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  • Table: 85-227-X
    Description:

    This report presents indicators to measure the workload and performance of the criminal justice system, as well as indictors on a number of socio-demographic and economic factors that can be associated with crime and victimization. In this report, workload and volume measures centre on the work of the police, courts, corrections, diversion programs and victim services and changes over time. Examples of workload and volume indicators examined in this report include: the number of criminal incidents known to police; the number of people serviced by alternative measures, mediation, dispute resolution and diversion programs; the number of cases dealt with in court; average counts in corrections institutions, and; the number of persons assisted by victim service agencies. Performance indicators are organized according to the following five general goals of the criminal justice system: 1) Public order, safety and national security through prevention and intervention; 2) Offender accountability, reintegration and rehabilitation; 3) Public trust, confidence and respect for the justice system; 4) Social equity and access to the justice system for all citizens, and; 5) Victim needs served. Examples of performance indicators examined in this report are: the overall cost of administering the sectors of the criminal justice system; the type and length of sentences ordered in court; public satisfaction with the police, the courts, and the correctional and parole systems; the number of applications for legal aid, and; the number of services for victims of crime. The various socio-demographic and economic indicators included in this report are presented in order to present statistical information on the factors that can be associated with crime. These 'context of crime indicators are organized into three broad categories: Community and society, Family, and Individual. Examples of such indicators examined in this report are: the age and sex distributions of the population; income levels and labour force participation; levels of social engagement; levels of gang activity; family structures; levels of child support; levels of education; the rate of literacy, and; the rate of alcohol and drug abuse among the adult and youth population.

    Release date: 2005-12-20

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20050088970
    Description:

    The federal government and the provincial and territorial governments share the administration of correctional services in Canada, which include custody (sentenced custody, remand and other temporary detention) and community-based sentences (probation, conditional sentences) as well as statutory release and parole supervision. Correctional services agencies at both levels work toward the same goal, that is, the protection of society as well as the rehabilitation of offenders and their safe reintegration into communities as productive members.

    This Juristat reports on data from the Adult Correctional Services Survey for the 2003/04 fiscal year, and shows trends in these data from 1994/95. It examines average counts of adults who have been incarcerated, who were under community supervision on probation, serving a conditional sentence or on conditional release (parole and statutory release). The number of admissions to these programs, the offences leading to the admission, the duration of the incarceration or probation, as well as some offender characteristics, such as age, sex and Aboriginal identity are also described. Furthermore, the cost of correctional services in 2003/04, broken down by type of activity and level of government is examined. The average daily inmate costs from 1994/95 to 2003/04, as well as the number of correctional institutions in Canada in 2003/04 are reported.

    Release date: 2005-12-16

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2005006
    Description:

    This is the first quasi-national Canadian study of the criminal careers of a birth cohort. It uses linked data from the Youth Court Survey and Adult Criminal Court Survey to describe the court careers up to the 22nd birthday of Canadians born in 1979/80. The study includes six provinces - Newfoundland and Labrador, Prince Edward Island, Quebec, Ontario, Saskatchewan, and Alberta - accounting for approximately 78% of the population of Canada.

    Eighteen per 100 members of the cohort were referred to court for a criminal offence allegedly committed before their 22nd birthday. Thirteen were found guilty of at least one offence, and ten received a sentence which put them under the supervision of correctional or probation authorities. The peak age of referral to court is 18 years. On average, between the ages of 12 and 21 inclusive, alleged offenders were referred to court in connection with 3.1 criminal incidents' or 2.4, if administrative offences are excluded. Just over half of alleged offenders had only one incident in their court career. Seventeen percent of alleged offenders were classified as chronic offenders, who were responsible for 58% of all alleged criminal incidents.

    Individuals whose contact with the court system begins later in adolescence tend to be involved in fewer criminal incidents. The lengths of court careers vary widely, but the mean and median lengths are 20 months and 13 months respectively. Age-specific annual rates of alleged offending are similar for accused males and females, and peak at 15 years of age. There is no particular tendency to escalation, de-escalation, or stability in the seriousness of repeated court referrals: all three patterns occur frequently. Thirty-seven percent of individuals with multiple court referrals have adolescent-limited careers (i.e. no incidents after the 18th birthday which resulted in court referral), 43% have adult-onset careers (no incidents before the 18th birthday), and 20% are persistent offenders (with incidents both as youths and as adults). The latter have many more criminal incidents in their careers and are much more likely than the others to have been referred to court for an offence against the person; however, the incidents in their careers are not more serious on average, and they are not more likely to have had an early onset of contact with the court system.

