Statistics by subject – Crime and justice

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All (17) (17 of 17 results)

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2007009
    Description:

    This report examines the development over childhood and adolescence of the recorded criminal activity of two cohorts of Canadians, born in 1987 and 1990. The data are drawn from the Incident-Based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey (UCR2) for 1995 to 2005. During that period, the UCR2 received information on crime and offenders from police services in six provinces, which provided policing services to about half of the population of Canada. This is the first large-scale developmental study of delinquency in Canada based on police-reported data.

    Release date: 2007-11-06

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200700810358
    Description:

    This annual report is an examination of homicide in Canada. Detailed information is presented on the characteristics of homicide incidents (murder, manslaughter and infanticide), victims and accused within the context of both short and long-term trends. Geographical patterns of homicide are examined at the national and provincial/territorial levels, as well as for major metropolitan areas. Other key themes include international comparisons of homicide, gang-related homicides, firearm-related homicides, youth homicide and family (including spousal) homicides. The data are intended to respond to the needs of those who work in the criminal justice system as well as to inform researchers, policy analysts, academics, the media and the public on the nature and extent of homicide in Canada.

    Release date: 2007-10-17

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200700710357
    Description:

    This report is based on data from the 2005/2006 Victim Services Survey and provides a profile of victim service agencies in Canada that responded to the survey, as well as information on the clients they served. In reference to 2005/2006, the report presents data on the types of agencies in Canada, the services offered, staff and volunteers, and criminal injuries compensation applications and awards. Characteristics of clients, such as sex, age grouping and type of victimization, are based on counts of clients served on a snapshot day of April 19, 2006. The 2005/2006 Victim Services Survey was conducted by the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics and was funded by Justice Canada's Policy Centre for Victim Issues. Victim service agencies surveyed include system-based, police-based and court-based agencies, sexual assault centres, other selected community-based agencies, and criminal injuries compensation and other financial benefit programs for victims of crime. The report also contains some information on transition homes and shelters for abused women and their children that was collected through Statistics Canada's 2005/2006 Transition Home Survey.

    Release date: 2007-10-16

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 89M0024X
    Description:

    The International Youth Survey (IYS) is the Canadian portion of the International Self-Report Delinquency Study (ISRD) which examines the behaviour and misbehaviour of students in grades 7 to 9 in about 30 European countries, United States and Canada. The National Crime Prevention Centre of the federal department of Public Safety sponsored the Canadian survey. The city of Toronto was chosen as the most suitable city where Statistics Canada could conduct the survey and on which the analysis of results would focus.

    The survey needed to be representative of each of the three grades (7 to 9) and at the grade level, of both sexes. In April 2006, about 3,200 students in 176 schools completed the IYS.

    Release date: 2007-09-25

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200700610353
    Description:

    This Juristats contains the first highlights of the International Youth Survey (IYS). It is the Canadian version of the International Self-Reported Delinquency Study that was conducted in over 30 countries in 2006. This survey addresses several questions and issues that are closely linked to youth delinquency and will allow for international comparisons on such issues. In Canada, the survey was conducted with the Toronto District School Board and certain private schools. More than 3,200 youth in grades 7 to 9 participated during the spring of 2006.

    The report examines the prevalence of various delinquent behaviours and analyzes acts of violence and acts against property separately. The report also examines risk factors for youth delinquency, such as alcohol and drug use, the quality of parent-youth relationships, parental supervision and delinquent friends. The prevalence of youth victimization is also examined.

    Release date: 2007-09-25

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200700510293
    Description:

    The annual report on crime statistics presents an analysis of the police-reported data in 2006. These data are presented within the context of both short and long term trends. Data are examined at the national, provincial and territorial levels, as well as for major metropolitan areas by type of crime. The report distinguishes between violent crime, property crime, other Criminal Code offences, impaired driving, drug offences and youth crime.

