Statistics by subject – Crime and justice

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All (28)

All (28) (25 of 28 results)

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19990138307
    Description:

    This report measures the scope of violent crime by female and male youths at the national and provincial levels and in selected metropolitan areas, determines the degree of change observed between 1988 and 1998, identifies the characteristics of violent crime by youths and compares it to that of adults, and creates a portrait of violent young offenders (male and female) and their victims. To this end, police-reported data from the Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Survey have been used.

    Release date: 1999-12-21

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19990128306
    Description:

    This Juristat examines how much is being spent to operate the justice system in Canada and how many people are working in the system. Trends in spending and personnel are discussed for policing, courts, legal aid, criminal prosecutions, and corrections. Data for the report come from several sources, including the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics' resource, expenditure and personnel surveys, Statistics Canada's Financial Management System, and Justice Canada. Depending on the source, the data cover the period up to 1996/97 or 1997/98.

    Release date: 1999-12-13

  • Journals and periodicals: 85-550-X
    Description:

    The Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics has prepared a report on the use of remand in Canada. Remand refers to persons who have been charged with an offence and ordered by the court to custody while awaiting a further court appearance. This report uses data from the Adult Correctional Services (ACS) survey to assess the trends in remand admissions, sentence lengths, and average daily counts of remand inmates in provincial/territorial correctional facilities between 1988-89 and 1997-98. Characteristics of remand inmates (e.g., age, gender, marital status, level of education, employment), offences and criminal history were studied using data from the One-Day Snapshot report (a census of inmates on-register in adult correctional facilities on midnight Saturday October 5th 1996). Characteristics and offences of youth on remand in 1997-98 were also examined using data from the Youth Custody and Community Services (YCCS) survey. Trends in the average counts of youth on remand between 1988-89 and 1997-98 are presented using data from the Corrections Key Indicator Report. Appendices include graphs of admissions and average daily counts for each province and territory.

    Release date: 1999-11-25

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19990118305
    Description:

    The Juristat on impaired driving, released every two years, presents data on the declining trend in impaired driving at the national, provincial and census metropolitan area (CMA) levels, as well as the characteristics of persons charged with this offence. The analysis is based on police-reported statistics as well as data from the courts and corrections sectors. Other data sources include data on fatally-injured drivers, on trends in alcohol consumption, as well as information on pro-active police measures such as trends in check-stops and roadside license suspensions.

    Release date: 1999-11-17

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19990108304
    Description:

    This series of reports provides detailed statistics and analysis on a variety of topics and issues concerning Canada's justice system. Annual Juristats are produced on areas such as: crime, homicide, youth and adult courts, and corrections. Additional Juristats are also produced each year on current topics of interest to the justice community. This is a unique periodical, of great interest to those who have to plan, establish, administer and evaluate justice programs and projects, or anyone who has an interest in Canada's justice system

    Release date: 1999-10-07

  • Technical products: 85-547-X
    Description:

    This document is an examination of the present use of two case management tools in the Canadian civil courts: time limits and formal notification requirements. Time limits refer to the established time periods outlined for the conclusion of critical steps in the litigation process. These address individual case movement in the court system. Formal notification requirements relate to an obligation by the parties to notify the court when an action has terminated. These requirements serve to inform overall case disposition irrespective of any target disposition dates that may be in effect.

    The current study examines the situation in Canadian provinces and territories with respect to the existence and observance of time limits and formal notification requirements. This examination is timely because a number of jurisdictions are presently engaged in building or modifying automated case management systems. As well, many jurisdictions are re-examining case management in an attempt to increase the speed of case processing and lessen backlog in the courts.

    Release date: 1999-08-20

  • Journals and periodicals: 85-549-X
    Description:

    This publication presents data from four special studies conducted in Canadian civil courts by Statistics Canada's Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics.

    Release date: 1999-08-20

  • Table: 11-516-X198300111320
    Description:

    This section on crime and justice contains 328 series, arranged in four main sub-sections: crime and law enforcement, (series Z1-65); court proceedings, (series Z66-172); penal institutions, (series Z173-226); and juvenile delinquency, (series Z227-291). Population statistics are appended to facilitate use of the series, (series Z292-328). These series have been selected and arranged not only to provide usable quantitative information covering the field of criminal justice but also to indicate something of the historical development of justice statistics in Canada over the past century.

