Statistics by subject – Crime and justice

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All (42)

All (42) (25 of 42 results)

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010128398
    Description:

    This Juristat presents and analyzes information on young offender admissions to custody and community services, with breakdowns by custody (secure custody, open custody, remand) and probation, and key case characteristics such as age, sex, Aboriginal/non-Aboriginal status, and most serious offence. In addition, it includes data pertaining to releases from remand, secure custody, and open custody by sex and time served. These breakdowns are presented and analyzed at the national and provincial/territorial level.

    Data summarized in this Juristat are primarily drawn from the national Youth Custody and Community Services (YCCS) Survey. The scope of the survey is to collect and analyze information on the application of dispositions under the Young Offenders Act from provincial and territorial agencies responsible for youth corrections and programs.

    Release date: 2001-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010118397
    Description:

    This Juristat examines how Canadian crime rates compare to those in the United States. Using police-reported crime data, the analysis focuses on seven comparable offences: homicide, aggravated assault, robbery, break and enter, motor vehicle theft, theft, and arson. As well, three comparable offences were compared using charge/arrest data, including drug violations, impaired driving, and prostitution. Crime rate comparisons are presented at the national, regional, and metropolitan levels. This is a special topic Juristat of great interest to those working in the criminal justice system, as well as researchers, policy makers, and anyone who is interested in cross-national crime comparisons.

    Release date: 2001-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010108396
    Description:

    This series of reports provides detailed statistics and analysis on a variety of topics and issues concerning Canada's justice system. The Juristat, Sentencing in Adult Criminal Courts, 1999/00, summarizes trends from provincial/territorial courts across Canada, which provided data to the Adult Criminal Court Survey (ACCS). In this Juristat, information is presented on the characteristics of convicted cases, conviction rates, sentencing trends and related issues. As well, statistics are presented for a five-year period (1995/96 through 1999/00).

    Release date: 2001-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010098395
    Description:

    This series of reports provides detailed statistics and analysis on a variety of topics and issues concerning Canada's justice system. Annual Juristats are produced on areas such as: crime, homicide, youth and adult courts, and corrections. Additional Juristats are also produced each year on current topics of interest to the justice community. This is a unique periodical, of great interest to those who have to plan, establish, administer and evaluate justice programs and projects, or anyone who has an interest in Canada's justice system.

    Release date: 2001-10-31

  • Journals and periodicals: 85-553-X
    Description:

    This report provides an in-depth analysis of the findings of the 1999 General Social Survey on victimization and public perceptions of crime and the justice system. The chapters examine the risks of violent and household victimization; urban and rural victimization; victims' use of services; and perceptions and fear of crime.

    Release date: 2001-08-08

  • Table: 85-554-X
    Description:

    This report presents a brief overview of the information collected in Cycle 13 of the General Social Survey (GSS). Cycle 13 is the third cycle (following cycles 3 and 8) that collected information in 1999 on the nature and extent of criminal victimisation in Canada. Focus content for cycle 13 addressed two areas of emerging interest: public perception toward alternatives to imprisonment; and spousal violence and senior abuse. Other subjects common to all three cycles include perceptions of crime, police and courts; crime prevention precautions; accident and crime screening sections; and accident and crime incident reports. The target population of the GSS is all individuals aged 15 and over living in a private household in one of the ten provinces

    Release date: 2001-08-08

  • Articles and reports: 85-553-X19990015808
    Description:

    Using the results of the 1999 General Social Survey (GSS) on Victimization, this chapter examines the characteristics of those who are at greatest risk of violent victimization and the environment in which these incidents occur.

    Release date: 2001-08-08

  • Articles and reports: 85-553-X19990015810
    Description:

    This chapter will assess variations in crime between urban and rural areas as reported by respondents to the 1999 General Social Survey.

    Release date: 2001-08-08

  • Articles and reports: 85-553-X19990015812
    Description:

    Using results from the 1999 GSS, this chapter will examine Canadians' perceptions and fear of crime. In particular, attention is focused on four main area: pervasiveness of fear of crime, factors that can affect fear of crime, and the use of precautionary measures.

