: time limits and formal notification requirements. Time limits refer to the established time periods outlined for the conclusion of critical steps in the litigation process. These address individual case movement in the court system. Formal notification requirements relate to an obligation by the parties to notify the court when an action has terminated. These requirements serve to inform overall case disposition irrespective of any target disposition dates that may be in effect.

    The current study examines the situation in Canadian provinces and territories with respect to the existence and observance of time limits and formal notification requirements. This examination is timely because a number of jurisdictions are presently engaged in building or modifying automated case management systems. As well, many jurisdictions are re-examining case management in an attempt to increase the speed of case processing and lessen backlog in the courts.

    Release date: 1999-08-20

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Reference (9)

Reference (9) (9 of 9 results)

  • Technical products: 85-569-X
    Description:

    This feasibility report provides a blueprint for improving data on fraud in Canada through a survey of businesses and through amendments to the Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Survey. Presently, national information on fraud is based on official crime statistics reported by police services to the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey. These data, however, do not reflect the true nature and extent of fraud in Canada due to under-reporting of fraud by individuals and businesses, and due to inconsistencies in the way frauds are counted within the UCR Survey. This feasibility report concludes that a better measurement of fraud in Canada could be obtained through a survey of businesses. The report presents the information priorities of government departments, law enforcement and the private sector with respect to the issue of fraud and makes recommendations on how a survey of businesses could help fulfill these information needs.

    To respond to information priorities, the study recommends surveying the following types of business establishments: banks, payment companies (i.e. credit card and debit card companies), selected retailers, property and casualty insurance carriers, health and disability insurance carriers and selected manufacturers. The report makes recommendations regarding survey methodology and questionnaire content, and provides estimates for timeframes and cost.

    The report also recommends changes to the UCR Survey in order to improve the way in which incidents are counted and to render the data collected more relevant with respect to the information priorities raised by government, law enforcement and the private sector during the feasibility study.

    Release date: 2006-04-11

  • Technical products: 85-564-X
    Description:

    This objective of this report is to present the status of national data on Aboriginal people who come into contact with the criminal justice system as offenders and victims. The report examines the current and potential collection of an individual's Aboriginal identity through various justice-related surveys at Statistics Canada, the challenges within these surveys to collect these data and provides some insight into the quality of these data. The data and sources are examined within the context of information needs for the justice and social policy sectors, and in relation to the preferred method of measuring Aboriginal Identity at Statistics Canada. Data sources examined include the Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey, the Homicide Survey, the Integrated Criminal Courts Survey, the Adult Corrections Survey, the Youth Custody and Community Services Survey, the Youth Alternative Measures Survey, the Transition Home Survey, the Victim Services Survey and the General Social Survey on Victimization. Finally, the report briefly describes efforts by other countries to improve justice-related information on their indigenous populations.

    Release date: 2005-05-10

  • Technical products: 85-562-X
    Description:

    Restorative justice processes are rapidly being adopted within Canada, as well as internationally, as a way of responding to crime and victimization. There is, however, little information quantifying the use of restorative justice programs and services in criminal matters in Canada. In order to address this information gap, the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics was asked to undertake a special study of restorative justice programs and services.

    This report summarizes the results of consultations with stakeholders and addresses survey definitions, scope, methodology and other related issues required prior to conducting a study on restorative justice programs and services in criminal matters in Canada. The current report also presents an overview of restorative justice philosophy and concepts, and it provides recommendations for conducting a study.

    Release date: 2003-12-11

  • Technical products: 85-557-X
    Description:

    In January 1999, the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics (CCJS) received a commitment of four years funding from the federal government's Policy Research Initiative (PRI) to conduct a study on hate crime in Canada. The purpose of the overall study is to enhance our understanding of hate crime and to assess the feasibility of collecting police-reported hate crime statistics in Canada. In 2001, the CCJS released a report entitled "Hate crime in Canada: an overview of issues and data sources", catalogue no. 85-551-XIE.

    This report helped to address some questions regarding the nature and magnitude of hate crimes in Canada, although certain data gaps were identified. As a result, it was determined that a pilot survey should be conducted with police departments that collect hate crime statistics. In order to determine specific information needs for the pilot survey, consultations were held with a number of academics; members of various non-governmental and community organizations; and federal and provincial departments responsible for the administration of justice, as well as police departments.

    The information contained in this report provides a summary of the consultations that were held between September 2001 and March 2002.

    Release date: 2002-10-28

  • Technical products: 85-556-X
    Description:

    Recognizing that there is the need for better information and statistics on organized crime, and for methodologies to measure its impact on Canadians, the federal, provincial and territorial ministers responsible for Justice have endorsed a plan to begin addressing Canada's data gap in the area of organized crime.

    The Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics was contracted by the Solicitor General of Canada to investigate the feasibility of collecting quantitative data on organized crime. This report highlights the lessons learned during consultations with selected police intelligence units and it presents a number of options for data collection.

    Release date: 2002-09-27

  • Technical products: 85-552-X
    Description:

    This report presents a description of the organization and operation of provincial and territorial maintenance enforcement programs. It describes the relevant provincial legislation, highlights latest developments, provides a general description of each program, describes how each manages cases, intake/withdrawal procedures, tracing, monitoring, payment processing and enforcement practices. As such, the reader will be able to identify the variations and similarities between the various programs. All of the maintenance enforcement programs rely upon several federal acts to collect, trace and enforce support payments. Therefore, a review of the relevant federal legislation is presented first, followed by a description of each provincial and territorial maintenance enforcement program.

    Release date: 2002-08-01

  • Technical products: 85F0035X
    Description:

    A comparison of crime rates between Canada and the United States is often sought by the media, researchers, and policy makers. Recognizing this demand, along with the methodological complexities, the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics has undertaken the task of assessing the feasibility of comparing police reported statistics between these two countries. This report compares and contrasts the specific offence definitions, classification, and scoring rules of the Canadian and American Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) surveys. Offences are organized according to the type of survey (aggregate versus incident based) and level of analysis (incident level and accused level). Where applicable, the discussion notes modifications that could allow for reliable cross-national comparisons. The report also briefly discusses the potential of comparing detailed offence characteristics.

    Release date: 2001-07-03

  • Technical products: 85-602-X
    Description:

    The purpose of this report is to provide an overview of existing methods and techniques making use of personal identifiers to support record linkage. Record linkage can be loosely defined as a methodology for manipulating and / or transforming personal identifiers from individual data records from one or more operational databases and subsequently attempting to match these personal identifiers to create a composite record about an individual. Record linkage is not intended to uniquely identify individuals for operational purposes; however, it does provide probabilistic matches of varying degrees of reliability for use in statistical reporting. Techniques employed in record linkage may also be of use for investigative purposes to help narrow the field of search against existing databases when some form of personal identification information exists.

    Release date: 2000-12-05

  • Technical products: 85-547-X
    Description:

    This document is an examination of the present use of two case management tools in the Canadian civil courts: time limits and formal notification requirements. Time limits refer to the established time periods outlined for the conclusion of critical steps in the litigation process. These address individual case movement in the court system. Formal notification requirements relate to an obligation by the parties to notify the court when an action has terminated. These requirements serve to inform overall case disposition irrespective of any target disposition dates that may be in effect.

    The current study examines the situation in Canadian provinces and territories with respect to the existence and observance of time limits and formal notification requirements. This examination is timely because a number of jurisdictions are presently engaged in building or modifying automated case management systems. As well, many jurisdictions are re-examining case management in an attempt to increase the speed of case processing and lessen backlog in the courts.

    Release date: 1999-08-20

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