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  • Table: 85-225-X
    Description:

    This report examines trends in police personnel (including selected demographic characteristics) and expenditures on policing (a component of justice system spending) for Canada, the provinces and territories, census metropolitan areas and municipal police services. Findings are based on data from the Police Administration Survey. Selected data are presented at the national and provincial levels, including rank, gender, age group and years of service of police officers. Other crime and personnel statistics, including officers per population, hirings and departures and Crime Severity Index values are presented for census metropolitan areas and for all municipal police services in Canada. The information contained in this report provides an overview of the Canadian policing community and how it continues to change over time.

    Release date: 2013-03-20

  • Table: 85F0015X
    Description:

    The Legal Aid Survey provides information on revenues, expenditures, personnel, and caseload (e.g., applications for legal aid services) associated with the delivery of legal aid in the 13 provinces and territories in Canada in 2011/2012. Data were collected through a survey questionnaire sent to the 13 legal aid plans in Canada, from provincial and territorial departments responsible for justice matters, and from Justice Canada.

    Release date: 2013-03-07

  • Table: 85-404-X
    Description:

    This set of fact sheets present national, provincial and territorial data on shelters that provide residential services to abused women and their children. The highlighted information includes profiles of the facilities and services provided, as well as characteristics of residents. Data for these fact sheets are from the Transition Home Survey (THS), a biennial census of all facilities in Canada known to provide residential services to abused women and their children. The THS is conducted by the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics as part of the federal government's Family Violence Initiative and collects information on the characteristics of the facilities and the services provided during a 12-month period. Additionally, through the use of a snapshot day survey (mid-April of the collection year), selected characteristics of residents (i.e., reasons for coming to the shelter, relationship to abuser, repeat stays, etc.) are collected.

    Release date: 2011-10-25

  • Public use microdata: 12M0023X
    Description:

    This package was designed to enable users to access and manipulate the microdata file for Cycle 23 (2009) of the General Social Survey (GSS). It contains information on the objectives, methodology and estimation procedures, as well as guidelines for releasing estimates based on the survey.

    Cycle 23 collected data from persons 15 years and over living in private households in Canada, excluding residents of the Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut; and full-time residents of institutions.

    The purpose of this survey is to better understand how Canadians perceive crime and the justice system and their experiences of victimization. The survey is designed to produce estimates of the extent to which persons are the victims of eight types of offences (assault, sexual assault, robbery, theft of personal property, breaking and entering, motor vehicle theft, theft of household property and vandalism); to examine the risk factors associated with victimization; to examine the rates of reporting to the police; and to evaluate the fear of crime and public perceptions of crime and the criminal justice system.

    Cycle 23 is the fifth cycle of the GSS dedicated to collecting data on victimization. Previous cycles had been conducted in 1988, 1993, 1999 and 2004. Cycle 23 includes most of the content from previous cycles as well as new content, added to reflect the society's emerging issues of crime prevention and Internet victimization.

    Release date: 2011-02-10

  • Table: 85-224-X
    Description:

    This is the thirteenth annual Family Violence in Canada: A Statistical Profile report produced by the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics under the Federal Family Violence Initiative. This annual report provides the most current data on the nature and extent of family violence in Canada, as well as trends over time, as part of the ongoing initiative to inform policy makers and the public about family violence issues. Each year the report has a different focus. This year, the focus of the report is on self-reported incidents of spousal victimization from the 2009 General Social Survey on Victimization. In addition, using police-reported data, the report also presents information on family violence against children and youth, family violence against seniors, and family-related homicides. The Family Violence in Canada: A Statistical Profile will now be produced as an article in Juristat, catalogue no. 85-002-X , as such the old product number (85-224-X) associated with the report is now terminated.

    Release date: 2011-01-27

  • Table: Summary table
    Release date: 2006-08-02

  • Table: 85-568-X
    Description:

    In 2004, as part of its General Social Survey program, Statistics Canada conducted a survey on victimization and public perceptions of crime and the justice system. It was the fourth time that the General Social Survey (GSS) had examined victimization - previous surveys were conducted in 1988, 1993, and 1999. The target population was Canadians aged 15 years and older living in the ten provinces.