    The file from which these results were derived could support much more detailed analyses of the topics which are touched on by this report, as well as other topics which have not been addressed, such as the timing of incidents during the career, the processing of cases through the courts, the sequence of case outcomes and sentences, and the interactions between sentencing and future offending, including the impact on careers of incapacitation. As additional years of court data become available, future research should follow court careers past the 22nd birthday. This will result in a more complete picture of the court careers of chronic, persistent offenders, as well as a more thorough investigation of the court careers of "adult-onset " offenders, who had no contact with the court system during adolescence.

    Release date: 2005-12-09

  • Public use microdata: 12M0018X
    Description:

    Cycle 18 of the GSS is the fourth cycle (after cycles 3, 8 and 13) to collect information on the nature and extent of criminal victimization in Canada. Content from Cycle 13 on senior abuse and public perception of alternatives to imprisonment was not repeated. New topics of interest were added including stalking, use of restraining orders and social disorder. Other subjects common to all four cycles include perceptions of crime, police and courts; crime prevention precautions; and accident and crime incident reports.

    The target population of the GSS is all individuals aged 15 and over living in a private household in one of the ten provinces.

    Release date: 2005-11-24

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20050078803
    Description:

    In 2004, as part of its General Social Survey program, Statistics Canada conducted a survey on victimization and public perceptions of crime and the justice system. It was the fourth time that the General Social Survey (GSS) had examined victimization - previous surveys were conducted in 1999, 1993 and 1988.

    For the 2004 survey, interviews were conducted by telephone with approximately 24,000 people, aged 15 and older, living in the 10 provinces. Respondents were asked about their experiences with criminal victimization. Those respondents who had been victims of a crime in the previous 12 months were asked for detailed information on each incident, including when and where it occurred; whether the incident was reported to the police; and how they were affected by the experience.

    This Juristat explores the overall trends and regional variations of criminal victimization, as well as the individual risk factors associated with victimization. The impacts and consequences of being victimized are discussed, along with the informal and formal sources of support for victims.

    Release date: 2005-11-24

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20050068650
    Description:

    This annual report is an examination of homicide in Canada. Detailed information is presented on the characteristics of homicide incidents (murder, manslaughter and infanticide), victims and accused within the context of both short and long-term trends. Geographical patterns of homicide are examined at the national and provincial/territorial levels, as well as for major metropolitan areas. Other key themes include international comparisons of homicide, gang-related homicides, firearm-related homicides, youth homicide and family (including spousal) homicides. The data are intended to respond to the needs of those who work in the criminal justice system as well as to inform researchers, policy analysts, academics, the media and the public on the nature and extent of homicide in Canada.

    Release date: 2005-10-06

  • Table: 85-567-X
    Description:

    Provincial and territorial governments are responsible for the administration of community-based correctional services in Canada for adults and youth, which include, but are not limited to probation, conditional sentences, and temporary absence programs. Although the Criminal Code of Canada, the Young Offenders Act and the Youth Criminal Justice Act set out guidelines, jurisdictions are not obliged to follow them directly. Jurisdictions will differ, sometimes substantially, in their administration.

    This publication provides a descriptive overview of sentences and the delivery of community correctional services across all jurisdictions in Canada for both adult and youth. In addition, this publication reports on community corrections data collected from the special study, as well as data from the Adult Correctional Services Survey, the Key Indicator Report, the Youth Custody and Community Services Survey, and the Alternative Measures Survey. It examines admissions and average counts of adults and youth who were under community supervision, showing trends as far back as 1993/94. Furthermore, data on offender characteristics, such as sex and Aboriginal status are also presented.

    Release date: 2005-09-07

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20050058076
    Description:

    The annual report on crime statistics presents an analysis of the police-reported data in 2004. These data are presented within the context of both short and long term trends. Data are examined at the national, provincial and territorial levels, as well as for major metropolitan areas by type of crime. The report distinguishes between violent crime, property crime, other Criminal Code offences, impaired driving, drug offences and youth crime.

    Release date: 2005-07-21

  • Table: 85-224-X20050008649
    Description:

    Persons over the age of 65 represented 13% of the Canadian population compared to 11% in. It is projected that persons age 65 years and over will represent 15% of the population of Canada. Concern for the well-being of seniors is heightened by the fact that this segment of the population is growing faster than any other age cohort. There are numerous implications for Canadian society as a result of this growth including meeting the health needs of an aging population as well as ensuring that seniors are not victims of violent crime either from within or outside of the family.