    Release date: 1999-07-29

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19990098303
    Description:

    This series of reports provides detailed statistics and analysis on a variety of topics and issues concerning Canada's justice system. Annual Juristats are produced on areas such as: crime, homicide, youth and adult courts, and corrections. Additional Juristats are also produced each year on current topics of interest to the justice community. This is a unique periodical, of great interest to those who have to plan, establish, administer and evaluate justice programs and projects, or anyone who has an interest in Canada's justice system.

    Release date: 1999-07-21

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19990088302
    Description:

    In Canada, diversion is an alternative to the formal court process which is available to persons in conflict with the law. Diversion can take two forms: police discretion or alternative measures. Alternative measures aim to divert persons accused of less serious offences out of the formal justice system. Alternative measures programs provide these persons with the opportunity to avoid the consequences of having a criminal record, while holding them accountable in a manner which is visible to the community. The purpose of this Juristat is to provide descriptive information on policies and procedures, as well as quantitative information on the administration of alternative measures for young persons in Canada.

    Release date: 1999-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19990078301
    Description:

    This series of reports provides detailed statistics and analysis on a variety of topics and issues concerning Canada's justice system. Annual Juristats are produced on areas such as: crime, homicide, youth and adult courts, and corrections. Additional Juristats are also produced each year on current topics of interest to the justice community. This is a unique periodical, of great interest to those who have to plan, establish, administer and evaluate justice programs and projects, or anyone who has an interest in Canada's justice system

    Release date: 1999-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19990068232
    Description:

    This series of reports provides detailed statistics and analysis on a variety of topics and issues concerning Canada's justice system. Annual Juristats are produced on areas such as: crime, homicide, youth and adult courts, and corrections. Additional Juristats are also produced each year on current topics of interest to the justice community. This is a unique periodical, of great interest to those who have to plan, establish, administer and evaluate justice programs and projects, or anyone who has an interest in Canada's justice system

    Release date: 1999-06-11

  • Table: 85-224-X19990005306
    Description:

    In Canada, there are a variety of data sources that can be used to examine the nature and extent of family violence. These fall into two general categories: victimization survey data based on victims' accounts of their experiences of family violence reported to survey interviewers, and those based on incidents reported to the police, hospitals, coroners, chlid welfare or other social agencies.

    Release date: 1999-06-11

  • Table: 85-224-X19990005309
    Description:

    Since the 1980s, abuse of older Canadians has gained the attention of service providers, researchers, lobbyists, as well as policy makers. Abus can include physical, psychological or financial mistreatment of adults over the age of 65 years. A lack of information has made it difficult to quantify and truly understand the nature of the problem.

    Release date: 1999-06-11

  • Table: 85-224-X19990005315
    Description:

    Changes in legislation, policies and programs on the part of both federal and provincial/territorial governments have occurred as part of a response to the problem of family violence. This section highlights a few of the responses by provincial courts, the federal correctional system, the network of transition homes and shelters across the country, as well as recent changes in provincial/territorial legislation.

    Release date: 1999-06-11

  • Table: 85-224-X19990005311
    Description:

    Physical and sexual assaults are among the most pervasive causes of harm and death to children and youth, yet the most difficult to document. Assaults by family members account for a substantial portion of all assaults against children and youth.

    Release date: 1999-06-11

  • Table: 85-224-X19990005303
    Description:

    In 1997, victims of spousal violence represented 17% of all violent offences reported to a sample of 179 police agencies in Canada. Women accounted for a large majority (88%) of all reported spousal violence victims.

    Release date: 1999-06-11

  • Table: 85-224-X19990005313
    Description:

    From 1978 to 1997 there were 12,871 victims of homicide in Canada. Family members were responsible for nearly one-third (31%) of these, another 39% were committed by acquaintances, and 12% by strangers. Throughout the period, women and girls were most likely to be killed by a family member (50%), whereas, men and boys were most likely to be killed by acquaintances (46%).

    Release date: 1999-06-11

  • Table: 85-224-X19990005307
    Description:

    The Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics has been tracking trends in crimes reported to the police since 1962 through the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey.

    Release date: 1999-06-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990014577
    Description:

    This article looks at the factors that increase the chances of youth becoming involved in crime.

    Release date: 1999-06-08

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 85-548-X
    Description:

    This report studies the feasibility of collecting quantitative information on organized criminal activity in Canada, including size and composition of organized crime groups, links between various criminal organizations, and types of illegal activities.