    Release date: 2001-08-08

  • Articles and reports: 85-553-X19990015809
    Description:

    The primary purpose of this chapter is to examine the factors associated with the risk of household victimization. First though, trends in household crime as well as the impact of household crime will be discussed.

    Release date: 2001-08-08

  • Articles and reports: 85-553-X19990015811
    Description:

    Using the results of the 1999 GSS on Victimization, this chapter will look at the issue of reporting to police in more detail.

    Release date: 2001-08-08

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010088394
    Description:

    This report is an examination of the annual police-reported crime in Canada. Data are presented within the context of both short and long term trends. The analysis focuses on trends in violent crime, property crime, other Criminal Code offences, impaired driving offences, drug offences and youth crime. Crime rates are examined at the national and provincial/territorial level, as well as for major metropolitan areas. The trend in Canada's crime rate is put into perspective by comparing it with crime trends in some other industrialized countries. This is an annual periodical of great interest to those who work within the criminal justice system or anyone who is interested in crime in Canada.

    Release date: 2001-07-19

  • Technical products: 85F0035X
    Description:

    A comparison of crime rates between Canada and the United States is often sought by the media, researchers, and policy makers. Recognizing this demand, along with the methodological complexities, the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics has undertaken the task of assessing the feasibility of comparing police reported statistics between these two countries. This report compares and contrasts the specific offence definitions, classification, and scoring rules of the Canadian and American Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) surveys. Offences are organized according to the type of survey (aggregate versus incident based) and level of analysis (incident level and accused level). Where applicable, the discussion notes modifications that could allow for reliable cross-national comparisons. The report also briefly discusses the potential of comparing detailed offence characteristics.

    Release date: 2001-07-03

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010078393
    Description:

    Research studies have found a connection between spousal violence and separation, particularly for women. Using data from the 1999 General Social Survey, the 1993 Violence Against Women Survey, the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey and the Homicide Survey, this Juristat investigates the prevalence, nature and severity of violence that occurs following the breakdown of a marital union.

    Release date: 2001-06-28

  • Table: 85-224-X20010006463
    Description:

    One measure taken to assist abused women and their children leaving violent situations has been the development of an ample system of shelters. Shelters offer abused women and their children a temporary and safe place to live. Currently, shelters exist in every province and territory and they provide services to children and female victims of various types of abuse.

    Release date: 2001-06-28

  • Table: 85-224-X20010006459
    Description:

    The Canadian Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect (CIS) is the first national study on the incidence of child abuse and neglect reported to, and investigated by, child welfare services in Canada. Prior to this study, available data had been largely limited to police-reported incidents of assault and homicide. However, because of the secrecy that often surrounds cases of child abuse, many cases never come to the attention of the police.

    Release date: 2001-06-28

  • Table: 85-224-X20010006462
    Description:

    The 1999 General Social Survey was the first attempt by Statistics Canada to measure spousal violence in a comprehensive way on a traditional victimization survey. Both women and men were asked a module of 10 questions concerning violence by their current or previous spouses and common-law partners. The nature of the violence under study ranged in severity from threats to sexual assault, and it concerned acts that happened in the 12-month and 5-year periods preceding the survey interview.

    Release date: 2001-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010068392
    Description:

    This Juristat presents estimates of the number of children in Canada who have witnessed violence in their homes in recent years, and compares the characteristics of these children and their families to children who have not witnessed violence. This analysis also examines links between witnessing violence and behavioural outcomes among children.Estimates of the extent of family violence witnessed by children in Canada are available through three national surveys conducted by Statistics Canada: the 1999 General Social Survey on Victimization, the 1993 Violence Against Women Survey, and the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth. The GSS and the VAWS are victimization surveys that ask a random sample of adults (men and women in the case of the GSS and women only in the case of the VAWS) about their experiences of spousal violence and whether their children witnessed the violence. In the NLSCY, a random sample of children are selected and the person most knowledgeable about the child responds to a wide range of questions about the child and the household, including whether the child sees adults or teenagers in the home physically fighting, hitting or otherwise trying to hurt others.

