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All (28) (25 of 28 results)

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200801010745
    Description:

    In 2004/2005, the International Crime Victimization Survey (ICVS) was conducted for a fifth time. The purpose of the ICVS is to provide comparable international information on the nature and extent of crime using a standard questionnaire, survey procedures and techniques. The international survey measures the prevalence of victimization among people aged 16 and over, based on a series of ten offences. It also covers the reporting of criminal victimization incidents to the police, satisfaction with the police response, victim support, fear of crime, use of crime prevention measures and attitudes toward sentences.

    This article is an adaptation of the publication Criminal Victimisation in International Perspective Key findings from the 2004-2005 ICVS and EU ICS. It compares Canada's results with those of other countries who participated in the 2004/2005 survey, focusing on several aspects: victimization prevalence rates, the rates of reporting to the police, and respondents' satisfaction with the police.

    Canada participated in the most recent cycle of the survey conducted by Léger Marketing through the Department of Justice of Canada. It is one of the 30 countries that participated in the 2004/2005 cycle, and one of five industrialized countries to have participated in all cycles of the survey.

    Release date: 2008-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200801010744
    Description:

    This article analyses data on police-reported motor vehicle thefts in Canada. It examines the long and short-term trends at the national, provincial/territorial and census metropolitan levels. The primary motivations for motor vehicle theft, namely "joy-riding" and organized crime, are discussed. Various auto theft prevention strategies, including youth-focused programs and the installation of electronic immobilizers, are highlighted.

    Release date: 2008-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200801010732
    Description:

    This Juristat article describes changes in the characteristics of adults admitted to custody between 2001/2002 and 2006/2007. These characteristics include median age of adults, gender, Aboriginal identity and type of offence. This report also details the short-term and long-term changes in the number of adults admitted to custody, as well as the treatment requirements of adults admitted to custody in 2006/2007.

    Release date: 2008-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2008019
    Description:

    Since only a small proportion of sexual offences are formally documented, the prevalence of sexual assault in Canada has been difficult to quantify. Using data from the 1999 and 2004 General Social Surveys (GSS) on victimization and police-reported data derived from the aggregate Uniform Crime Reporting Survey (UCR) and the incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey (UCR2), the prevalence and nature of sexual assault in Canada is examined. Specifically, this report examines rates of sexual victimization; characteristics of victims and offenders; rates of police reporting; reasons for not reporting to police; the emotional effects of sexual victimization; as well as fear of crime and the use of precautionary measures by victims of sexual assault.

    Release date: 2008-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2008018
    Description:

    Using data from the 2006 Census of Population and self-reported data from the 2004 General Social Survey (GSS) on victimization, this profile examines certain socio-demographic and economic characteristics of immigrants in Canada followed by an analysis of the rates and characteristics of violent crimes involving immigrant victims. It also provides information on immigrants perceptions of safety, of the criminal justice system and of discrimination.

    Release date: 2008-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200800910671
    Description:

    This annual report is an examination of homicide in Canada. Detailed information is presented on the characteristics of homicide incidents (murder, manslaughter and infanticide), victims and accused within the context of both short and long-term trends. Geographical patterns of homicide are examined at the national and provincial/territorial levels, as well as for major metropolitan areas. Other key themes include international comparisons of homicide, gang-related homicides, firearm-related homicides, youth homicide and family (including spousal) homicides. The data are intended to respond to the needs of those who work in the criminal justice system as well as to inform researchers, policy analysts, academics, the media and the public on the nature and extent of homicide in Canada.

    Release date: 2008-10-23

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200800910706
    Description:

    This Juristat article discusses changes in sentencing patterns which have occurred while the numbers of adults held in remand (pre-trial detention) and the length of remand stays have increased. The analysis discusses data from the adult criminal court system for the period of 1996/1997 to 2006/2007 and the adult correctional system for the period of 1996/1997 to 2005/2006.

