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All (22) (22 of 22 results)

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 85-558-X
    Description:

    Cyber-crime is a global problem that in many instances transcends national borders. Historically, compiling meaningful statistics about this activity has been difficult because of the reluctance on the part of victims to report these offences to police. However, because of the financial losses sustained, an increasing number of these crimes are being reported to police. As a result, federal, provincial and territorial governments, as well as the police community, are interested in analyzing national trends on cyber-crime and their impact on Canadians.

    In response to this need for information, the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics (CCJS) conducted a Special Study to examine the issues and data sources related to cyber-crime and to investigate the feasibility of collecting quantitative data from police services in Canada. This report examines definitions of cyber-crime, current legislation in Canada and other countries, existing data sources, summarizes results from consultations with selected police forces, and presents options for collecting cyber-crime data from police agencies.

    Release date: 2002-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20020118430
    Description:

    This issue of Juristat examines how much is being spent to operate the justice system in Canada. Trends in spending and personnel are discussed for policing, courts, legal aid, criminal prosecutions, and corrections. The report data come from several sources, including the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics' resource, Statistics Canada's Financial Management System, and expenditure and personnel surveys. The data cover the period up to 2000-2001.

    Release date: 2002-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20020108429
    Description:

    The Adult Correctional Services Survey (ACSS) collects annual aggregate data from all jurisdictions on the delivery of adult correctional services from both the provincial, territorial and federal correctional systems. Key themes include the average daily counts of adults in custodial facilities, including remand, as well as monthly counts of probationers; and new admissions (commencements) to correctional programs of sentenced custody, probation, conditional sentences and other community-based programs. The survey also captures information on conditional releases to the community, including parole and statutory release. In addition, the survey collects information on the financial and human resources involved in the delivery of adult correctional services. While trends are presented for the key units of count, the reference period for this release is 2000-2001.

    Release date: 2002-10-30

  • Technical products: 85-557-X
    Description:

    In January 1999, the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics (CCJS) received a commitment of four years funding from the federal government's Policy Research Initiative (PRI) to conduct a study on hate crime in Canada. The purpose of the overall study is to enhance our understanding of hate crime and to assess the feasibility of collecting police-reported hate crime statistics in Canada. In 2001, the CCJS released a report entitled "Hate crime in Canada: an overview of issues and data sources", catalogue no. 85-551-XIE.

    This report helped to address some questions regarding the nature and magnitude of hate crimes in Canada, although certain data gaps were identified. As a result, it was determined that a pilot survey should be conducted with police departments that collect hate crime statistics. In order to determine specific information needs for the pilot survey, consultations were held with a number of academics; members of various non-governmental and community organizations; and federal and provincial departments responsible for the administration of justice, as well as police departments.

    The information contained in this report provides a summary of the consultations that were held between September 2001 and March 2002.

    Release date: 2002-10-28

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20020098428
    Description:

    The Juristat publication, "Pilot analysis of recidivism among convicted youth and young adults, 1999/00," summarizes trends from the provincial/territorial courts across Canada that provided data to the Adult Criminal Court Survey (ACCS) and the Youth Court Survey (YCS). This report attempts to gauge the prevalence of recidivism in young adults by examining the conviction histories of young adults convicted in Canadian criminal courts in 1999-2000. It also examines the transition from youth to adult offending, including patterns of re-offending, differences in conviction histories by age of onset and the impact of conviction history on court sentencing.

    Release date: 2002-10-23

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20020088416
    Description:

    This Juristat presents and analyzes information on young offender admissions to custody and community services, with breakdowns by custody (remand, secure, and open) and probation, and key case characteristics such as age, sex, Aboriginal/non-Aboriginal status, and most serious offence. In addition, it includes data pertaining to releases from remand, secure custody, and open custody by sex and time served. These breakdowns are presented and analyzed at the national and provincial/territorial level.