    Release date: 2001-06-28

  • Table: 85-224-X20010006461
    Description:

    The reactions of children who witness violence by one parent against the other can include emotional, social, cognitive, physical and behavioural maladjustment problems (Jaffe, Wolfe and Wilson 1990). These children tend to show lower levels of social competence; higher rates of depression, worry and frustration; and are more likely than other children to develop stress-related disorders and to show lower levels of empathy (Fantuzzo, et al. 1991; Graham-Bermann and Levendosky 1998; Moore and Pepler 1998; Edleson 1999b).

    Release date: 2001-06-28

  • Table: 85-224-X20010006460
    Description:

    Children and youth are most likely to be killed by family members. Of the 1,990 solved homicides of children and youth recorded by police in Canada between 1974 and 1999, family members were responsible for 63% of the deaths. The remaining solved homicides committed against children and youth were carried out by acquaintances and strangers (27% and 10%, respectively). In contrast, 50% of adults were killed by acquaintances, followed by family members (34%) and strangers (16%). Between 1974 and 1999, the annual rate of homicides of children and youth fluctuated from year to year, ranging from a high of 14 per million in 1981 to the previous low of 8 per million in 1993.

    Release date: 2001-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010058391
    Description:

    The Adult Correctional Services (ACS) survey collects annual aggregate data from all jurisdictions on the delivery of adult correctional services from both the provincial /territorial and federal correctional systems. Key themes include: the average daily counts of adults in custodial facilities, including remand, as well as monthly counts of probationers; and new admissions (commencements) to correctional programs of sentenced custody, probation, conditional sentences and other community-based programs. The survey also captures information on conditional releases to the community including parole and statutory release. In addition, the survey collects information on the financial and human resources involved in the delivery of adult correctional services. While trends are presented for the key units of count, the reference period for this release is 1999-00.

    Release date: 2001-06-26

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2001010
    Description:

    This paper outlines the experience of women in Canada as victims and offenders in the criminal justice system, using a mix of demographic, economic and justice data.

    Release date: 2001-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2001004
    Description:

    This paper outlines the experience of Canadians with low incomes as victims in the criminal justice system, using a mix of demographic, economic and justice data.

    Release date: 2001-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2001001
    Description:

    This paper outlines the experience of Aboriginal people as victims and offenders in the criminal justice system, using a mix of demographic, economic and justice data.

    Release date: 2001-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2001002
    Description:

    This paper outlines the experience of Canadians with disabilities as victims in the criminal justice system, using a mix of demographic, economic and justice data.

    Release date: 2001-06-14

Data (13)

Data (13) (13 of 13 results)

Analysis (27)

Analysis (27) (25 of 27 results)

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010128398
    Description:

    This Juristat presents and analyzes information on young offender admissions to custody and community services, with breakdowns by custody (secure custody, open custody, remand) and probation, and key case characteristics such as age, sex, Aboriginal/non-Aboriginal status, and most serious offence. In addition, it includes data pertaining to releases from remand, secure custody, and open custody by sex and time served. These breakdowns are presented and analyzed at the national and provincial/territorial level.

    Data summarized in this Juristat are primarily drawn from the national Youth Custody and Community Services (YCCS) Survey. The scope of the survey is to collect and analyze information on the application of dispositions under the Young Offenders Act from provincial and territorial agencies responsible for youth corrections and programs.

    Release date: 2001-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010118397
    Description:

    This Juristat examines how Canadian crime rates compare to those in the United States. Using police-reported crime data, the analysis focuses on seven comparable offences: homicide, aggravated assault, robbery, break and enter, motor vehicle theft, theft, and arson. As well, three comparable offences were compared using charge/arrest data, including drug violations, impaired driving, and prostitution. Crime rate comparisons are presented at the national, regional, and metropolitan levels. This is a special topic Juristat of great interest to those working in the criminal justice system, as well as researchers, policy makers, and anyone who is interested in cross-national crime comparisons.

    Release date: 2001-12-18

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010108396
    Description:

    This series of reports provides detailed statistics and analysis on a variety of topics and issues concerning Canada's justice system. The Juristat, Sentencing in Adult Criminal Courts, 1999/00, summarizes trends from provincial/territorial courts across Canada, which provided data to the Adult Criminal Court Survey (ACCS). In this Juristat, information is presented on the characteristics of convicted cases, conviction rates, sentencing trends and related issues. As well, statistics are presented for a five-year period (1995/96 through 1999/00).