    Release date: 2007-07-18

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20070049645
    Description:

    This Juristat presents a profile of all shelters in Canada that provided residential services to abused women and their children in 2005-2006. Additionally, through the use of a snapshot day survey (April 19, 2006), selected characteristics of residents (i.e., reasons for coming to the shelter, parenting responsibilities, relationship to abuser, repeat stays, etc.) are presented. Data for this Juristat come primarily from the Transition Home Survey (THS), a biennial census of all residential facilities for female victims of domestic violence conducted by the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics as part of the federal government's Family Violence Initiative. Questionnaires are mailed to all shelters known to provide residential services to abused women in every province and territory. The THS collects information on the characteristics of shelter residents on a specific day, as well as the characteristics of facilities during the previous 12 months (April 1, 2005 to March 31, 2006). Comparisons using time-series data from the THS Trend File are also included. The THS Trend File contains only those facilities that participated in each cycle of the survey beginning in 1997-1998.

    Release date: 2007-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20070039643
    Description:

    This Juristat presents a comparative analysis of police-reported crime statistics in large urban, small urban and rural areas. It examines overall crime rates as well as the specific offences of homicide, robbery, break-ins and motor vehicle theft in these three geographic areas. Data on the most serious weapon present in violent crimes and victim-offender relationships are likewise analyzed. The report also features the perception of the residents of large urban, small urban and rural areas regarding their safety from crime and the job being done by the police, as well as precautionary measures taken. The 2005 Uniform Crime Reporting Survey and the 2004 General Social Survey on victimization are used as data sources.

    Release date: 2007-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20070029601
    Description:

    This Juristat provides an overview of young persons under correctional services, in the second year since the introduction of the Youth Criminal Justice Act (YCJA), which came into effect on April 1, 2003. It uses data from the Youth Custody and Community Services Survey (YCCS) and the Integrated Correctional Services Survey (ICSS) to analyze trends within correctional services including, remand (pre-trial detention), sentenced custody, probation, deferred custody and supervision, and the community portion of a custody sentence. This Juristat examines youth correctional data which are drawn from two sources: 1) The Youth Key Indicator Report which measures the number of youth held in custody on an average day and on probation on an average month-end basis. An examination of trends provides an overview of caseload in youth corrections, as well as incarceration and probation rates, and 2) The YCCS survey and the ICSS collect data on youth admissions to and releases from custody and community services. These data are examined based on key case characteristics such as age, sex, Aboriginal/non-Aboriginal identity, most serious offence and length of time served. Data are analyzed at the provincial/territorial as well as national levels.

    Release date: 2007-03-14

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2007014
    Description:

    With the increasing proportion of seniors in Canada, there has been a growing concern about their risk of becoming victims of crime. Using data from self-reported victimization and police-reported surveys, this profile examines the nature and prevalence of violent and property crimes against seniors. The report also examines characteristics of offences committed against seniors, the level of reporting to the police and the proportion of incidents involving weapons and causing injuries to senior victims. Furthermore, information on seniors' fear of crime, the prevalence of spousal abuse and seniors' risk of telemarketing fraud is also presented. According to self-reported and police reported data, seniors' experience the lowest levels of violent and property crimes compared to their younger counterparts. However, seniors may be more vulnerable to telemarketing fraud. Seniors' level of satisfaction with their overall personal safety has improved over the last five years.

    Release date: 2007-03-06

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20070019575
    Description:

    In 2004, as part of its General Social Survey program, Statistics Canada conducted a survey on victimization and public perceptions of crime and the justice system. For the 2004 survey, interviews were conducted by telephone with approximately 24,000 people, aged 15 and older, living in the 10 provinces. Respondents were asked about their experiences with criminal victimization. Those respondents who had been victims of a crime in the previous 12 months were asked for detailed information on each incident, including describing any physical injury sustained, financial losses incurred, emotional/psychological after-effects and/or interruption of daily activities. This Juristat explores how victims are affected by their victimization focusing on the different after-effects associated with violent and non-violent crime as well as by the sex of the victim. The report also details the impact of being a victim of crime on perceptions of personal safety and confidence in the judicial system.

    Release date: 2007-03-01

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2007013
    Description:

    Using recent police-reported and self-reported data, this new report provides a profile of the extent and nature of victimization in the Canadian workplace.