    Release date: 2008-10-23

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2008015
    Description:

    This paper summarizes the major trends in the series on the spatial analysis of crime conducted by the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics (CCJS) using geographic information system technology in Canadian cities. The main purpose of this analytical series was to explore the relationships between the distribution of crime and the demographic, socio economic and functional characteristics of neighbourhoods. Questions addressed include: How are police reported criminal incidents distributed across city neighbourhoods? Is the crime rate in a neighbourhood associated with factors that are specific to that neighbourhood, such as its demographic, socio-economic, housing and land use characteristics? Is the crime rate in a neighbourhood influenced by nearby neighbourhoods? These questions were explored using data from the 2001 Census of Population, the Incident-Based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey (UCR2), and land use data provided by the various cities.

    Release date: 2008-10-07

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2008014
    Description:

    This research paper explores youth delinquency using data from the International Youth Survey as self-reported by Toronto youth in 2006. In particular, the study examines how the associations between youth delinquency and age, sex, family composition and generational status are affected by factors related to school, victimization and family and friends. Detailed findings are presented for both property and violent delinquency.

    Release date: 2008-09-16

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2008013
    Description:

    The purpose of this research paper was to examine whether the chances of experiencing fear of crime varied across Canadian urban neighbourhoods, and whether factors associated with individuals and their neighbourhoods explained this variation. In addition, the study aimed to understand how Canadians' perceptions of neighbourhood crime and disorder influenced their chances of experiencing fear. Analyses were based on data from the 2004 General Social Survey (GSS) on Victimization and the 2001 Census. Multilevel regression modelling techniques were employed in order to address the statistical complications that arise when individuals are clustered within larger units such as neighbourhoods. The results showed that while the characteristics and perceptions of individuals were most important in explaining differences in fear among urban Canadians; a statistically significant portion of the variation in fear was attributable to the neighbourhood environment.

    Release date: 2008-07-30

  • Articles and reports: 89-630-X200800110661
    Description:

    Until 1993, police-reported statistics were the only national source of information on the nature and extent of spousal violence in Canada. However, it was generally recognized that relying on these data was limited because they only include incidents that come to the attention of the police. And given the 'hidden' nature of these incidents, spousal violence is an offence that is often not reported to the authorities

    Release date: 2008-07-24

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200800810655
    Description:

    This Juristat provides an overview of young persons under correctional services, in the third year since the introduction of the Youth Criminal Justice Act (YCJA), which came into effect on April 1, 2003. It uses data from the Youth Custody and Community Services (YCCS) Survey and the Integrated Correctional Services Survey (ICSS) to analyze trends within correctional services including, sentenced custody, remand (pre-trial detention), probation, the community portion of a custody sentence, and deferred custody and supervision order sentence.

    This Juristat examines youth correctional data which are drawn from two sources: 1) The Youth Key Indicator Report which measures the number of youth held in custody on an average day and on probation on an average month-end basis. An examination of trends provides an overview of caseload in youth corrections, as well as incarceration and probation rates, and 2) The YCCS survey and the ICSS collect data on youth admissions to and releases from custody and community services. These data are examined based on key case characteristics such as age, sex, Aboriginal/non-Aboriginal identity, most serious offence and length of time served. Data are analyzed at the provincial/territorial as well as national levels.

    Release date: 2008-07-21

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200800710658
    Description:

    The annual report on crime statistics presents an analysis of the police-reported data in 2007. These data are presented within the context of both short and long term trends. Data are examined at the national, provincial and territorial levels, as well as for major metropolitan areas by type of crime. The report distinguishes between violent crime, property crime, other Criminal Code offences, impaired driving, drug offences and youth crime.

    Release date: 2008-07-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200800210621
    Description:

    "Signs of crime," which criminologists often call incivility, range from evidence of drug dealing and drug use to garbage littering the neighbourhood. When these perceptions of incivility reach levels of being considered a problem by residents, they can disrupt the community as a whole and lead to feelings of insecurity. This article will examine perceptions of incivility problems within some of Canada's census metropolitan areas. Then, it will look at patterns of perceptions of incivility problems by neighbourhood types.

    Release date: 2008-07-15

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2008012
    Description:

    This research paper focuses on the spatial analysis of crime and neighbourhood characteristics in Saskatoon. Analysis is based on police-reported crime data from the 2001 Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey and the 2001 Census of Population.

