Statistics by subject – Crime and justice

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All (15) (15 of 15 results)

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20060079521
    Description:

    This Juristat profiles community corrections in five provinces - Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Saskatchewan, and Alberta. The focus of the analysis is the provincial/territorial community correctional services of supervised probation and conditional sentences. Outcome indicators, such as breach of conditions of supervision and re-involvement following release from correctional supervision, are examined in this Juristat.

    Release date: 2006-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20060029275
    Description:

    This article examines involvement with the court system of young Canadians born between April 1979 and March 1980. It identifies how large a proportion of them were referred to court and the type of offence with which they were charged. Using data from the Youth Court Survey and the Adult Criminal Court Survey, it follows them as they moved from youth to young adulthood - that is, from age 12 to 21, inclusive

    Release date: 2006-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2006012
    Description:

    This report, using data from the General Social Survey on victimization, examines the various crime prevention measures employed by Canadians and the factors associated with their use.

    The report finds that many Canadians employ crime prevention techniques such as locking car doors, planning their route with safety in mind and checking the back seat for intruders, on a regular basis. Furthermore, many Canadians used protective strategies such as altering their routine, avoiding certain places, installing burglar alarms and changing their locks to guard against crime, at sometime in their lives. More extreme measures, such as changing their residence or buying a gun were much less likely.

    This report also demonstrates that a number of personal, household, and perceived neighbourhood characteristics are associated with the use of crime prevention measures. Specifically, usage of crime prevention techniques was more common among women, those previously victimized, well-educated individuals and urban-dwellers. Also, those who felt crime rates in their neighbourhood had increased and were higher than rates elsewhere in Canada were most likely to employ crime prevention measures.

    Release date: 2006-11-23

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20060069507
    Description:

    This annual report is an examination of homicide in Canada. Detailed information is presented on the characteristics of homicide incidents (murder, manslaughter and infanticide), victims and accused within the context of both short and long-term trends. Geographical patterns of homicide are examined at the national and provincial/territorial levels, as well as for major metropolitan areas. Other key themes include international comparisons of homicide, gang-related homicides, firearm-related homicides, youth homicide and family (including spousal) homicides. The data are intended to respond to the needs of those who work in the criminal justice system as well as to inform researchers, policy analysts, academics, the media and the public on the nature and extent of homicide in Canada.

    Release date: 2006-11-08

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2006008
    Description:

    This research paper explores the spatial distribution of crime and various social, economic and physical neighbourhood characteristics in the City of Regina. Analysis is based on police-reported crime data from the 1999, 2001, and 2003 Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey (UCR2), the 2001 Census of Population, 1999 and 2003 Small Area and Administrative data from tax filers, and City of Regina zoning and land-use data.

    Release date: 2006-11-02

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2006011
    Description:

    Using recent police-reported and self-reported data, this new report provides a profile of the extent and nature of victimization and offending in Canada's territories.

    The report finds that northern residents experience higher rates of violent victimization and are more likely to be victims of spousal violence than residents in the rest of Canada. Furthermore, police-reported crime rates in the North are much higher than those in the provinces.

    The report also examines particular factors that seem to be associated with higher rates of victimization and offending. All are more common in the North. These factors include: northern residents are younger on average, than residents in the rest of Canada; the territories have higher proportions of lone-parent families and common-law families; they have higher rates of unemployment; and the territories also have higher proportions of Aboriginal residents compared to the provinces.

    Release date: 2006-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20060059295
    Description:

    The federal government and the provincial and territorial governments share the administration of correctional services in Canada, which include custody (sentenced custody, remand and other temporary detention) and community-based sentences (probation, conditional sentences) as well as statutory release and parole supervision. Correctional services agencies at both levels work toward the same goal, that is, the protection of society as well as the rehabilitation of offenders and their safe reintegration into communities as productive members.This Juristat reports on data from the Adult Correctional Services Survey for the 2004/2005 fiscal year, and shows trends in these data from 1995/1996. It examines average counts of adults who have been incarcerated, who were under community supervision on probation, serving a conditional sentence or on conditional release (parole and statutory release). The number of admissions to these programs, the offences leading to the admission, the duration of the incarceration or probation, as well as some offender characteristics, such as age, sex and Aboriginal identity are also described. Furthermore, the cost of correctional services in 2004/2005, broken down by type of activity and level of government is examined. The average daily inmate costs from 1995/1996 to 2004/2005, as well as the number of correctional institutions in Canada in 2004/2005 are reported.