    Release date: 2001-12-06

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010098395
    Description:

    This series of reports provides detailed statistics and analysis on a variety of topics and issues concerning Canada's justice system. Annual Juristats are produced on areas such as: crime, homicide, youth and adult courts, and corrections. Additional Juristats are also produced each year on current topics of interest to the justice community. This is a unique periodical, of great interest to those who have to plan, establish, administer and evaluate justice programs and projects, or anyone who has an interest in Canada's justice system.

    Release date: 2001-10-31

  • Journals and periodicals: 85-553-X
    Description:

    This report provides an in-depth analysis of the findings of the 1999 General Social Survey on victimization and public perceptions of crime and the justice system. The chapters examine the risks of violent and household victimization; urban and rural victimization; victims' use of services; and perceptions and fear of crime.

    Release date: 2001-08-08

  • Articles and reports: 85-553-X19990015808
    Description:

    Using the results of the 1999 General Social Survey (GSS) on Victimization, this chapter examines the characteristics of those who are at greatest risk of violent victimization and the environment in which these incidents occur.

    Release date: 2001-08-08

  • Articles and reports: 85-553-X19990015810
    Description:

    This chapter will assess variations in crime between urban and rural areas as reported by respondents to the 1999 General Social Survey.

    Release date: 2001-08-08

  • Articles and reports: 85-553-X19990015812
    Description:

    Using results from the 1999 GSS, this chapter will examine Canadians' perceptions and fear of crime. In particular, attention is focused on four main area: pervasiveness of fear of crime, factors that can affect fear of crime, and the use of precautionary measures.

    Release date: 2001-08-08

  • Articles and reports: 85-553-X19990015809
    Description:

    The primary purpose of this chapter is to examine the factors associated with the risk of household victimization. First though, trends in household crime as well as the impact of household crime will be discussed.

    Release date: 2001-08-08

  • Articles and reports: 85-553-X19990015811
    Description:

    Using the results of the 1999 GSS on Victimization, this chapter will look at the issue of reporting to police in more detail.

    Release date: 2001-08-08

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010088394
    Description:

    This report is an examination of the annual police-reported crime in Canada. Data are presented within the context of both short and long term trends. The analysis focuses on trends in violent crime, property crime, other Criminal Code offences, impaired driving offences, drug offences and youth crime. Crime rates are examined at the national and provincial/territorial level, as well as for major metropolitan areas. The trend in Canada's crime rate is put into perspective by comparing it with crime trends in some other industrialized countries. This is an annual periodical of great interest to those who work within the criminal justice system or anyone who is interested in crime in Canada.

    Release date: 2001-07-19

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010078393
    Description:

    Research studies have found a connection between spousal violence and separation, particularly for women. Using data from the 1999 General Social Survey, the 1993 Violence Against Women Survey, the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey and the Homicide Survey, this Juristat investigates the prevalence, nature and severity of violence that occurs following the breakdown of a marital union.

    Release date: 2001-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010068392
    Description:

    This Juristat presents estimates of the number of children in Canada who have witnessed violence in their homes in recent years, and compares the characteristics of these children and their families to children who have not witnessed violence. This analysis also examines links between witnessing violence and behavioural outcomes among children.Estimates of the extent of family violence witnessed by children in Canada are available through three national surveys conducted by Statistics Canada: the 1999 General Social Survey on Victimization, the 1993 Violence Against Women Survey, and the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth. The GSS and the VAWS are victimization surveys that ask a random sample of adults (men and women in the case of the GSS and women only in the case of the VAWS) about their experiences of spousal violence and whether their children witnessed the violence. In the NLSCY, a random sample of children are selected and the person most knowledgeable about the child responds to a wide range of questions about the child and the household, including whether the child sees adults or teenagers in the home physically fighting, hitting or otherwise trying to hurt others.