    Alternative measures refer to formalized programs across Canada through which persons who would otherwise proceed to court are dealt with via non-judicial sanctions. An analysis on alternative measures includes data pertaining to the participation and agreement by the youth to enter these community-based alternatives. The key case characteristics of this survey are similar to those collected by the Youth Custody and Community Services survey.

    The Youth Key Indicators describe average daily counts (caseload), which measure the volume of offenders held in custody or on probation on an average day. This information also provides an examination of youth incarceration and probation rates in Canada.

    Data summarized in this Juristat are primarily drawn from three perspectives: 1) The Youth Custody and Community Services (YCCS) survey. The scope of the survey is to collect and analyze information on the application of dispositions under the Young Offenders Act from provincial and territorial agencies responsible for youth corrections and programs. 2) The Alternative Measures survey, which collects and analyzes data on the number of agreements achieved and completed. And, 3) The Youth Key Indicator Report that measures the average counts of youth in custody (remand, secure and open) and on probation.

    Release date: 2002-10-09

  • Technical products: 85-556-X
    Description:

    Recognizing that there is the need for better information and statistics on organized crime, and for methodologies to measure its impact on Canadians, the federal, provincial and territorial ministers responsible for Justice have endorsed a plan to begin addressing Canada's data gap in the area of organized crime.

    The Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics was contracted by the Solicitor General of Canada to investigate the feasibility of collecting quantitative data on organized crime. This report highlights the lessons learned during consultations with selected police intelligence units and it presents a number of options for data collection.

    Release date: 2002-09-27

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20020078417
    Description:

    This annual report is an examination of homicide in Canada. Detailed information is presented on the characteristics of homicide incidents (murder, manslaughter and infanticide), and, within the context of both short and long-term trends, the victims and accused. Geographical patterns of homicide are examined at the national and provincial/territorial levels, as well as for major metropolitan areas. Other key themes include international comparisons of homicide, gang-related homicides, firearm-related homicides, youth homicide and family (including spousal) homicides. The data are intended to respond to the needs of those who work in the criminal justice system, as well as to inform researchers, policy analysts, academics, the media and the public on the nature and extent of homicide in Canada.

    Release date: 2002-09-25

  • Technical products: 85-552-X
    Description:

    This report presents a description of the organization and operation of provincial and territorial maintenance enforcement programs. It describes the relevant provincial legislation, highlights latest developments, provides a general description of each program, describes how each manages cases, intake/withdrawal procedures, tracing, monitoring, payment processing and enforcement practices. As such, the reader will be able to identify the variations and similarities between the various programs. All of the maintenance enforcement programs rely upon several federal acts to collect, trace and enforce support payments. Therefore, a review of the relevant federal legislation is presented first, followed by a description of each provincial and territorial maintenance enforcement program.

    Release date: 2002-08-01

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20020068415
    Description:

    This report is an examination of the annual police-reported crime in Canada. Data are presented within the context of both short and long term trends. The analysis focuses on trends in violent crime, property crime, other Criminal Code offences, impaired driving offences, drug offences and youth crime. Crime rates are examined at the national and provincial/territorial levels, as well as for major metropolitan areas. The trend in Canada's crime rate is put into perspective by comparing it with crime trends in some other industrialized countries. This is an annual periodical of great interest to those who work within the criminal justice system or anyone who is interested in crime in Canada.

    Release date: 2002-07-17

  • Table: 85-224-X20020006455
    Description:

    The 1999 General Social Survey was the first attempt by Statistics Canada to measure spousal violence in a comprehensive way on a traditional victimization survey. Both women and men were asked a module of 10 questions concerning violence by their current or previous spouses and common-law partners. The nature of the violence under study ranged in severity from threats to sexual assault and concerned acts that happened in the 12-month and 5-year periods preceding the survey interview.