    The General Social Survey (GSS) on victimization captures information on the nature and extent of criminal victimization, including whether an incident occurred at the victim's place of work. This Profile examines these data, provides a detailed look at violent workplace incidents and identifies the risk factors that are related to these incidents. The report also examines the aftermath and consequences of violence in the workplace

    Release date: 2007-02-16

Data (5)

Data (5) (5 of 5 results)

Analysis (11)

Analysis (11) (11 of 11 results)

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2007009
    Description:

    This report examines the development over childhood and adolescence of the recorded criminal activity of two cohorts of Canadians, born in 1987 and 1990. The data are drawn from the Incident-Based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey (UCR2) for 1995 to 2005. During that period, the UCR2 received information on crime and offenders from police services in six provinces, which provided policing services to about half of the population of Canada. This is the first large-scale developmental study of delinquency in Canada based on police-reported data.

    Release date: 2007-11-06

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200700810358
    Description:

    This annual report is an examination of homicide in Canada. Detailed information is presented on the characteristics of homicide incidents (murder, manslaughter and infanticide), victims and accused within the context of both short and long-term trends. Geographical patterns of homicide are examined at the national and provincial/territorial levels, as well as for major metropolitan areas. Other key themes include international comparisons of homicide, gang-related homicides, firearm-related homicides, youth homicide and family (including spousal) homicides. The data are intended to respond to the needs of those who work in the criminal justice system as well as to inform researchers, policy analysts, academics, the media and the public on the nature and extent of homicide in Canada.

    Release date: 2007-10-17

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200700710357
    Description:

    This report is based on data from the 2005/2006 Victim Services Survey and provides a profile of victim service agencies in Canada that responded to the survey, as well as information on the clients they served. In reference to 2005/2006, the report presents data on the types of agencies in Canada, the services offered, staff and volunteers, and criminal injuries compensation applications and awards. Characteristics of clients, such as sex, age grouping and type of victimization, are based on counts of clients served on a snapshot day of April 19, 2006. The 2005/2006 Victim Services Survey was conducted by the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics and was funded by Justice Canada's Policy Centre for Victim Issues. Victim service agencies surveyed include system-based, police-based and court-based agencies, sexual assault centres, other selected community-based agencies, and criminal injuries compensation and other financial benefit programs for victims of crime. The report also contains some information on transition homes and shelters for abused women and their children that was collected through Statistics Canada's 2005/2006 Transition Home Survey.

    Release date: 2007-10-16

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200700610353
    Description:

    This Juristats contains the first highlights of the International Youth Survey (IYS). It is the Canadian version of the International Self-Reported Delinquency Study that was conducted in over 30 countries in 2006. This survey addresses several questions and issues that are closely linked to youth delinquency and will allow for international comparisons on such issues. In Canada, the survey was conducted with the Toronto District School Board and certain private schools. More than 3,200 youth in grades 7 to 9 participated during the spring of 2006.

    The report examines the prevalence of various delinquent behaviours and analyzes acts of violence and acts against property separately. The report also examines risk factors for youth delinquency, such as alcohol and drug use, the quality of parent-youth relationships, parental supervision and delinquent friends. The prevalence of youth victimization is also examined.

    Release date: 2007-09-25

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200700510293
    Description:

    The annual report on crime statistics presents an analysis of the police-reported data in 2006. These data are presented within the context of both short and long term trends. Data are examined at the national, provincial and territorial levels, as well as for major metropolitan areas by type of crime. The report distinguishes between violent crime, property crime, other Criminal Code offences, impaired driving, drug offences and youth crime.

    Release date: 2007-07-18

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20070049645
    Description:

    This Juristat presents a profile of all shelters in Canada that provided residential services to abused women and their children in 2005-2006. Additionally, through the use of a snapshot day survey (April 19, 2006), selected characteristics of residents (i.e., reasons for coming to the shelter, parenting responsibilities, relationship to abuser, repeat stays, etc.) are presented. Data for this Juristat come primarily from the Transition Home Survey (THS), a biennial census of all residential facilities for female victims of domestic violence conducted by the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics as part of the federal government's Family Violence Initiative. Questionnaires are mailed to all shelters known to provide residential services to abused women in every province and territory. The THS collects information on the characteristics of shelter residents on a specific day, as well as the characteristics of facilities during the previous 12 months (April 1, 2005 to March 31, 2006). Comparisons using time-series data from the THS Trend File are also included. The THS Trend File contains only those facilities that participated in each cycle of the survey beginning in 1997-1998.