    Release date: 2005-07-14

  • Table: 85-224-X20050008648
    Description:

    This chapter will focus on the physical and sexual assaults against children and youth (under the age of 18) that were reported to police services. In addition, other forms of child maltreatment and child abuse are presented including the extent to which children and youth witness violence in the home. System responses to the issue of child maltreatment and violence will be examined, using information from the Transition Home and Victim Services Surveys. As well, recent policy developments to address and improve the situation of family violence against children and youth in Canada will be highlighted.

    Release date: 2005-07-14

  • Table: 85-224-X20050008644
    Description:

    Recently, through the General Social Survey (GSS) on Victimization, questions related to spousal violence against women and men were repeated. Results of this survey permit the analysis of how spousal violence has changed in nature and extent over the two cycles of the survey from and, for the first time, provide trends on male spousal violence. As will be highlighted in this chapter, the GSS illustrates that overall spousal violence rates have remained stable, but violence in previous relationships has decreased for both women and men and continues to be more common than in current relationships. In addition, the data continue to show that violence is more prevalent in common-law relationships than in marital unions, and although relatively equal proportions of women and men report some type of spousal violence, women continue to suffer more serious and repeated spousal violence than do men and incur more serious consequences as a result of this violence.

    Release date: 2005-07-14

  • Table: 85-224-X20050008647
    Description:

    This chapter examines homicide-suicide trends involving three populations; spouses, children and youth under the age of 18 and older adults (65 years of age and older). The following analysis use data from the Homicide Survey explores the Homicide narratives to add contextual information.

    Release date: 2005-07-14

  • Table: 85-224-X20050008645
    Description:

    In the past decade, four large-scale victimization surveys have been conducted to obtain national population estimates of stalking. These surveys have been carried out in the United Kingdom, the United States, Australia and Canada. For the first time in Statistics Canada measured stalking through the General Social Survey on Victimization (GSS). The present analysis details the prevalence of stalking in Canada, describing victim characteristics, victim'offender relationships, types of stalking experienced, violent stalking relationships, help-seeking behaviour of stalking victims, emotional consequences of stalking, reasons for reporting or not reporting the stalking to the police, types of charges laid against stalkers, and the use and breach of restraining orders.

    Release date: 2005-07-14

  • Table: 85-224-X20050008646
    Description:

    Using data from the Homicide Survey, the following chapter examines the different circumstances and characteristics of family-related homicides in Canada which occurred. The analysis includes details about spousal homicides, child and youth homicides and family homicides of older persons (65+). This chapter will present data on the characteristics of the accused, the incident and the victim in these homicides.

    Release date: 2005-07-14

  • Table: 85-565-X
    Description:

    In 2004, as part of its General Social Survey program, Statistics Canada conducted a survey on victimization and public perceptions of crime and the justice system. It was the fourth time that the General Social Survey (GSS) had examined victimization - previous surveys were conducted in 1988, 1993, and 1999. The target population was Canadians aged 15 years and older living in the ten provinces.

    This report provides an overview of the main findings from cycle 18 of the General Social Survey on Victimization and makes comparisons with previous survey cycles. The analysis focuses on Canadians' outlook on crime and the criminal justice system, as well as their fear of crime. Variations by province are also presented.

    Release date: 2005-07-07

  • Table: 85-566-X
    Description:

    This report presents an overview of Canadians' outlook on crime and the criminal justice system at both the national and Census Metropolitan Area levels. The information was collected in 2004 through Cycle 18 of the General Social Survey (GSS) on victimization. This survey, which has been previously carried out in 1999, 1993, and 1988, collects information on Canadians' experience of victimization, and public attitudes towards crime, police, courts, prison and parole. The target population of the GSS is all individuals aged 15 and over living in a private household in one of the ten provinces.

    Release date: 2005-07-07

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2005005
    Description:

    This research paper provides an overview of patterns in crime data between 1962 and 2003, with a particular focus on the decline in recorded crime throughout the 1990s. This paper also explores the statistical relationship between selected crime patterns (homicide, robbery, break and enter and motor vehicle theft) and various macro-level demographic and economic changes. Analysis is based on police-reported crime data from the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey, Consumer Price Index, Labour Force Survey and institution data on the control and sale of alcoholic beverages in Canada.

    In general, bivariate results indicate that throughout the 1990s the greatest gains in reducing crime rates were made in property crimes, especially among young offenders. Significant declines were also noted for robberies and homicides involving firearms as well as homicides overall.