    Release date: 2002-06-26

  • Table: 85-224-X20020006457
    Description:

    Over the past two decades, the negative consequences of child maltreatment have been extensively studied. Sexual and physical assault, emotional abuse and neglect can have a tremendous impact on the lives of victims and lead to physical health complications, long-term mental health issues, and problems with relationships or social functioning (Latimer 1998). Increasingly, exposure to spousal violence is being recognized as harmful and as putting children at risk for long-term negative effects.

    Release date: 2002-06-26

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20020058413
    Description:

    This series of reports provides detailed statistics and analysis on a variety of topics and issues concerning Canada's justice system. Juristat is produced in areas such as crime, youth and adult courts, homicide and corrections. Additional issues of Juristat are also produced each year on current topics of interest to the justice community. This is a unique periodical, of great interest to those who have to plan, establish, administer and evaluate justice programs and projects, or to anyone who has an interest in the justice system.

    Release date: 2002-06-26

  • Table: 85-224-X20020006456
    Description:

    Persons aged 65 years and older constitute one of the fastest growing segments of the Canadian population. In 2000, there were an estimated 3.8 million older men and women representing 13% of the country's total population, up from 9% just 20 years earlier. Declining fertility rates and increased longevity, due primarily to improved health care, have contributed to this rapid growth. And as the baby-boom generation (those born between 1946 and 1965) begins to reach the age of 65 early in the next decade, the absolute number of older adults, as well as their share of the total population, is expected to grow even more quickly. Indeed, by 2021, population projections estimate that older Canadians will number close to 6.7 million or about one-fifth of the total population (George et al. 2001).

    Release date: 2002-06-26

  • Table: 85F0027X2002001
    Description:

    The Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics conducted a special study on conditional sentencing in 2001 to improve the level and quality of information available on this disposition and to assess the influence of the new sanction on correctional services caseloads. The purpose of this bulletin is to provide a preliminary examination of the results of the special study, as well as the most current data from the Adult Correctional Services Survey and the Adult Criminal Court Survey.

    Release date: 2002-06-04

  • Table: 85F0027X2002002
    Description:

    This bulletin examines 'home invasions'. Recent high-profile incidents of 'home invasion' have received significant exposure in the media, particularly those where the elderly have been targeted. The impact of 'home invasions' extends beyond the violence of the crime itself to a long-term loss of the victim's sense of safety at home.

    Release date: 2002-06-04

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20020048414
    Description:

    The 2000 International Crime Victimization Survey (ICVS) provides comparable international information on the nature and extent of crime. Respondents supply detailed information on 11 types of crime, including when, where and how often offences occurred over the previous five years; whether offences were reported to the police; and whether victimization experiences were considered serious. Participants give their opinions on public safety, policing and sentencing.

    This Juristat presents an overview of the findings of the 2000 ICVS and makes comparisons with previous survey cycles from 1989, 1992 and 1996. The majority of the analysis focuses on data from the following 13 of 17 participants: Canada, Australia, Belgium, England and Wales, Finland, France, Japan, the Netherlands, Northern Ireland, Poland, Scotland, Sweden and the United States. Canada was one of the 17 industrialized countries that participated in 2000 and is one of five industrialized countries to have participated in all four cycles of the survey.

    Release date: 2002-05-30

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 85F0036X
    Description:

    This study documents the methodological and technical challenges that are involved in performing analysis on small groups using a sample survey, oversampling, response rate, non-response rate due to language, release feasibility and sampling variability. It is based on the 1999 General Social Survey (GSS) on victimization.

    Release date: 2002-05-14

  • Journals and periodicals: 85-555-X
    Description:

    This report uses census data from 1996 and 1991 to provide a quantitative profile of persons working in justice-related professions in Canada. The profile contains a general description of such characteristics as age, average age, highest level of schooling, average employment income and employment status. Furthermore, it provides detailed information on certain groups for which national data were available. These groups include, women and men, Aboriginal people, visible minorities and immigrants.