    Release date: 1999-05-20

  • Journals and periodicals: 85-545-X
    Description:

    The report, which represents the first phase of a special study commissioned by the National Justice Statistics Initiative, is intended as a reference document on administrative and operational policies with respect to alternative measures for both youth and adults in Canada. The study focussed on the collection of national descriptive information on the organization and delivery of youth and adult alternative measures established pursuant to the Young Offenders Act (Canada) (1984) and the Sentencing Reform Act (1996).

    Topics covered include the philosophy of the alternative measures, responsibility for program delivery, referral agent, the role of the police, the Crown, and the victim, the right to legal counsel. Eligibility criteria, a flowchart outlining the alternative measures process, a description of the alternative measures agreement, the range of alternative measures, the supervision of and completion of the agreement, and information regarding record keeping requirements. Where available, appendices have been attached that provide samples of forms currently in use in the jurisdiction as well as any currently available alternative measures data. It is important to note that data contained in the jurisdictional appendices are provided as a sample only. No analysis has been performed on the data nor have any inter-jurisdictional comparisons been made as there has been no attempt to ensure standard definition or time frames for the data.

    Release date: 1999-04-27

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19990058300
    Description:

    This Juristat profiles three populations of inmates: women, Aboriginal people and individuals serving life sentences. These data are based on a census of adult inmates on register in all adult correctional facilities as of midnight October 5th, 1996. Data were obtained through administrative records.

    While the general population in Canada was made up almost equally of men and women, women comprised only 5% of prisoners in correctional facilities on October 5, 1996. Female inmates tended to be in their early 30s, single, with grade 9 education or less, and unemployed at the time of admission. They were considered at lower risk to re-offend than men.

    Aboriginal people were over-represented in the prison system. Although they comprised only 2% of the general adult population, they accounted for 17% of the prison population. They were younger on average than non-Aboriginal inmates, had less education and were more likely to have been unemployed. They were also considered at higher risk to re-offend, and they had a higher set of needs than non-Aboriginal inmates (including, substance abuse, employment, personal needs and family/marital needs).

    The data also showed that as of midnight October 5th, 1996, inmates serving a life sentence comprised nearly one-fifth (18%) of the nearly 13,900 inmates in federal prisons. A person can be given a life sentence if they have been convicted of offences such as first degree or second-degree murder. Parole eligibility varies from minimum ten years served to minimum 25 years served.

    Individuals serving life sentences tended to be older and less educated than others in the prison population. The median age for lifers on snapshot day was 39, compared with 33 for other inmates. More than one-half (56%) of lifers had a grade 9 education or less, compared with 44% of other inmates.

    In addition, a majority (84%) of inmates serving life sentences were considered at high risk to re-offend, a much higher proportion than the 53% of other inmates. Not surprisingly, lifers also had a higher set of needs, that is, problem areas requiring intervention, such as personal and emotional issues, marital and family problems, attitude and problems functioning in the community.

    For more information or to enquire about the concepts, methods or data quality of this release, or to order a copy of the Juristat, contact Information and Client Services (613-951-9023 or 1-800-387-2231), Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics.

    Release date: 1999-04-22

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19990048299
    Description:

    This series of reports provides detailed statistics and analysis on a variety of topics and issues concerning Canada's justice system. Annual Juristats are produced on areas such as: crime, homicide, youth and adult courts, and corrections. Additional Juristats are also produced each year on current topics of interest to the justice community. This is a unique periodical, of great interest to those who have to plan, establish, administer and evaluate justice programs and projects, or anyone who has an interest in Canada's justice system.

    Release date: 1999-04-06

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19990038298
    Description:

    This series of reports provides detailed statistics and analysis on a variety of topics and issues concerning Canada's justice system. Annual Juristats are produced on areas such as: crime, homicide, youth and adult courts, and corrections. Additional Juristats are also produced each year on current topics of interest to the justice community. This is a unique periodical, of great interest to those who have to plan, establish, administer and evaluate justice programs and projects, or anyone who has an interest in Canada's justice system.

    Release date: 1999-03-29

Data (8)

Data (8) (8 of 8 results)

  • Table: 11-516-X198300111320
    Description:

    This section on crime and justice contains 328 series, arranged in four main sub-sections: crime and law enforcement, (series Z1-65); court proceedings, (series Z66-172); penal institutions, (series Z173-226); and juvenile delinquency, (series Z227-291). Population statistics are appended to facilitate use of the series, (series Z292-328). These series have been selected and arranged not only to provide usable quantitative information covering the field of criminal justice but also to indicate something of the historical development of justice statistics in Canada over the past century.