    Multivariate results indicate that, at the macro-level, different types of crime are influenced by different social and economic factors. Specifically, shifts in inflation were found to be associated with changes in the level of all financially motivated crimes examined (robbery, break and enter, motor vehicle theft). Shifts in the age composition of the population, on the other hand, were found to be correlated with shifts in rates of break and enter and were not statistically significant for the other types of crimes studied. Finally, shifts in alcohol consumption and unemployment rates were found to be correlated with shifts in homicide rates.

    Release date: 2005-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20040048042
    Description:

    Trends in rates of death involving firearms are examined from 1979 to 2002. Rates of firearms-related suicide, homicide, and unintentional death are reported over time and by province. Recent rates of gun-related death in Canada's four largest cities -Toronto, Montréal, Vancouver and Calgary -are compared.

    Release date: 2005-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20050047948
    Description:

    This series of reports provides detailed statistics and analysis on a variety of topics and issues concerning Canada's justice system. The annual Juristat, Youth Court Statistics, 2003-2004, summarizes trends from provincial/territorial youth courts across Canada, which provide data to the Youth Court Survey (YCS). In this Juristat, information is presented on the characteristics of cases and accused youth, conviction rates, sentencing and related issues. As well, statistics are presented for the thirteen year period from 1991-1992, the first year for which national data are available for the YCS, to the current year, 2003-2004.

    Release date: 2005-06-24

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20050037946
    Description:

    This Juristat presents a profile of all shelters in Canada that provided residential services to abused women and their children in 2003-2004. Additionally, through the use of a snapshot day survey (April 14, 2004), selected characteristics of residents (i.e., reasons for coming to the shelter, age group, parenting responsibilities, relationship to abuser, involvement of the criminal justice system, etc.) are presented. Data for this Juristat come primarily from the Transition Home Survey (THS), a biennial census of all residential facilities for female victims of domestic violence conducted by the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics as part of the federal government's Family Violence Initiative. Questionnaires are mailed to all shelters known to provide residential services to abused women in every province and territory. Information is collected on the characteristics of the facilities and the services provided during the previous 12 months (April 1, 2003 to March 31, 2004). Cross-sectional comparisons and comparisons using time-series data from the THS Trend File are also included. The THS Trend File contains only those facilities that participated in the survey in each of the following years: 1997/98, 1999/00, 2001/02 and 2003/04.

    Release date: 2005-06-15

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20050028411
    Description:

    This Juristat examines the case histories and correctional outcomes of adults under provincial correctional supervision in Saskatchewan during the years 1999/00 through 2003/04. This is the first report analyzing data from the newly implemented Integrated Correctional Services Survey (ICSS). It provides an analysis of characteristics of persons supervised in correctional services, and a description of their involvement, any re-involvements, as well as a comparative analysis of these characteristics between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal persons. Several cohorts of persons released from supervised correctional activity in Saskatchewan are analyzed regarding their return to correctional services as well as the relationship between these re-involvements and various demographic, case history and criminal justice factors.

    Release date: 2005-06-03

  • Technical products: 85-564-X
    Description:

    This objective of this report is to present the status of national data on Aboriginal people who come into contact with the criminal justice system as offenders and victims. The report examines the current and potential collection of an individual's Aboriginal identity through various justice-related surveys at Statistics Canada, the challenges within these surveys to collect these data and provides some insight into the quality of these data. The data and sources are examined within the context of information needs for the justice and social policy sectors, and in relation to the preferred method of measuring Aboriginal Identity at Statistics Canada. Data sources examined include the Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey, the Homicide Survey, the Integrated Criminal Courts Survey, the Adult Corrections Survey, the Youth Custody and Community Services Survey, the Youth Alternative Measures Survey, the Transition Home Survey, the Victim Services Survey and the General Social Survey on Victimization. Finally, the report briefly describes efforts by other countries to improve justice-related information on their indigenous populations.

    Release date: 2005-05-10

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20050018064
    Description:

    This issue of Juristat presents statistical information on the extent and nature of violent victimization of children and youth in Canada in 2003 as reported to a subset of police services. Rates of victimization are presented for each age and sex. Data describes the different types of assaults perpetrated against children and youth, the weapons used to inflict injury, the injuries sustained and the location and time of the assault relative to various age groups. Other topics included in the report are child pornography, sexual exploitation of children, kidnapping and abduction of children. Data used in this report include police statistics from the Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey, the Homicide Survey and court data from the Adult Criminal Court Survey.