    Release date: 2006-10-11

  • Table: Summary table
    Release date: 2006-08-02

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20060049251
    Description:

    The annual report on crime statistics presents an analysis of the police-reported data in 2005. These data are presented within the context of both short and long term trends. Data are examined at the national, provincial and territorial levels, as well as for major metropolitan areas by type of crime. The report distinguishes between violent crime, property crime, other Criminal Code offences, impaired driving, drug offences and youth crime.

    Release date: 2006-07-20

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2006007
    Description:

    This research paper explores the spatial distribution of crime and various social, economic and physical neighbourhood characteristics on the Island of Montréal. Analysis is based on police-reported crime data from the 2001 Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey, the 2001 Census of Population, and Communauté métropolitaine de Montréal land-use data.

    Release date: 2006-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20060039199
    Description:

    Using data from victimization, police and corrections surveys, this report provides a statistical portrait of the extent and nature of victimization and offending among Aboriginal people in Canada during the past few years.

    The report finds that Aboriginal people are much more likely than non-Aboriginal people to be victims of violent crime and spousal violence. Aboriginal people are also highly overrepresented as offenders charged in police-reported homicide incidents and those admitted into the correctional system. Furthermore, crime rates are notably higher on-reserve compared to crime rates in the rest of Canada.

    The report also examines particular factors which could be related to the high levels of representation in the criminal justice system. These factors include: Aboriginal people are younger on average; their unemployment rates are higher and incomes lower; they have lower levels of educational attainment; they are more likely to live in crowded conditions; they have higher residential mobility; and Aboriginal children are more likely to be members of a lone-parent family.

    Information on Aboriginal peoples fear of crime and their perceptions of the justice system as well as their experiences with discrimination are presented, along with a description of some of the programs and services that have been developed as a response to the specialized needs of Aboriginal people in the criminal justice system.

    Release date: 2006-06-06

  • Technical products: 85-569-X
    Description:

    This feasibility report provides a blueprint for improving data on fraud in Canada through a survey of businesses and through amendments to the Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Survey. Presently, national information on fraud is based on official crime statistics reported by police services to the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey. These data, however, do not reflect the true nature and extent of fraud in Canada due to under-reporting of fraud by individuals and businesses, and due to inconsistencies in the way frauds are counted within the UCR Survey. This feasibility report concludes that a better measurement of fraud in Canada could be obtained through a survey of businesses. The report presents the information priorities of government departments, law enforcement and the private sector with respect to the issue of fraud and makes recommendations on how a survey of businesses could help fulfill these information needs.

    To respond to information priorities, the study recommends surveying the following types of business establishments: banks, payment companies (i.e. credit card and debit card companies), selected retailers, property and casualty insurance carriers, health and disability insurance carriers and selected manufacturers. The report makes recommendations regarding survey methodology and questionnaire content, and provides estimates for timeframes and cost.

    The report also recommends changes to the UCR Survey in order to improve the way in which incidents are counted and to render the data collected more relevant with respect to the information priorities raised by government, law enforcement and the private sector during the feasibility study.

    Release date: 2006-04-11

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20060029082
    Description:

    This Juristat provides an overview of young persons under correctional services and is the first release of the Youth Custody and Community Services Survey (YCCS) since the implementation of the Youth Criminal Justice Act (YCJA), which came into effect on April 1, 2003. Correctional services include pre-trial detention (remand), secure and open custody, and probation, as well as the new YCJA sentencing options, including, deferred custody and supervision, community portion of a custody sentence (CPCS), and the intensive support and supervision program (ISSP).

    This Juristat examines youth correctional data which are drawn from two sources: 1) The Youth Key Indicator Report which measures the number of youth held in custody on an average day and on probation on an average month-end basis. An examination of trends provides an overview of caseload in youth corrections, as well as incarceration and probation rates, and 2) The Youth Custody and Community Services survey collects data on youth admissions to and releases from custody and community services. These data are examined based on key case characteristics such as age, sex, Aboriginal/non-Aboriginal identity, and most serious offence and length of time served. Data are analyzed at the provincial/territorial as well as national levels.

    Release date: 2006-03-28

  • Table: 85-568-X
    Description:

    In 2004, as part of its General Social Survey program, Statistics Canada conducted a survey on victimization and public perceptions of crime and the justice system. It was the fourth time that the General Social Survey (GSS) had examined victimization - previous surveys were conducted in 1988, 1993, and 1999. The target population was Canadians aged 15 years and older living in the ten provinces.

    This survey also included a test collection of telephone survey data in the Northwest Territories, Nunavut and Yukon. This document contains data tables for these territories produced from the sample of this test collection.