    Release date: 1999-07-29

  • Table: 85-224-X19990005306
    Description:

    In Canada, there are a variety of data sources that can be used to examine the nature and extent of family violence. These fall into two general categories: victimization survey data based on victims' accounts of their experiences of family violence reported to survey interviewers, and those based on incidents reported to the police, hospitals, coroners, chlid welfare or other social agencies.

    Release date: 1999-06-11

  • Table: 85-224-X19990005309
    Description:

    Since the 1980s, abuse of older Canadians has gained the attention of service providers, researchers, lobbyists, as well as policy makers. Abus can include physical, psychological or financial mistreatment of adults over the age of 65 years. A lack of information has made it difficult to quantify and truly understand the nature of the problem.

    Release date: 1999-06-11

  • Table: 85-224-X19990005315
    Description:

    Changes in legislation, policies and programs on the part of both federal and provincial/territorial governments have occurred as part of a response to the problem of family violence. This section highlights a few of the responses by provincial courts, the federal correctional system, the network of transition homes and shelters across the country, as well as recent changes in provincial/territorial legislation.

    Release date: 1999-06-11

  • Table: 85-224-X19990005311
    Description:

    Physical and sexual assaults are among the most pervasive causes of harm and death to children and youth, yet the most difficult to document. Assaults by family members account for a substantial portion of all assaults against children and youth.

    Release date: 1999-06-11

  • Table: 85-224-X19990005303
    Description:

    In 1997, victims of spousal violence represented 17% of all violent offences reported to a sample of 179 police agencies in Canada. Women accounted for a large majority (88%) of all reported spousal violence victims.

    Release date: 1999-06-11

  • Table: 85-224-X19990005313
    Description:

    From 1978 to 1997 there were 12,871 victims of homicide in Canada. Family members were responsible for nearly one-third (31%) of these, another 39% were committed by acquaintances, and 12% by strangers. Throughout the period, women and girls were most likely to be killed by a family member (50%), whereas, men and boys were most likely to be killed by acquaintances (46%).

    Release date: 1999-06-11

  • Table: 85-224-X19990005307
    Description:

    The Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics has been tracking trends in crimes reported to the police since 1962 through the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey.

    Release date: 1999-06-11

Analysis (18)

Analysis (18) (18 of 18 results)

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19990138307
    Description:

    This report measures the scope of violent crime by female and male youths at the national and provincial levels and in selected metropolitan areas, determines the degree of change observed between 1988 and 1998, identifies the characteristics of violent crime by youths and compares it to that of adults, and creates a portrait of violent young offenders (male and female) and their victims. To this end, police-reported data from the Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Survey have been used.

    Release date: 1999-12-21

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19990128306
    Description:

    This Juristat examines how much is being spent to operate the justice system in Canada and how many people are working in the system. Trends in spending and personnel are discussed for policing, courts, legal aid, criminal prosecutions, and corrections. Data for the report come from several sources, including the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics' resource, expenditure and personnel surveys, Statistics Canada's Financial Management System, and Justice Canada. Depending on the source, the data cover the period up to 1996/97 or 1997/98.

    Release date: 1999-12-13

  • Journals and periodicals: 85-550-X
    Description:

    The Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics has prepared a report on the use of remand in Canada. Remand refers to persons who have been charged with an offence and ordered by the court to custody while awaiting a further court appearance. This report uses data from the Adult Correctional Services (ACS) survey to assess the trends in remand admissions, sentence lengths, and average daily counts of remand inmates in provincial/territorial correctional facilities between 1988-89 and 1997-98. Characteristics of remand inmates (e.g., age, gender, marital status, level of education, employment), offences and criminal history were studied using data from the One-Day Snapshot report (a census of inmates on-register in adult correctional facilities on midnight Saturday October 5th 1996). Characteristics and offences of youth on remand in 1997-98 were also examined using data from the Youth Custody and Community Services (YCCS) survey. Trends in the average counts of youth on remand between 1988-89 and 1997-98 are presented using data from the Corrections Key Indicator Report. Appendices include graphs of admissions and average daily counts for each province and territory.

    Release date: 1999-11-25

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19990118305
    Description:

    The Juristat on impaired driving, released every two years, presents data on the declining trend in impaired driving at the national, provincial and census metropolitan area (CMA) levels, as well as the characteristics of persons charged with this offence. The analysis is based on police-reported statistics as well as data from the courts and corrections sectors. Other data sources include data on fatally-injured drivers, on trends in alcohol consumption, as well as information on pro-active police measures such as trends in check-stops and roadside license suspensions.