    The justice sectors in this report include: police personnel (including : commissioned police officers and police officers), court personnel (including judges, court officers, justices of the peace, court recorders, medical transcriptionists, sheriffs, bailiffs and court clerks), legal personnel (including, lawyers, Quebec notaries, paralegal and related occupations and legal secretaries), probation and parole officers, correctional officers, and other protective service personnel (including: security guards and related occupations, and other protective service occupations).

    Release date: 2002-04-11

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20020038373
    Description:

    In 2000/01, 99,590 cases were processed in the youth courts of Canada. This represents a 2% decrease in the number of cases processed from the previous year and a decrease of 10% from 1996/97.

    The number of Property crime cases heard in youth courts decreased annually, dropping 23% between 1996/97 and 2000/01. The number of Violent crime cases has dropped by 6% since 1996/97. The number of Drug-related cases has increased by 30% since 1996/97.

    Release date: 2002-03-21

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20020028400
    Description:

    This series of reports provides detailed statistics and analysis on a variety of topics and issues concerning Canada's justice system. The annual Juristat, Adult criminal court statistics, 2000/01, summarizes trends from provincial/territorial adult criminal courts across Canada, which provided data to the Adult Criminal Court Survey (ACCS) for the 2000/01 fiscal year. In this Juristat, information is presented on the characteristics of cases and accused persons, the number of appearances, conviction rates, sentencing trends and related issues. As well, statistics are presented for a five-year period (1996/97 through 2000/01).

    Release date: 2002-03-14

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20020018399
    Description:

    This series of reports provides detailed statistics and analysis on a variety of topics and issues concerning Canada's justice system. The Juristat, Case Processing in Criminal Courts, 1999/00, summarizes trends from provincial/territorial courts across Canada, which provided data to the Adult Criminal Court Survey (ACCS), and the Youth Court Survey (YCS). The primary focus of this Juristat is the nature and extent of case processing time (elapsed time), with emphasis on those factors which have the greatest impact on the length of time it takes a case to be processed in the court system.

    Release date: 2002-02-07

Data (5)

Data (5) (5 of 5 results)

  • Table: 85-224-X20020006455
    Description:

    The 1999 General Social Survey was the first attempt by Statistics Canada to measure spousal violence in a comprehensive way on a traditional victimization survey. Both women and men were asked a module of 10 questions concerning violence by their current or previous spouses and common-law partners. The nature of the violence under study ranged in severity from threats to sexual assault and concerned acts that happened in the 12-month and 5-year periods preceding the survey interview.

    Release date: 2002-06-26

  • Table: 85-224-X20020006457
    Description:

    Over the past two decades, the negative consequences of child maltreatment have been extensively studied. Sexual and physical assault, emotional abuse and neglect can have a tremendous impact on the lives of victims and lead to physical health complications, long-term mental health issues, and problems with relationships or social functioning (Latimer 1998). Increasingly, exposure to spousal violence is being recognized as harmful and as putting children at risk for long-term negative effects.

    Release date: 2002-06-26

  • Table: 85-224-X20020006456
    Description:

    Persons aged 65 years and older constitute one of the fastest growing segments of the Canadian population. In 2000, there were an estimated 3.8 million older men and women representing 13% of the country's total population, up from 9% just 20 years earlier. Declining fertility rates and increased longevity, due primarily to improved health care, have contributed to this rapid growth. And as the baby-boom generation (those born between 1946 and 1965) begins to reach the age of 65 early in the next decade, the absolute number of older adults, as well as their share of the total population, is expected to grow even more quickly. Indeed, by 2021, population projections estimate that older Canadians will number close to 6.7 million or about one-fifth of the total population (George et al. 2001).

    Release date: 2002-06-26

  • Table: 85F0027X2002001
    Description:

    The Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics conducted a special study on conditional sentencing in 2001 to improve the level and quality of information available on this disposition and to assess the influence of the new sanction on correctional services caseloads. The purpose of this bulletin is to provide a preliminary examination of the results of the special study, as well as the most current data from the Adult Correctional Services Survey and the Adult Criminal Court Survey.