    This survey also included a test collection of telephone survey data in the Northwest Territories, Nunavut and Yukon. This document contains data tables for these territories produced from the sample of this test collection.

    Release date: 2006-03-10

  • Table: 85-227-X
    Description:

    This report presents indicators to measure the workload and performance of the criminal justice system, as well as indictors on a number of socio-demographic and economic factors that can be associated with crime and victimization. In this report, workload and volume measures centre on the work of the police, courts, corrections, diversion programs and victim services and changes over time. Examples of workload and volume indicators examined in this report include: the number of criminal incidents known to police; the number of people serviced by alternative measures, mediation, dispute resolution and diversion programs; the number of cases dealt with in court; average counts in corrections institutions, and; the number of persons assisted by victim service agencies. Performance indicators are organized according to the following five general goals of the criminal justice system: 1) Public order, safety and national security through prevention and intervention; 2) Offender accountability, reintegration and rehabilitation; 3) Public trust, confidence and respect for the justice system; 4) Social equity and access to the justice system for all citizens, and; 5) Victim needs served. Examples of performance indicators examined in this report are: the overall cost of administering the sectors of the criminal justice system; the type and length of sentences ordered in court; public satisfaction with the police, the courts, and the correctional and parole systems; the number of applications for legal aid, and; the number of services for victims of crime. The various socio-demographic and economic indicators included in this report are presented in order to present statistical information on the factors that can be associated with crime. These 'context of crime indicators are organized into three broad categories: Community and society, Family, and Individual. Examples of such indicators examined in this report are: the age and sex distributions of the population; income levels and labour force participation; levels of social engagement; levels of gang activity; family structures; levels of child support; levels of education; the rate of literacy, and; the rate of alcohol and drug abuse among the adult and youth population.

    Release date: 2005-12-20

  • Public use microdata: 12M0018X
    Description:

    Cycle 18 of the GSS is the fourth cycle (after cycles 3, 8 and 13) to collect information on the nature and extent of criminal victimization in Canada. Content from Cycle 13 on senior abuse and public perception of alternatives to imprisonment was not repeated. New topics of interest were added including stalking, use of restraining orders and social disorder. Other subjects common to all four cycles include perceptions of crime, police and courts; crime prevention precautions; and accident and crime incident reports.

    The target population of the GSS is all individuals aged 15 and over living in a private household in one of the ten provinces.

    Release date: 2005-11-24

  • Table: 85-567-X
    Description:

    Provincial and territorial governments are responsible for the administration of community-based correctional services in Canada for adults and youth, which include, but are not limited to probation, conditional sentences, and temporary absence programs. Although the Criminal Code of Canada, the Young Offenders Act and the Youth Criminal Justice Act set out guidelines, jurisdictions are not obliged to follow them directly. Jurisdictions will differ, sometimes substantially, in their administration.

    This publication provides a descriptive overview of sentences and the delivery of community correctional services across all jurisdictions in Canada for both adult and youth. In addition, this publication reports on community corrections data collected from the special study, as well as data from the Adult Correctional Services Survey, the Key Indicator Report, the Youth Custody and Community Services Survey, and the Alternative Measures Survey. It examines admissions and average counts of adults and youth who were under community supervision, showing trends as far back as 1993/94. Furthermore, data on offender characteristics, such as sex and Aboriginal status are also presented.

    Release date: 2005-09-07

  • Table: 85-224-X20050008644
    Description:

    Recently, through the General Social Survey (GSS) on Victimization, questions related to spousal violence against women and men were repeated. Results of this survey permit the analysis of how spousal violence has changed in nature and extent over the two cycles of the survey from and, for the first time, provide trends on male spousal violence. As will be highlighted in this chapter, the GSS illustrates that overall spousal violence rates have remained stable, but violence in previous relationships has decreased for both women and men and continues to be more common than in current relationships. In addition, the data continue to show that violence is more prevalent in common-law relationships than in marital unions, and although relatively equal proportions of women and men report some type of spousal violence, women continue to suffer more serious and repeated spousal violence than do men and incur more serious consequences as a result of this violence.