    Release date: 1999-11-17

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19990108304
    Description:

    This series of reports provides detailed statistics and analysis on a variety of topics and issues concerning Canada's justice system. Annual Juristats are produced on areas such as: crime, homicide, youth and adult courts, and corrections. Additional Juristats are also produced each year on current topics of interest to the justice community. This is a unique periodical, of great interest to those who have to plan, establish, administer and evaluate justice programs and projects, or anyone who has an interest in Canada's justice system

    Release date: 1999-10-07

  • Journals and periodicals: 85-549-X
    Description:

    This publication presents data from four special studies conducted in Canadian civil courts by Statistics Canada's Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics.

    Release date: 1999-08-20

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19990098303
    Description:

    This series of reports provides detailed statistics and analysis on a variety of topics and issues concerning Canada's justice system. Annual Juristats are produced on areas such as: crime, homicide, youth and adult courts, and corrections. Additional Juristats are also produced each year on current topics of interest to the justice community. This is a unique periodical, of great interest to those who have to plan, establish, administer and evaluate justice programs and projects, or anyone who has an interest in Canada's justice system.

    Release date: 1999-07-21

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19990088302
    Description:

    In Canada, diversion is an alternative to the formal court process which is available to persons in conflict with the law. Diversion can take two forms: police discretion or alternative measures. Alternative measures aim to divert persons accused of less serious offences out of the formal justice system. Alternative measures programs provide these persons with the opportunity to avoid the consequences of having a criminal record, while holding them accountable in a manner which is visible to the community. The purpose of this Juristat is to provide descriptive information on policies and procedures, as well as quantitative information on the administration of alternative measures for young persons in Canada.

    Release date: 1999-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19990078301
    Description:

    This series of reports provides detailed statistics and analysis on a variety of topics and issues concerning Canada's justice system. Annual Juristats are produced on areas such as: crime, homicide, youth and adult courts, and corrections. Additional Juristats are also produced each year on current topics of interest to the justice community. This is a unique periodical, of great interest to those who have to plan, establish, administer and evaluate justice programs and projects, or anyone who has an interest in Canada's justice system

    Release date: 1999-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19990068232
    Description:

    This series of reports provides detailed statistics and analysis on a variety of topics and issues concerning Canada's justice system. Annual Juristats are produced on areas such as: crime, homicide, youth and adult courts, and corrections. Additional Juristats are also produced each year on current topics of interest to the justice community. This is a unique periodical, of great interest to those who have to plan, establish, administer and evaluate justice programs and projects, or anyone who has an interest in Canada's justice system

    Release date: 1999-06-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X19990014577
    Description:

    This article looks at the factors that increase the chances of youth becoming involved in crime.

    Release date: 1999-06-08

  • Journals and periodicals: 85-545-X
    Description:

    The report, which represents the first phase of a special study commissioned by the National Justice Statistics Initiative, is intended as a reference document on administrative and operational policies with respect to alternative measures for both youth and adults in Canada. The study focussed on the collection of national descriptive information on the organization and delivery of youth and adult alternative measures established pursuant to the Young Offenders Act (Canada) (1984) and the Sentencing Reform Act (1996).

    Topics covered include the philosophy of the alternative measures, responsibility for program delivery, referral agent, the role of the police, the Crown, and the victim, the right to legal counsel. Eligibility criteria, a flowchart outlining the alternative measures process, a description of the alternative measures agreement, the range of alternative measures, the supervision of and completion of the agreement, and information regarding record keeping requirements. Where available, appendices have been attached that provide samples of forms currently in use in the jurisdiction as well as any currently available alternative measures data. It is important to note that data contained in the jurisdictional appendices are provided as a sample only. No analysis has been performed on the data nor have any inter-jurisdictional comparisons been made as there has been no attempt to ensure standard definition or time frames for the data.

    Release date: 1999-04-27

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19990058300
    Description:

    This Juristat profiles three populations of inmates: women, Aboriginal people and individuals serving life sentences. These data are based on a census of adult inmates on register in all adult correctional facilities as of midnight October 5th, 1996. Data were obtained through administrative records.

    While the general population in Canada was made up almost equally of men and women, women comprised only 5% of prisoners in correctional facilities on October 5, 1996. Female inmates tended to be in their early 30s, single, with grade 9 education or less, and unemployed at the time of admission. They were considered at lower risk to re-offend than men.