    Release date: 2006-03-10

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20060018985
    Description:

    This Juristat presents for the first time a detailed examination of the offences against the administration of justice such as failure to comply with a court order, breach of probation, and failure to appear. It reports on the increasing occurence of these offences in the criminal justice system from 1994/95 to 2003/04.

    Release date: 2006-01-11

Data (2)

Data (2) (2 results)

Analysis (12)

Analysis (12) (12 of 12 results)

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20060079521
    Description:

    This Juristat profiles community corrections in five provinces - Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Saskatchewan, and Alberta. The focus of the analysis is the provincial/territorial community correctional services of supervised probation and conditional sentences. Outcome indicators, such as breach of conditions of supervision and re-involvement following release from correctional supervision, are examined in this Juristat.

    Release date: 2006-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X20060029275
    Description:

    This article examines involvement with the court system of young Canadians born between April 1979 and March 1980. It identifies how large a proportion of them were referred to court and the type of offence with which they were charged. Using data from the Youth Court Survey and the Adult Criminal Court Survey, it follows them as they moved from youth to young adulthood - that is, from age 12 to 21, inclusive

    Release date: 2006-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2006012
    Description:

    This report, using data from the General Social Survey on victimization, examines the various crime prevention measures employed by Canadians and the factors associated with their use.

    The report finds that many Canadians employ crime prevention techniques such as locking car doors, planning their route with safety in mind and checking the back seat for intruders, on a regular basis. Furthermore, many Canadians used protective strategies such as altering their routine, avoiding certain places, installing burglar alarms and changing their locks to guard against crime, at sometime in their lives. More extreme measures, such as changing their residence or buying a gun were much less likely.

    This report also demonstrates that a number of personal, household, and perceived neighbourhood characteristics are associated with the use of crime prevention measures. Specifically, usage of crime prevention techniques was more common among women, those previously victimized, well-educated individuals and urban-dwellers. Also, those who felt crime rates in their neighbourhood had increased and were higher than rates elsewhere in Canada were most likely to employ crime prevention measures.

    Release date: 2006-11-23

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20060069507
    Description:

    This annual report is an examination of homicide in Canada. Detailed information is presented on the characteristics of homicide incidents (murder, manslaughter and infanticide), victims and accused within the context of both short and long-term trends. Geographical patterns of homicide are examined at the national and provincial/territorial levels, as well as for major metropolitan areas. Other key themes include international comparisons of homicide, gang-related homicides, firearm-related homicides, youth homicide and family (including spousal) homicides. The data are intended to respond to the needs of those who work in the criminal justice system as well as to inform researchers, policy analysts, academics, the media and the public on the nature and extent of homicide in Canada.

    Release date: 2006-11-08

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2006008
    Description:

    This research paper explores the spatial distribution of crime and various social, economic and physical neighbourhood characteristics in the City of Regina. Analysis is based on police-reported crime data from the 1999, 2001, and 2003 Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey (UCR2), the 2001 Census of Population, 1999 and 2003 Small Area and Administrative data from tax filers, and City of Regina zoning and land-use data.

    Release date: 2006-11-02

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2006011
    Description:

    Using recent police-reported and self-reported data, this new report provides a profile of the extent and nature of victimization and offending in Canada's territories.

    The report finds that northern residents experience higher rates of violent victimization and are more likely to be victims of spousal violence than residents in the rest of Canada. Furthermore, police-reported crime rates in the North are much higher than those in the provinces.

    The report also examines particular factors that seem to be associated with higher rates of victimization and offending. All are more common in the North. These factors include: northern residents are younger on average, than residents in the rest of Canada; the territories have higher proportions of lone-parent families and common-law families; they have higher rates of unemployment; and the territories also have higher proportions of Aboriginal residents compared to the provinces.

    Release date: 2006-10-30

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20060059295
    Description:

    The federal government and the provincial and territorial governments share the administration of correctional services in Canada, which include custody (sentenced custody, remand and other temporary detention) and community-based sentences (probation, conditional sentences) as well as statutory release and parole supervision. Correctional services agencies at both levels work toward the same goal, that is, the protection of society as well as the rehabilitation of offenders and their safe reintegration into communities as productive members.This Juristat reports on data from the Adult Correctional Services Survey for the 2004/2005 fiscal year, and shows trends in these data from 1995/1996. It examines average counts of adults who have been incarcerated, who were under community supervision on probation, serving a conditional sentence or on conditional release (parole and statutory release). The number of admissions to these programs, the offences leading to the admission, the duration of the incarceration or probation, as well as some offender characteristics, such as age, sex and Aboriginal identity are also described. Furthermore, the cost of correctional services in 2004/2005, broken down by type of activity and level of government is examined. The average daily inmate costs from 1995/1996 to 2004/2005, as well as the number of correctional institutions in Canada in 2004/2005 are reported.