    Release date: 2005-07-14

  • Table: 85-224-X20050008647
    Description:

    This chapter examines homicide-suicide trends involving three populations; spouses, children and youth under the age of 18 and older adults (65 years of age and older). The following analysis use data from the Homicide Survey explores the Homicide narratives to add contextual information.

    Release date: 2005-07-14

  • Table: 85-224-X20050008645
    Description:

    In the past decade, four large-scale victimization surveys have been conducted to obtain national population estimates of stalking. These surveys have been carried out in the United Kingdom, the United States, Australia and Canada. For the first time in Statistics Canada measured stalking through the General Social Survey on Victimization (GSS). The present analysis details the prevalence of stalking in Canada, describing victim characteristics, victim'offender relationships, types of stalking experienced, violent stalking relationships, help-seeking behaviour of stalking victims, emotional consequences of stalking, reasons for reporting or not reporting the stalking to the police, types of charges laid against stalkers, and the use and breach of restraining orders.

    Release date: 2005-07-14

  • Table: 85-224-X20050008646
    Description:

    Using data from the Homicide Survey, the following chapter examines the different circumstances and characteristics of family-related homicides in Canada which occurred. The analysis includes details about spousal homicides, child and youth homicides and family homicides of older persons (65+). This chapter will present data on the characteristics of the accused, the incident and the victim in these homicides.

    Release date: 2005-07-14

  • Table: 85-224-X20050008648
    Description:

    This chapter will focus on the physical and sexual assaults against children and youth (under the age of 18) that were reported to police services. In addition, other forms of child maltreatment and child abuse are presented including the extent to which children and youth witness violence in the home. System responses to the issue of child maltreatment and violence will be examined, using information from the Transition Home and Victim Services Surveys. As well, recent policy developments to address and improve the situation of family violence against children and youth in Canada will be highlighted.

    Release date: 2005-07-14

  • Table: 85-224-X20050008649
    Description:

    Persons over the age of 65 represented 13% of the Canadian population compared to 11% in. It is projected that persons age 65 years and over will represent 15% of the population of Canada. Concern for the well-being of seniors is heightened by the fact that this segment of the population is growing faster than any other age cohort. There are numerous implications for Canadian society as a result of this growth including meeting the health needs of an aging population as well as ensuring that seniors are not victims of violent crime either from within or outside of the family.

    Release date: 2005-07-14

  • Table: 85-565-X
    Description:

    In 2004, as part of its General Social Survey program, Statistics Canada conducted a survey on victimization and public perceptions of crime and the justice system. It was the fourth time that the General Social Survey (GSS) had examined victimization - previous surveys were conducted in 1988, 1993, and 1999. The target population was Canadians aged 15 years and older living in the ten provinces.

    This report provides an overview of the main findings from cycle 18 of the General Social Survey on Victimization and makes comparisons with previous survey cycles. The analysis focuses on Canadians' outlook on crime and the criminal justice system, as well as their fear of crime. Variations by province are also presented.

    Release date: 2005-07-07

  • Table: 85-566-X
    Description:

    This report presents an overview of Canadians' outlook on crime and the criminal justice system at both the national and Census Metropolitan Area levels. The information was collected in 2004 through Cycle 18 of the General Social Survey (GSS) on victimization. This survey, which has been previously carried out in 1999, 1993, and 1988, collects information on Canadians' experience of victimization, and public attitudes towards crime, police, courts, prison and parole. The target population of the GSS is all individuals aged 15 and over living in a private household in one of the ten provinces.

    Release date: 2005-07-07

  • Table: 85-205-X
    Description:

    Crime statistics for 2003 were first released in July 2004. Canadian crime statistics, 2003, released today, presents additional detailed information. Standard crime tables are presented for Canada, the provinces and territories, and all census metropolitan areas. Also included in the publication is a set of 20 tables from the Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey, based on data collected from 122 police departments in nine provinces that dealt with 61% of the national volume of police-reported crime. These tables examine the characteristics of the victims and the accused (their age and sex, the relationship of the accused to the victim, level of injury and weapon causing injury), as well as the criminal incident itself (location of the incident, target of violation, presence of weapons and type of property stolen).