    Aboriginal people were over-represented in the prison system. Although they comprised only 2% of the general adult population, they accounted for 17% of the prison population. They were younger on average than non-Aboriginal inmates, had less education and were more likely to have been unemployed. They were also considered at higher risk to re-offend, and they had a higher set of needs than non-Aboriginal inmates (including, substance abuse, employment, personal needs and family/marital needs).

    The data also showed that as of midnight October 5th, 1996, inmates serving a life sentence comprised nearly one-fifth (18%) of the nearly 13,900 inmates in federal prisons. A person can be given a life sentence if they have been convicted of offences such as first degree or second-degree murder. Parole eligibility varies from minimum ten years served to minimum 25 years served.

    Individuals serving life sentences tended to be older and less educated than others in the prison population. The median age for lifers on snapshot day was 39, compared with 33 for other inmates. More than one-half (56%) of lifers had a grade 9 education or less, compared with 44% of other inmates.

    In addition, a majority (84%) of inmates serving life sentences were considered at high risk to re-offend, a much higher proportion than the 53% of other inmates. Not surprisingly, lifers also had a higher set of needs, that is, problem areas requiring intervention, such as personal and emotional issues, marital and family problems, attitude and problems functioning in the community.

    For more information or to enquire about the concepts, methods or data quality of this release, or to order a copy of the Juristat, contact Information and Client Services (613-951-9023 or 1-800-387-2231), Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics.

    Release date: 1999-04-22

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19990048299
    Description:

    This series of reports provides detailed statistics and analysis on a variety of topics and issues concerning Canada's justice system. Annual Juristats are produced on areas such as: crime, homicide, youth and adult courts, and corrections. Additional Juristats are also produced each year on current topics of interest to the justice community. This is a unique periodical, of great interest to those who have to plan, establish, administer and evaluate justice programs and projects, or anyone who has an interest in Canada's justice system.

    Release date: 1999-04-06

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19990038298
    Description:

    This series of reports provides detailed statistics and analysis on a variety of topics and issues concerning Canada's justice system. Annual Juristats are produced on areas such as: crime, homicide, youth and adult courts, and corrections. Additional Juristats are also produced each year on current topics of interest to the justice community. This is a unique periodical, of great interest to those who have to plan, establish, administer and evaluate justice programs and projects, or anyone who has an interest in Canada's justice system.

    Release date: 1999-03-29

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19990028297
    Description:

    This series of reports provides detailed statistics and analysis on a variety of topics and issues concerning Canada's justice system. Annual Juristats are produced on areas such as: crime, homicide, youth and adult courts, and corrections. Additional Juristats are also produced each year on current topics of interest to the justice community. This is a unique periodical, of great interest to those who have to plan, establish, administer and evaluate justice programs and projects, or anyone who has an interest in Canada's justice system.

    Release date: 1999-03-25

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X19990018296
    Description:

    This series of reports provides detailed statistics and analysis on a variety of topics and issues concerning Canada's justice system. Annual Juristats are produced on areas such as: crime, homicide, youth and adult courts, and corrections. Additional Juristats are also produced each year on current topics of interest to the justice community. This is a unique periodical, of great interest to those who have to plan, establish, administer and evaluate justice programs and projects, or anyone who has an interest in Canada's justice system.

    Release date: 1999-03-09

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19990014411
    Description:

    Both police officers and private security personnel play a key role in society; however, the line between the two professions is becoming less clearly defined as the use of private security increases. This article discusses the differences between public and private security. It includes information on roles and responsibilities, as well as minimum requirements and training. (Adapted from an article in Juristat published in November 1998.)

    Release date: 1999-03-03

Reference (2)

Reference (2) (2 results)

  • Technical products: 85-547-X
    Description:

    This document is an examination of the present use of two case management tools in the Canadian civil courts: time limits and formal notification requirements. Time limits refer to the established time periods outlined for the conclusion of critical steps in the litigation process. These address individual case movement in the court system. Formal notification requirements relate to an obligation by the parties to notify the court when an action has terminated. These requirements serve to inform overall case disposition irrespective of any target disposition dates that may be in effect.

    The current study examines the situation in Canadian provinces and territories with respect to the existence and observance of time limits and formal notification requirements. This examination is timely because a number of jurisdictions are presently engaged in building or modifying automated case management systems. As well, many jurisdictions are re-examining case management in an attempt to increase the speed of case processing and lessen backlog in the courts.

    Release date: 1999-08-20

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 85-548-X
    Description:

    This report studies the feasibility of collecting quantitative information on organized criminal activity in Canada, including size and composition of organized crime groups, links between various criminal organizations, and types of illegal activities.

    Release date: 1999-05-20

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