    Release date: 2007-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20070039643
    Description:

    This Juristat presents a comparative analysis of police-reported crime statistics in large urban, small urban and rural areas. It examines overall crime rates as well as the specific offences of homicide, robbery, break-ins and motor vehicle theft in these three geographic areas. Data on the most serious weapon present in violent crimes and victim-offender relationships are likewise analyzed. The report also features the perception of the residents of large urban, small urban and rural areas regarding their safety from crime and the job being done by the police, as well as precautionary measures taken. The 2005 Uniform Crime Reporting Survey and the 2004 General Social Survey on victimization are used as data sources.

    Release date: 2007-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20070029601
    Description:

    This Juristat provides an overview of young persons under correctional services, in the second year since the introduction of the Youth Criminal Justice Act (YCJA), which came into effect on April 1, 2003. It uses data from the Youth Custody and Community Services Survey (YCCS) and the Integrated Correctional Services Survey (ICSS) to analyze trends within correctional services including, remand (pre-trial detention), sentenced custody, probation, deferred custody and supervision, and the community portion of a custody sentence. This Juristat examines youth correctional data which are drawn from two sources: 1) The Youth Key Indicator Report which measures the number of youth held in custody on an average day and on probation on an average month-end basis. An examination of trends provides an overview of caseload in youth corrections, as well as incarceration and probation rates, and 2) The YCCS survey and the ICSS collect data on youth admissions to and releases from custody and community services. These data are examined based on key case characteristics such as age, sex, Aboriginal/non-Aboriginal identity, most serious offence and length of time served. Data are analyzed at the provincial/territorial as well as national levels.

    Release date: 2007-03-14

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2007014
    Description:

    With the increasing proportion of seniors in Canada, there has been a growing concern about their risk of becoming victims of crime. Using data from self-reported victimization and police-reported surveys, this profile examines the nature and prevalence of violent and property crimes against seniors. The report also examines characteristics of offences committed against seniors, the level of reporting to the police and the proportion of incidents involving weapons and causing injuries to senior victims. Furthermore, information on seniors' fear of crime, the prevalence of spousal abuse and seniors' risk of telemarketing fraud is also presented. According to self-reported and police reported data, seniors' experience the lowest levels of violent and property crimes compared to their younger counterparts. However, seniors may be more vulnerable to telemarketing fraud. Seniors' level of satisfaction with their overall personal safety has improved over the last five years.

    Release date: 2007-03-06

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X20070019575
    Description:

    In 2004, as part of its General Social Survey program, Statistics Canada conducted a survey on victimization and public perceptions of crime and the justice system. For the 2004 survey, interviews were conducted by telephone with approximately 24,000 people, aged 15 and older, living in the 10 provinces. Respondents were asked about their experiences with criminal victimization. Those respondents who had been victims of a crime in the previous 12 months were asked for detailed information on each incident, including describing any physical injury sustained, financial losses incurred, emotional/psychological after-effects and/or interruption of daily activities. This Juristat explores how victims are affected by their victimization focusing on the different after-effects associated with violent and non-violent crime as well as by the sex of the victim. The report also details the impact of being a victim of crime on perceptions of personal safety and confidence in the judicial system.

    Release date: 2007-03-01

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2007013
    Description:

    Using recent police-reported and self-reported data, this new report provides a profile of the extent and nature of victimization in the Canadian workplace.

    The General Social Survey (GSS) on victimization captures information on the nature and extent of criminal victimization, including whether an incident occurred at the victim's place of work. This Profile examines these data, provides a detailed look at violent workplace incidents and identifies the risk factors that are related to these incidents. The report also examines the aftermath and consequences of violence in the workplace

    Release date: 2007-02-16

Reference (1)

Reference (1) (1 result)

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 89M0024X
    Description:

    The International Youth Survey (IYS) is the Canadian portion of the International Self-Report Delinquency Study (ISRD) which examines the behaviour and misbehaviour of students in grades 7 to 9 in about 30 European countries, United States and Canada. The National Crime Prevention Centre of the federal department of Public Safety sponsored the Canadian survey. The city of Toronto was chosen as the most suitable city where Statistics Canada could conduct the survey and on which the analysis of results would focus.

    The survey needed to be representative of each of the three grades (7 to 9) and at the grade level, of both sexes. In April 2006, about 3,200 students in 176 schools completed the IYS.

    Release date: 2007-09-25

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