    Release date: 2002-06-04

  • Table: 85F0027X2002002
    Description:

    This bulletin examines 'home invasions'. Recent high-profile incidents of 'home invasion' have received significant exposure in the media, particularly those where the elderly have been targeted. The impact of 'home invasions' extends beyond the violence of the crime itself to a long-term loss of the victim's sense of safety at home.

    Release date: 2002-06-04

Analysis (12)

Analysis (12) (12 of 12 results)

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20020118430
    Description:

    This issue of Juristat examines how much is being spent to operate the justice system in Canada. Trends in spending and personnel are discussed for policing, courts, legal aid, criminal prosecutions, and corrections. The report data come from several sources, including the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics' resource, Statistics Canada's Financial Management System, and expenditure and personnel surveys. The data cover the period up to 2000-2001.

    Release date: 2002-10-31

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20020108429
    Description:

    The Adult Correctional Services Survey (ACSS) collects annual aggregate data from all jurisdictions on the delivery of adult correctional services from both the provincial, territorial and federal correctional systems. Key themes include the average daily counts of adults in custodial facilities, including remand, as well as monthly counts of probationers; and new admissions (commencements) to correctional programs of sentenced custody, probation, conditional sentences and other community-based programs. The survey also captures information on conditional releases to the community, including parole and statutory release. In addition, the survey collects information on the financial and human resources involved in the delivery of adult correctional services. While trends are presented for the key units of count, the reference period for this release is 2000-2001.

    Release date: 2002-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20020098428
    Description:

    The Juristat publication, "Pilot analysis of recidivism among convicted youth and young adults, 1999/00," summarizes trends from the provincial/territorial courts across Canada that provided data to the Adult Criminal Court Survey (ACCS) and the Youth Court Survey (YCS). This report attempts to gauge the prevalence of recidivism in young adults by examining the conviction histories of young adults convicted in Canadian criminal courts in 1999-2000. It also examines the transition from youth to adult offending, including patterns of re-offending, differences in conviction histories by age of onset and the impact of conviction history on court sentencing.

    Release date: 2002-10-23

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20020088416
    Description:

    This Juristat presents and analyzes information on young offender admissions to custody and community services, with breakdowns by custody (remand, secure, and open) and probation, and key case characteristics such as age, sex, Aboriginal/non-Aboriginal status, and most serious offence. In addition, it includes data pertaining to releases from remand, secure custody, and open custody by sex and time served. These breakdowns are presented and analyzed at the national and provincial/territorial level.

    Alternative measures refer to formalized programs across Canada through which persons who would otherwise proceed to court are dealt with via non-judicial sanctions. An analysis on alternative measures includes data pertaining to the participation and agreement by the youth to enter these community-based alternatives. The key case characteristics of this survey are similar to those collected by the Youth Custody and Community Services survey.

    The Youth Key Indicators describe average daily counts (caseload), which measure the volume of offenders held in custody or on probation on an average day. This information also provides an examination of youth incarceration and probation rates in Canada.

    Data summarized in this Juristat are primarily drawn from three perspectives: 1) The Youth Custody and Community Services (YCCS) survey. The scope of the survey is to collect and analyze information on the application of dispositions under the Young Offenders Act from provincial and territorial agencies responsible for youth corrections and programs. 2) The Alternative Measures survey, which collects and analyzes data on the number of agreements achieved and completed. And, 3) The Youth Key Indicator Report that measures the average counts of youth in custody (remand, secure and open) and on probation.

    Release date: 2002-10-09

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20020078417
    Description:

    This annual report is an examination of homicide in Canada. Detailed information is presented on the characteristics of homicide incidents (murder, manslaughter and infanticide), and, within the context of both short and long-term trends, the victims and accused. Geographical patterns of homicide are examined at the national and provincial/territorial levels, as well as for major metropolitan areas. Other key themes include international comparisons of homicide, gang-related homicides, firearm-related homicides, youth homicide and family (including spousal) homicides. The data are intended to respond to the needs of those who work in the criminal justice system, as well as to inform researchers, policy analysts, academics, the media and the public on the nature and extent of homicide in Canada.