    Release date: 2005-04-20

Data (11)

Data (11) (11 of 11 results)

  • Table: 85-227-X
    Description:

    This report presents indicators to measure the workload and performance of the criminal justice system, as well as indictors on a number of socio-demographic and economic factors that can be associated with crime and victimization. In this report, workload and volume measures centre on the work of the police, courts, corrections, diversion programs and victim services and changes over time. Examples of workload and volume indicators examined in this report include: the number of criminal incidents known to police; the number of people serviced by alternative measures, mediation, dispute resolution and diversion programs; the number of cases dealt with in court; average counts in corrections institutions, and; the number of persons assisted by victim service agencies. Performance indicators are organized according to the following five general goals of the criminal justice system: 1) Public order, safety and national security through prevention and intervention; 2) Offender accountability, reintegration and rehabilitation; 3) Public trust, confidence and respect for the justice system; 4) Social equity and access to the justice system for all citizens, and; 5) Victim needs served. Examples of performance indicators examined in this report are: the overall cost of administering the sectors of the criminal justice system; the type and length of sentences ordered in court; public satisfaction with the police, the courts, and the correctional and parole systems; the number of applications for legal aid, and; the number of services for victims of crime. The various socio-demographic and economic indicators included in this report are presented in order to present statistical information on the factors that can be associated with crime. These 'context of crime indicators are organized into three broad categories: Community and society, Family, and Individual. Examples of such indicators examined in this report are: the age and sex distributions of the population; income levels and labour force participation; levels of social engagement; levels of gang activity; family structures; levels of child support; levels of education; the rate of literacy, and; the rate of alcohol and drug abuse among the adult and youth population.

    Release date: 2005-12-20

  • Public use microdata: 12M0018X
    Description:

    Cycle 18 of the GSS is the fourth cycle (after cycles 3, 8 and 13) to collect information on the nature and extent of criminal victimization in Canada. Content from Cycle 13 on senior abuse and public perception of alternatives to imprisonment was not repeated. New topics of interest were added including stalking, use of restraining orders and social disorder. Other subjects common to all four cycles include perceptions of crime, police and courts; crime prevention precautions; and accident and crime incident reports.

    The target population of the GSS is all individuals aged 15 and over living in a private household in one of the ten provinces.

    Release date: 2005-11-24

  • Table: 85-567-X
    Description:

    Provincial and territorial governments are responsible for the administration of community-based correctional services in Canada for adults and youth, which include, but are not limited to probation, conditional sentences, and temporary absence programs. Although the Criminal Code of Canada, the Young Offenders Act and the Youth Criminal Justice Act set out guidelines, jurisdictions are not obliged to follow them directly. Jurisdictions will differ, sometimes substantially, in their administration.

    This publication provides a descriptive overview of sentences and the delivery of community correctional services across all jurisdictions in Canada for both adult and youth. In addition, this publication reports on community corrections data collected from the special study, as well as data from the Adult Correctional Services Survey, the Key Indicator Report, the Youth Custody and Community Services Survey, and the Alternative Measures Survey. It examines admissions and average counts of adults and youth who were under community supervision, showing trends as far back as 1993/94. Furthermore, data on offender characteristics, such as sex and Aboriginal status are also presented.

    Release date: 2005-09-07

  • Table: 85-224-X20050008649
    Description:

    Persons over the age of 65 represented 13% of the Canadian population compared to 11% in. It is projected that persons age 65 years and over will represent 15% of the population of Canada. Concern for the well-being of seniors is heightened by the fact that this segment of the population is growing faster than any other age cohort. There are numerous implications for Canadian society as a result of this growth including meeting the health needs of an aging population as well as ensuring that seniors are not victims of violent crime either from within or outside of the family.

    Release date: 2005-07-14

  • Table: 85-224-X20050008648
    Description:

    This chapter will focus on the physical and sexual assaults against children and youth (under the age of 18) that were reported to police services. In addition, other forms of child maltreatment and child abuse are presented including the extent to which children and youth witness violence in the home. System responses to the issue of child maltreatment and violence will be examined, using information from the Transition Home and Victim Services Surveys. As well, recent policy developments to address and improve the situation of family violence against children and youth in Canada will be highlighted.

    Release date: 2005-07-14

  • Table: 85-224-X20050008644
    Description:

    Recently, through the General Social Survey (GSS) on Victimization, questions related to spousal violence against women and men were repeated. Results of this survey permit the analysis of how spousal violence has changed in nature and extent over the two cycles of the survey from and, for the first time, provide trends on male spousal violence. As will be highlighted in this chapter, the GSS illustrates that overall spousal violence rates have remained stable, but violence in previous relationships has decreased for both women and men and continues to be more common than in current relationships. In addition, the data continue to show that violence is more prevalent in common-law relationships than in marital unions, and although relatively equal proportions of women and men report some type of spousal violence, women continue to suffer more serious and repeated spousal violence than do men and incur more serious consequences as a result of this violence.