    Release date: 2004-10-13

  • Table: 85-224-X20040006982
    Description:

    Societal recognition of the problem of domestic violence has led to an overall shift in the criminal justice system's response to violence in spousal relationships, as well as the implementation of prevention and intervention initiatives at the community level over the past number of decades. Furthermore, research conducted by governments and academics has allowed us to gain a better understanding of the nature and extent of violence, the risk factors associated with spousal violence, and the characteristics of victims and offenders.

    Release date: 2004-07-06

  • Table: 85-224-X20040006985
    Description:

    Using data from the Homicide Survey, this chapter examines the prevalence of and trends in family homicide .It also explores the circumstances surrounding homicides, and the demographic characteristics of accused persons and victims. Finally, information on the aftermath of family homicide will be presented by examining what happened to the accused following the homicide.

    Release date: 2004-07-06

  • Table: 85-224-X20040006986
    Description:

    Until recently, charging and prosecution policies emphasized the need to treat family violence 'like any other crime.' These policies translated into significant challenges for police and prosecutors who became aware of the unique characteristics of family violence such as the sharing of a home and the emotional and financial relationships between the victim and the offender.

    Release date: 2004-07-06

  • Table: 85-224-X20040006983
    Description:

    The definition of child abuse varies among researchers, criminal justice, health and social service professionals. As an example, child abuse is defined differently for criminal law and child protection purposes and, moreover, definitions in the child protection context vary from jurisdiction to jurisdiction.

    Release date: 2004-07-06

  • Table: 85-224-X20040006984
    Description:

    With the aging of Canada's population in recent years, there has been a corresponding shift in how to meet the needs of Canada's older adults. Community-based care has become the preferred method over institutional care for seniors who require assistance, with the majority of the caregiving duties being left to family members and friends

    Release date: 2004-07-06

Analysis (417)

Analysis (417) (25 of 417 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 85-002-X
    Description:

    This publication provides in-depth analysis and detailed statistics on a variety of topics and issues related to justice and public safety. Topics include crime, victimization, homicide, civil, family and criminal courts, and correctional services. Issues related to community safety, and perceptions of safety are also covered. The publication is intended for those with an interest in Canada's justice and public safety systems as well as those who plan, establish, administer and evaluate programs and projects related to justice and public safety.

    Release date: 2017-10-03

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-10-03

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201700154866
    Description:

    This Juristat article presents a statistical profile of sexual assaults reported by police in Canada between 2009 and 2014. A comprehensive analysis of incident, victim and accused characteristics over a six-year period is undertaken to offer a deeper understanding of those who commit sexual assault and those who are victims of it. Factors explored include location of the sexual assault, weapon(s) used, level of physical injury to the victim, as well as the age and sex profiles of accused and victims and the relationship between them. For the first time, new analysis on the delay in reporting to police is presented. Findings are compared with physical assault where appropriate in order to provide an analytical reference point. This Juristat article serves as the baseline profile for a forthcoming study that traces the outcomes of sexual assault cases in the justice system.

    Release date: 2017-10-03

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201700114840
    Description:

    Statistics Canada is presently preparing the statistical system to be able to gauge the impact of the transition from illegal to legal non-medical cannabis use and to shed light on the social and economic activities related to the use of cannabis thereafter. While the system of social statistics captures some information on the use of cannabis, updates will be required to more accurately measure health effects and the impact on the judicial system. Current statistical infrastructure used to more comprehensively measure the use and impacts of substances such as tobacco and alcohol could be adapted to do the same for cannabis. However, available economic statistics are largely silent on the role illegal drugs play in the economy. Both social and economic statistics will need to be updated to reflect the legalization of cannabis and the challenge is especially great for economic statistics This paper provides a summary of the work that is now under way toward these ends.