    Release date: 2001-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010058391
    Description:

    The Adult Correctional Services (ACS) survey collects annual aggregate data from all jurisdictions on the delivery of adult correctional services from both the provincial /territorial and federal correctional systems. Key themes include: the average daily counts of adults in custodial facilities, including remand, as well as monthly counts of probationers; and new admissions (commencements) to correctional programs of sentenced custody, probation, conditional sentences and other community-based programs. The survey also captures information on conditional releases to the community including parole and statutory release. In addition, the survey collects information on the financial and human resources involved in the delivery of adult correctional services. While trends are presented for the key units of count, the reference period for this release is 1999-00.

    Release date: 2001-06-26

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2001010
    Description:

    This paper outlines the experience of women in Canada as victims and offenders in the criminal justice system, using a mix of demographic, economic and justice data.

    Release date: 2001-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2001004
    Description:

    This paper outlines the experience of Canadians with low incomes as victims in the criminal justice system, using a mix of demographic, economic and justice data.

    Release date: 2001-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2001001
    Description:

    This paper outlines the experience of Aboriginal people as victims and offenders in the criminal justice system, using a mix of demographic, economic and justice data.

    Release date: 2001-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2001002
    Description:

    This paper outlines the experience of Canadians with disabilities as victims in the criminal justice system, using a mix of demographic, economic and justice data.

    Release date: 2001-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2001005
    Description:

    This paper outlines the experience of children and youth in Canada as victims and offenders in the criminal justice system, using a mix of demographic, economic and justice data.

    Release date: 2001-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2001006
    Description:

    This paper outlines the experience of immigrants in Canada as victims in the criminal justice system, using a mix of demographic, economic and justice data.

    Release date: 2001-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2001007
    Description:

    This paper outlines the experience of religious groups in Canada as victims in the criminal justice system, using a mix of demographic, economic and justice data.

    Release date: 2001-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2001008
    Description:

    This paper outlines the experience of seniors in Canada as victims and offenders in the criminal justice system, using a mix of demographic, economic and justice data.

    Release date: 2001-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2001009
    Description:

    This paper outlines the experience of visible minorities in Canada as victims in the criminal justice system, using a mix of demographic, economic and justice data.

    Release date: 2001-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010048390
    Description:

    Using data from the 1994/95 and 1996/97 National Longitudinal Survey on Children and Youth, this Juristat examines problem behaviour and delinquency as reported by a representative sample of youths between 10 and 13 years of age. Specifically four different issues are explored. First, the demographic variation in delinquency is assessed. Second, to understand life-course trajectories of children and youth involved in aggressive behaviour and delinquent acts against property, stability in delinquency is examined. Third, to understand why young people commit offences, it is important to differentiate aggressive behaviour from other types of delinquency. Therefore, the relationship between aggressive behaviour and delinquent acts against property is examined. Finally, the most common risk factors in childhood and early adolescence are presented.

    Release date: 2001-06-12

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20010038389
    Description:

    In 1999/00, 102,000 cases were processed in the youth courts of Canada. This represents a 4% decrease from the previous year and a decrease of 11% from 1992/93. It also represents a 17% decrease in the number of cases per 10,000 youths from 1992/93; since that year, the rate has dropped from 500 cases to 417 cases.

    From 1992/93 to 1999/00, the rate of property crime cases decreased annually, dropping 38% over this period. The rate of violent crime cases has dropped by 3% since 1998/99, yet remains at the same level reported in 1992/93.

    Release date: 2001-05-30

Reference (2)

Reference (2) (2 results)

  • Technical products: 85F0035X
    Description:

    A comparison of crime rates between Canada and the United States is often sought by the media, researchers, and policy makers. Recognizing this demand, along with the methodological complexities, the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics has undertaken the task of assessing the feasibility of comparing police reported statistics between these two countries. This report compares and contrasts the specific offence definitions, classification, and scoring rules of the Canadian and American Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) surveys. Offences are organized according to the type of survey (aggregate versus incident based) and level of analysis (incident level and accused level). Where applicable, the discussion notes modifications that could allow for reliable cross-national comparisons. The report also briefly discusses the potential of comparing detailed offence characteristics.

    Release date: 2001-07-03

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 85-551-X
    Description:

    This report describes some pertinent issues of hate crime: previous findings, international comparisons, recent initiatives, current data sources, and a description of police resources. It also includes findings from the 1999 General Social Survey, which measured self-reported hate crime victimization incidents at the national level.

    Release date: 2001-01-24

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