    Release date: 2005-07-14

  • Table: 85-224-X20050008647
    Description:

    This chapter examines homicide-suicide trends involving three populations; spouses, children and youth under the age of 18 and older adults (65 years of age and older). The following analysis use data from the Homicide Survey explores the Homicide narratives to add contextual information.

    Release date: 2005-07-14

  • Table: 85-224-X20050008645
    Description:

    In the past decade, four large-scale victimization surveys have been conducted to obtain national population estimates of stalking. These surveys have been carried out in the United Kingdom, the United States, Australia and Canada. For the first time in Statistics Canada measured stalking through the General Social Survey on Victimization (GSS). The present analysis details the prevalence of stalking in Canada, describing victim characteristics, victim'offender relationships, types of stalking experienced, violent stalking relationships, help-seeking behaviour of stalking victims, emotional consequences of stalking, reasons for reporting or not reporting the stalking to the police, types of charges laid against stalkers, and the use and breach of restraining orders.

    Release date: 2005-07-14

  • Table: 85-224-X20050008646
    Description:

    Using data from the Homicide Survey, the following chapter examines the different circumstances and characteristics of family-related homicides in Canada which occurred. The analysis includes details about spousal homicides, child and youth homicides and family homicides of older persons (65+). This chapter will present data on the characteristics of the accused, the incident and the victim in these homicides.

    Release date: 2005-07-14

  • Table: 85-565-X
    Description:

    In 2004, as part of its General Social Survey program, Statistics Canada conducted a survey on victimization and public perceptions of crime and the justice system. It was the fourth time that the General Social Survey (GSS) had examined victimization - previous surveys were conducted in 1988, 1993, and 1999. The target population was Canadians aged 15 years and older living in the ten provinces.

    This report provides an overview of the main findings from cycle 18 of the General Social Survey on Victimization and makes comparisons with previous survey cycles. The analysis focuses on Canadians' outlook on crime and the criminal justice system, as well as their fear of crime. Variations by province are also presented.

    Release date: 2005-07-07

  • Table: 85-566-X
    Description:

    This report presents an overview of Canadians' outlook on crime and the criminal justice system at both the national and Census Metropolitan Area levels. The information was collected in 2004 through Cycle 18 of the General Social Survey (GSS) on victimization. This survey, which has been previously carried out in 1999, 1993, and 1988, collects information on Canadians' experience of victimization, and public attitudes towards crime, police, courts, prison and parole. The target population of the GSS is all individuals aged 15 and over living in a private household in one of the ten provinces.

    Release date: 2005-07-07

Analysis (11)

Analysis (11) (11 of 11 results)

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20050088970
    Description:

    The federal government and the provincial and territorial governments share the administration of correctional services in Canada, which include custody (sentenced custody, remand and other temporary detention) and community-based sentences (probation, conditional sentences) as well as statutory release and parole supervision. Correctional services agencies at both levels work toward the same goal, that is, the protection of society as well as the rehabilitation of offenders and their safe reintegration into communities as productive members.

    This Juristat reports on data from the Adult Correctional Services Survey for the 2003/04 fiscal year, and shows trends in these data from 1994/95. It examines average counts of adults who have been incarcerated, who were under community supervision on probation, serving a conditional sentence or on conditional release (parole and statutory release). The number of admissions to these programs, the offences leading to the admission, the duration of the incarceration or probation, as well as some offender characteristics, such as age, sex and Aboriginal identity are also described. Furthermore, the cost of correctional services in 2003/04, broken down by type of activity and level of government is examined. The average daily inmate costs from 1994/95 to 2003/04, as well as the number of correctional institutions in Canada in 2003/04 are reported.

    Release date: 2005-12-16

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2005006
    Description:

    This is the first quasi-national Canadian study of the criminal careers of a birth cohort. It uses linked data from the Youth Court Survey and Adult Criminal Court Survey to describe the court careers up to the 22nd birthday of Canadians born in 1979/80. The study includes six provinces - Newfoundland and Labrador, Prince Edward Island, Quebec, Ontario, Saskatchewan, and Alberta - accounting for approximately 78% of the population of Canada.