    Release date: 2002-09-25

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20020068415
    Description:

    This report is an examination of the annual police-reported crime in Canada. Data are presented within the context of both short and long term trends. The analysis focuses on trends in violent crime, property crime, other Criminal Code offences, impaired driving offences, drug offences and youth crime. Crime rates are examined at the national and provincial/territorial levels, as well as for major metropolitan areas. The trend in Canada's crime rate is put into perspective by comparing it with crime trends in some other industrialized countries. This is an annual periodical of great interest to those who work within the criminal justice system or anyone who is interested in crime in Canada.

    Release date: 2002-07-17

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20020058413
    Description:

    This series of reports provides detailed statistics and analysis on a variety of topics and issues concerning Canada's justice system. Juristat is produced in areas such as crime, youth and adult courts, homicide and corrections. Additional issues of Juristat are also produced each year on current topics of interest to the justice community. This is a unique periodical, of great interest to those who have to plan, establish, administer and evaluate justice programs and projects, or to anyone who has an interest in the justice system.

    Release date: 2002-06-26

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20020048414
    Description:

    The 2000 International Crime Victimization Survey (ICVS) provides comparable international information on the nature and extent of crime. Respondents supply detailed information on 11 types of crime, including when, where and how often offences occurred over the previous five years; whether offences were reported to the police; and whether victimization experiences were considered serious. Participants give their opinions on public safety, policing and sentencing.

    This Juristat presents an overview of the findings of the 2000 ICVS and makes comparisons with previous survey cycles from 1989, 1992 and 1996. The majority of the analysis focuses on data from the following 13 of 17 participants: Canada, Australia, Belgium, England and Wales, Finland, France, Japan, the Netherlands, Northern Ireland, Poland, Scotland, Sweden and the United States. Canada was one of the 17 industrialized countries that participated in 2000 and is one of five industrialized countries to have participated in all four cycles of the survey.

    Release date: 2002-05-30

  • Journals and periodicals: 85-555-X
    Description:

    This report uses census data from 1996 and 1991 to provide a quantitative profile of persons working in justice-related professions in Canada. The profile contains a general description of such characteristics as age, average age, highest level of schooling, average employment income and employment status. Furthermore, it provides detailed information on certain groups for which national data were available. These groups include, women and men, Aboriginal people, visible minorities and immigrants.

    The justice sectors in this report include: police personnel (including : commissioned police officers and police officers), court personnel (including judges, court officers, justices of the peace, court recorders, medical transcriptionists, sheriffs, bailiffs and court clerks), legal personnel (including, lawyers, Quebec notaries, paralegal and related occupations and legal secretaries), probation and parole officers, correctional officers, and other protective service personnel (including: security guards and related occupations, and other protective service occupations).

    Release date: 2002-04-11

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20020038373
    Description:

    In 2000/01, 99,590 cases were processed in the youth courts of Canada. This represents a 2% decrease in the number of cases processed from the previous year and a decrease of 10% from 1996/97.

    The number of Property crime cases heard in youth courts decreased annually, dropping 23% between 1996/97 and 2000/01. The number of Violent crime cases has dropped by 6% since 1996/97. The number of Drug-related cases has increased by 30% since 1996/97.

    Release date: 2002-03-21

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20020028400
    Description:

    This series of reports provides detailed statistics and analysis on a variety of topics and issues concerning Canada's justice system. The annual Juristat, Adult criminal court statistics, 2000/01, summarizes trends from provincial/territorial adult criminal courts across Canada, which provided data to the Adult Criminal Court Survey (ACCS) for the 2000/01 fiscal year. In this Juristat, information is presented on the characteristics of cases and accused persons, the number of appearances, conviction rates, sentencing trends and related issues. As well, statistics are presented for a five-year period (1996/97 through 2000/01).