    Release date: 2006-10-11

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20060049251
    Description:

    The annual report on crime statistics presents an analysis of the police-reported data in 2005. These data are presented within the context of both short and long term trends. Data are examined at the national, provincial and territorial levels, as well as for major metropolitan areas by type of crime. The report distinguishes between violent crime, property crime, other Criminal Code offences, impaired driving, drug offences and youth crime.

    Release date: 2006-07-20

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2006007
    Description:

    This research paper explores the spatial distribution of crime and various social, economic and physical neighbourhood characteristics on the Island of Montréal. Analysis is based on police-reported crime data from the 2001 Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey, the 2001 Census of Population, and Communauté métropolitaine de Montréal land-use data.

    Release date: 2006-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20060039199
    Description:

    Using data from victimization, police and corrections surveys, this report provides a statistical portrait of the extent and nature of victimization and offending among Aboriginal people in Canada during the past few years.

    The report finds that Aboriginal people are much more likely than non-Aboriginal people to be victims of violent crime and spousal violence. Aboriginal people are also highly overrepresented as offenders charged in police-reported homicide incidents and those admitted into the correctional system. Furthermore, crime rates are notably higher on-reserve compared to crime rates in the rest of Canada.

    The report also examines particular factors which could be related to the high levels of representation in the criminal justice system. These factors include: Aboriginal people are younger on average; their unemployment rates are higher and incomes lower; they have lower levels of educational attainment; they are more likely to live in crowded conditions; they have higher residential mobility; and Aboriginal children are more likely to be members of a lone-parent family.

    Information on Aboriginal peoples fear of crime and their perceptions of the justice system as well as their experiences with discrimination are presented, along with a description of some of the programs and services that have been developed as a response to the specialized needs of Aboriginal people in the criminal justice system.

    Release date: 2006-06-06

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20060029082
    Description:

    This Juristat provides an overview of young persons under correctional services and is the first release of the Youth Custody and Community Services Survey (YCCS) since the implementation of the Youth Criminal Justice Act (YCJA), which came into effect on April 1, 2003. Correctional services include pre-trial detention (remand), secure and open custody, and probation, as well as the new YCJA sentencing options, including, deferred custody and supervision, community portion of a custody sentence (CPCS), and the intensive support and supervision program (ISSP).

    This Juristat examines youth correctional data which are drawn from two sources: 1) The Youth Key Indicator Report which measures the number of youth held in custody on an average day and on probation on an average month-end basis. An examination of trends provides an overview of caseload in youth corrections, as well as incarceration and probation rates, and 2) The Youth Custody and Community Services survey collects data on youth admissions to and releases from custody and community services. These data are examined based on key case characteristics such as age, sex, Aboriginal/non-Aboriginal identity, and most serious offence and length of time served. Data are analyzed at the provincial/territorial as well as national levels.

    Release date: 2006-03-28

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20060018985
    Description:

    This Juristat presents for the first time a detailed examination of the offences against the administration of justice such as failure to comply with a court order, breach of probation, and failure to appear. It reports on the increasing occurence of these offences in the criminal justice system from 1994/95 to 2003/04.

    Release date: 2006-01-11

Reference (1)

Reference (1) (1 result)

  • Technical products: 85-569-X
    Description:

    This feasibility report provides a blueprint for improving data on fraud in Canada through a survey of businesses and through amendments to the Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Survey. Presently, national information on fraud is based on official crime statistics reported by police services to the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey. These data, however, do not reflect the true nature and extent of fraud in Canada due to under-reporting of fraud by individuals and businesses, and due to inconsistencies in the way frauds are counted within the UCR Survey. This feasibility report concludes that a better measurement of fraud in Canada could be obtained through a survey of businesses. The report presents the information priorities of government departments, law enforcement and the private sector with respect to the issue of fraud and makes recommendations on how a survey of businesses could help fulfill these information needs.

    To respond to information priorities, the study recommends surveying the following types of business establishments: banks, payment companies (i.e. credit card and debit card companies), selected retailers, property and casualty insurance carriers, health and disability insurance carriers and selected manufacturers. The report makes recommendations regarding survey methodology and questionnaire content, and provides estimates for timeframes and cost.

    The report also recommends changes to the UCR Survey in order to improve the way in which incidents are counted and to render the data collected more relevant with respect to the information priorities raised by government, law enforcement and the private sector during the feasibility study.

    Release date: 2006-04-11

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