    Eighteen per 100 members of the cohort were referred to court for a criminal offence allegedly committed before their 22nd birthday. Thirteen were found guilty of at least one offence, and ten received a sentence which put them under the supervision of correctional or probation authorities. The peak age of referral to court is 18 years. On average, between the ages of 12 and 21 inclusive, alleged offenders were referred to court in connection with 3.1 criminal incidents' or 2.4, if administrative offences are excluded. Just over half of alleged offenders had only one incident in their court career. Seventeen percent of alleged offenders were classified as chronic offenders, who were responsible for 58% of all alleged criminal incidents.

    Individuals whose contact with the court system begins later in adolescence tend to be involved in fewer criminal incidents. The lengths of court careers vary widely, but the mean and median lengths are 20 months and 13 months respectively. Age-specific annual rates of alleged offending are similar for accused males and females, and peak at 15 years of age. There is no particular tendency to escalation, de-escalation, or stability in the seriousness of repeated court referrals: all three patterns occur frequently. Thirty-seven percent of individuals with multiple court referrals have adolescent-limited careers (i.e. no incidents after the 18th birthday which resulted in court referral), 43% have adult-onset careers (no incidents before the 18th birthday), and 20% are persistent offenders (with incidents both as youths and as adults). The latter have many more criminal incidents in their careers and are much more likely than the others to have been referred to court for an offence against the person; however, the incidents in their careers are not more serious on average, and they are not more likely to have had an early onset of contact with the court system.

    The file from which these results were derived could support much more detailed analyses of the topics which are touched on by this report, as well as other topics which have not been addressed, such as the timing of incidents during the career, the processing of cases through the courts, the sequence of case outcomes and sentences, and the interactions between sentencing and future offending, including the impact on careers of incapacitation. As additional years of court data become available, future research should follow court careers past the 22nd birthday. This will result in a more complete picture of the court careers of chronic, persistent offenders, as well as a more thorough investigation of the court careers of "adult-onset " offenders, who had no contact with the court system during adolescence.

    Release date: 2005-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20050078803
    Description:

    In 2004, as part of its General Social Survey program, Statistics Canada conducted a survey on victimization and public perceptions of crime and the justice system. It was the fourth time that the General Social Survey (GSS) had examined victimization - previous surveys were conducted in 1999, 1993 and 1988.

    For the 2004 survey, interviews were conducted by telephone with approximately 24,000 people, aged 15 and older, living in the 10 provinces. Respondents were asked about their experiences with criminal victimization. Those respondents who had been victims of a crime in the previous 12 months were asked for detailed information on each incident, including when and where it occurred; whether the incident was reported to the police; and how they were affected by the experience.

    This Juristat explores the overall trends and regional variations of criminal victimization, as well as the individual risk factors associated with victimization. The impacts and consequences of being victimized are discussed, along with the informal and formal sources of support for victims.

    Release date: 2005-11-24

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20050068650
    Description:

    This annual report is an examination of homicide in Canada. Detailed information is presented on the characteristics of homicide incidents (murder, manslaughter and infanticide), victims and accused within the context of both short and long-term trends. Geographical patterns of homicide are examined at the national and provincial/territorial levels, as well as for major metropolitan areas. Other key themes include international comparisons of homicide, gang-related homicides, firearm-related homicides, youth homicide and family (including spousal) homicides. The data are intended to respond to the needs of those who work in the criminal justice system as well as to inform researchers, policy analysts, academics, the media and the public on the nature and extent of homicide in Canada.

    Release date: 2005-10-06

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20050058076
    Description:

    The annual report on crime statistics presents an analysis of the police-reported data in 2004. These data are presented within the context of both short and long term trends. Data are examined at the national, provincial and territorial levels, as well as for major metropolitan areas by type of crime. The report distinguishes between violent crime, property crime, other Criminal Code offences, impaired driving, drug offences and youth crime.

    Release date: 2005-07-21

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2005005
    Description:

    This research paper provides an overview of patterns in crime data between 1962 and 2003, with a particular focus on the decline in recorded crime throughout the 1990s. This paper also explores the statistical relationship between selected crime patterns (homicide, robbery, break and enter and motor vehicle theft) and various macro-level demographic and economic changes. Analysis is based on police-reported crime data from the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey, Consumer Price Index, Labour Force Survey and institution data on the control and sale of alcoholic beverages in Canada.

    In general, bivariate results indicate that throughout the 1990s the greatest gains in reducing crime rates were made in property crimes, especially among young offenders. Significant declines were also noted for robberies and homicides involving firearms as well as homicides overall.