    Release date: 2002-03-14

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20020018399
    Description:

    This series of reports provides detailed statistics and analysis on a variety of topics and issues concerning Canada's justice system. The Juristat, Case Processing in Criminal Courts, 1999/00, summarizes trends from provincial/territorial courts across Canada, which provided data to the Adult Criminal Court Survey (ACCS), and the Youth Court Survey (YCS). The primary focus of this Juristat is the nature and extent of case processing time (elapsed time), with emphasis on those factors which have the greatest impact on the length of time it takes a case to be processed in the court system.

    Release date: 2002-02-07

Reference (5)

Reference (5) (5 of 5 results)

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 85-558-X
    Description:

    Cyber-crime is a global problem that in many instances transcends national borders. Historically, compiling meaningful statistics about this activity has been difficult because of the reluctance on the part of victims to report these offences to police. However, because of the financial losses sustained, an increasing number of these crimes are being reported to police. As a result, federal, provincial and territorial governments, as well as the police community, are interested in analyzing national trends on cyber-crime and their impact on Canadians.

    In response to this need for information, the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics (CCJS) conducted a Special Study to examine the issues and data sources related to cyber-crime and to investigate the feasibility of collecting quantitative data from police services in Canada. This report examines definitions of cyber-crime, current legislation in Canada and other countries, existing data sources, summarizes results from consultations with selected police forces, and presents options for collecting cyber-crime data from police agencies.

    Release date: 2002-12-19

  • Technical products: 85-557-X
    Description:

    In January 1999, the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics (CCJS) received a commitment of four years funding from the federal government's Policy Research Initiative (PRI) to conduct a study on hate crime in Canada. The purpose of the overall study is to enhance our understanding of hate crime and to assess the feasibility of collecting police-reported hate crime statistics in Canada. In 2001, the CCJS released a report entitled "Hate crime in Canada: an overview of issues and data sources", catalogue no. 85-551-XIE.

    This report helped to address some questions regarding the nature and magnitude of hate crimes in Canada, although certain data gaps were identified. As a result, it was determined that a pilot survey should be conducted with police departments that collect hate crime statistics. In order to determine specific information needs for the pilot survey, consultations were held with a number of academics; members of various non-governmental and community organizations; and federal and provincial departments responsible for the administration of justice, as well as police departments.

    The information contained in this report provides a summary of the consultations that were held between September 2001 and March 2002.

    Release date: 2002-10-28

  • Technical products: 85-556-X
    Description:

    Recognizing that there is the need for better information and statistics on organized crime, and for methodologies to measure its impact on Canadians, the federal, provincial and territorial ministers responsible for Justice have endorsed a plan to begin addressing Canada's data gap in the area of organized crime.

    The Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics was contracted by the Solicitor General of Canada to investigate the feasibility of collecting quantitative data on organized crime. This report highlights the lessons learned during consultations with selected police intelligence units and it presents a number of options for data collection.

    Release date: 2002-09-27

  • Technical products: 85-552-X
    Description:

    This report presents a description of the organization and operation of provincial and territorial maintenance enforcement programs. It describes the relevant provincial legislation, highlights latest developments, provides a general description of each program, describes how each manages cases, intake/withdrawal procedures, tracing, monitoring, payment processing and enforcement practices. As such, the reader will be able to identify the variations and similarities between the various programs. All of the maintenance enforcement programs rely upon several federal acts to collect, trace and enforce support payments. Therefore, a review of the relevant federal legislation is presented first, followed by a description of each provincial and territorial maintenance enforcement program.

    Release date: 2002-08-01

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 85F0036X
    Description:

    This study documents the methodological and technical challenges that are involved in performing analysis on small groups using a sample survey, oversampling, response rate, non-response rate due to language, release feasibility and sampling variability. It is based on the 1999 General Social Survey (GSS) on victimization.

    Release date: 2002-05-14

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