    Release date: 2017-09-28

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-09-25

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-09-20

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-09-20

  • Articles and reports: 75-006-X201700154869
    Description:

    This study uses self-reported data from the 2014 General Social Survey (GSS) on Victimization to examine trends in and characteristics of childhood physical abuse over time. Respondents are grouped into one of three birth cohorts: (1) 1940 to 1959; (2) 1960 to 1979; or (3) 1980 to 1999. For each cohort, this article also explores the relationship to the person responsible for the most serious incident of abuse during childhood as well as the probability that it was disclosed to someone. This article also examines the association between childhood physical abuse and various indicators of social integration and trust, health and victimization during young adulthood.

    Release date: 2017-09-20

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-08-29

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201700154844
    Description:

    This Juristat article examines the characteristics and outcomes of cases in adult criminal courts for selected offences that were subject to changes in mandatory minimum penalties legislation enacted from 2005 to 2012. Specifically, the analysis looks at sentencing for offences occurring before and after the introduction or amendment of mandatory minimum penalties, using data from the Integrated Criminal Court Survey. In particular, the report focusses on cases where the most serious offence involved selected sexual violations against children, child pornography, or selected firearms-related offences.

    Release date: 2017-08-29

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-07-24

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201700154842
    Description:

    This annual Juristat article presents findings from the 2016 Uniform Crime Reporting Survey. It examines trends in the volume and seriousness of police-reported crime for both violent and non-violent offences at the national, provincial/territorial and census metropolitan area levels. Specific violations, such as homicide, sexual assault, and breaking and entering are examined, as well as trends in youth accused of crime.

    Release date: 2017-07-24

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-07-11

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201700114842
    Description:

    This Juristat article uses self-reported data from the 2014 General Social Survey on Canadians' Safety (Victimization) to present information on sexual assault in Canada, including sexual attacks, unwanted sexual touching and sexual activity where the victim was unable to consent. This article examines the characteristics of sexual assault victims and their perceptions of safety, and the characteristics of sexual assault offenders and incidents. The emotional and physical consequences of sexual assault, in addition to reporting sexual assault to the police and the reasons for not reporting, are also discussed.

    Release date: 2017-07-11

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-06-13

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-06-13

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201700114832
    Description:

    This Juristat article examines the nature and extent of police-reported hate crime in Canada. Key topics include motivations for hate crime (e.g. race/ethnicity, religion, and sexual orientation), types of offences, geographical comparisons and accused/victim characteristics. The article uses data from the Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey which gathers data from police records.

    Release date: 2017-06-13

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-06-06

  • Articles and reports: 89-503-X201500114785
    Description:

    This chapter of Women in Canada explores the criminal victimization of women and girls as well as their involvement in the criminal justice system as offenders. It covers the types of criminal victimization experienced by females over time; where possible, highlighting important differences in violent crime by Aboriginal identity, immigrant status, visible minority status and age. The use of formal and informal support services is explored, including changes over time in the use of police services. This chapter also reports trends in the number and types of crimes committed by females, along with their involvement in the criminal courts and correctional systems.

    Release date: 2017-06-06

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-05-04

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-03-29

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201700114777
    Description:

    This Juristat article examines trends in police resources for Canada, the provinces and territories, and select police services. The number of police officers per 100,000 population (rate of police strength) is presented for each of the national, provincial/territorial, and for select police services. Additionally, other police personnel statistics, including gender, hirings, departures, and eligibility to retire of police officers, and data on expenditures on policing (a component of justice system spending) are presented for the national and provincial/territorial levels. Finally, selected personnel data are presented at the national level, including rank, age group, and years of service of police officers, as well as the number of civilians.

    Release date: 2017-03-29

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-03-01

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-03-01

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201700114702
    Description:

    This Juristat article provides a statistical overview of youth under correctional supervision in Canada in 2015/2016. Analysis is presented at the national as well as the provincial and territorial levels. Average counts, intakes, admissions and the characteristics of youth in the correctional system (such as age, sex and Aboriginal identity) are discussed.

    Release date: 2017-03-01

Reference (43)

Reference (43) (25 of 43 results)

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