    Multivariate results indicate that, at the macro-level, different types of crime are influenced by different social and economic factors. Specifically, shifts in inflation were found to be associated with changes in the level of all financially motivated crimes examined (robbery, break and enter, motor vehicle theft). Shifts in the age composition of the population, on the other hand, were found to be correlated with shifts in rates of break and enter and were not statistically significant for the other types of crimes studied. Finally, shifts in alcohol consumption and unemployment rates were found to be correlated with shifts in homicide rates.

    Release date: 2005-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 82-003-X20040048042
    Description:

    Trends in rates of death involving firearms are examined from 1979 to 2002. Rates of firearms-related suicide, homicide, and unintentional death are reported over time and by province. Recent rates of gun-related death in Canada's four largest cities -Toronto, Montréal, Vancouver and Calgary -are compared.

    Release date: 2005-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20050047948
    Description:

    This series of reports provides detailed statistics and analysis on a variety of topics and issues concerning Canada's justice system. The annual Juristat, Youth Court Statistics, 2003-2004, summarizes trends from provincial/territorial youth courts across Canada, which provide data to the Youth Court Survey (YCS). In this Juristat, information is presented on the characteristics of cases and accused youth, conviction rates, sentencing and related issues. As well, statistics are presented for the thirteen year period from 1991-1992, the first year for which national data are available for the YCS, to the current year, 2003-2004.

    Release date: 2005-06-24

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20050037946
    Description:

    This Juristat presents a profile of all shelters in Canada that provided residential services to abused women and their children in 2003-2004. Additionally, through the use of a snapshot day survey (April 14, 2004), selected characteristics of residents (i.e., reasons for coming to the shelter, age group, parenting responsibilities, relationship to abuser, involvement of the criminal justice system, etc.) are presented. Data for this Juristat come primarily from the Transition Home Survey (THS), a biennial census of all residential facilities for female victims of domestic violence conducted by the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics as part of the federal government's Family Violence Initiative. Questionnaires are mailed to all shelters known to provide residential services to abused women in every province and territory. Information is collected on the characteristics of the facilities and the services provided during the previous 12 months (April 1, 2003 to March 31, 2004). Cross-sectional comparisons and comparisons using time-series data from the THS Trend File are also included. The THS Trend File contains only those facilities that participated in the survey in each of the following years: 1997/98, 1999/00, 2001/02 and 2003/04.

    Release date: 2005-06-15

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20050028411
    Description:

    This Juristat examines the case histories and correctional outcomes of adults under provincial correctional supervision in Saskatchewan during the years 1999/00 through 2003/04. This is the first report analyzing data from the newly implemented Integrated Correctional Services Survey (ICSS). It provides an analysis of characteristics of persons supervised in correctional services, and a description of their involvement, any re-involvements, as well as a comparative analysis of these characteristics between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal persons. Several cohorts of persons released from supervised correctional activity in Saskatchewan are analyzed regarding their return to correctional services as well as the relationship between these re-involvements and various demographic, case history and criminal justice factors.

    Release date: 2005-06-03

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20050018064
    Description:

    This issue of Juristat presents statistical information on the extent and nature of violent victimization of children and youth in Canada in 2003 as reported to a subset of police services. Rates of victimization are presented for each age and sex. Data describes the different types of assaults perpetrated against children and youth, the weapons used to inflict injury, the injuries sustained and the location and time of the assault relative to various age groups. Other topics included in the report are child pornography, sexual exploitation of children, kidnapping and abduction of children. Data used in this report include police statistics from the Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey, the Homicide Survey and court data from the Adult Criminal Court Survey.

    Release date: 2005-04-20

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Reference (1) (1 result)

  • Technical products: 85-564-X
    Description:

    This objective of this report is to present the status of national data on Aboriginal people who come into contact with the criminal justice system as offenders and victims. The report examines the current and potential collection of an individual's Aboriginal identity through various justice-related surveys at Statistics Canada, the challenges within these surveys to collect these data and provides some insight into the quality of these data. The data and sources are examined within the context of information needs for the justice and social policy sectors, and in relation to the preferred method of measuring Aboriginal Identity at Statistics Canada. Data sources examined include the Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey, the Homicide Survey, the Integrated Criminal Courts Survey, the Adult Corrections Survey, the Youth Custody and Community Services Survey, the Youth Alternative Measures Survey, the Transition Home Survey, the Victim Services Survey and the General Social Survey on Victimization. Finally, the report briefly describes efforts by other countries to improve justice-related information on their indigenous populations.

    Release date: 2005-05-10

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