    Release date: 2008-07-03

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2008011
    Description:

    This research paper explores the spatial distribution of youth crime and various social, economic and physical neighbourhood characteristics on the Island of Montréal. Analysis is based on police-reported crime data from the 2001 Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey, the 2001 Census of Population, and the Communauté métropolitaine de Montréal land-use data.

    Release date: 2008-06-12

  • Articles and reports: 89-630-X200800110643
    Description:

    In 2004, as part of its General Social Survey program, Statistics Canada conducted a survey on victimization. This survey collected information on the extent and nature of self-reported criminal victimization, the impact and consequences of crime to the victim, reporting to the police and the use of informal and formal services. Similar surveys on victimization were conducted in 1999, 1993 and 1988.

    Release date: 2008-06-12

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2008017
    Description:

    This report examines the nature and extent of hate crime in Canada. Two complementary types of data are used: police-reported data drawn from the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey and the Hate Crime Supplemental Survey; and, self-reported data obtained from the General Social Survey on victimization. Key topics include motivations for hate crime (e.g. race/ethnicity, religion, and sexual orientation), types of offences, geographical comparisons, accused and victim characteristics, consequences of hate crime and international comparisons. The report is intended to respond to the needs of those who work in the criminal justice system as well as to inform researchers, policy analysts, academics, the media and the general public.

    Release date: 2008-06-09

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200800610593
    Description:

    The federal government and the provincial and territorial governments share the administration of correctional services in Canada, which include custody (sentenced custody, remand and other temporary detention) and community-based sentences (probation, conditional sentences) as well as statutory release and parole supervision. Correctional services agencies at both levels work toward the same goal, that is, the protection of society as well as the rehabilitation of offenders and their safe reintegration into communities as productive members.

    This Juristat reports on data from the Adult Correctional Services Survey and the Resources, Expenditures and Personnel (REP) Survey for the 2005/2006 fiscal year, and shows trends in these data from 1996/1997. It examines the number of admissions of adults to custody and community supervision, such as probation, conditional sentence and conditional release (parole and statutory release). The offences leading to the admission, the duration of the incarceration or probation, as well as some offender characteristics, such as age, sex and Aboriginal identity are also described. Furthermore, the cost of correctional services in 2005/2006, broken down by type of activity and level of government is examined. The average daily inmate costs from 1996/1997 to 2005/2006, as well as the number of correctional institutions in Canada in 2005/2006 are reported.

    Release date: 2008-06-06

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200800410568
    Description:

    This series of reports provides detailed statistics and analysis on a variety of topics and issues concerning Canada's justice system. The annual Juristat, Youth Court Statistics, 2006/2007, summarizes trends from provincial/territorial youth courts across Canada, which provide data to the Integrated Criminal Court Survey. In this Juristat, information is presented on the characteristics of cases and accused youth, sentencing and related issues.

    Release date: 2008-05-20

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200800510567
    Description:

    This series of reports provides detailed statistics and analysis on a variety of topics and issues concerning Canada's justice system. The annual Juristat, Adult Criminal Court Statistics, 2006/2007, summarizes trends from provincial/territorial adult criminal courts across Canada, which provided data to the Integrated Criminal Court Survey for the 2006/2007 fiscal year. In this Juristat, information is presented on the characteristics of cases and accused persons, the number of appearances, percentage of guilty cases, sentencing trends and related issues. As well, statistics are presented for a five-year period (2002/2003 through 2006/2007).

    Release date: 2008-05-20

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200800310566
    Description:

    This report analyzes police-reported data on crimes committed by youth aged 12 to 17 in Canada in 2006. An examination of trends in youth crime since the 1991 peak as well as more recent trends with particular reference to the period following the implementation of the Youth Criminal Justice Act (YCJA) in 2003 is also presented.

    The report distinguishes between violent crime, property crime, 'other' Criminal Code offences and drug-related offences. Changes in the use of formal charges versus alternate means to handle youth accused of a crime following the introduction of the YCJA are also examined. Other topics discussed include youth crimes occurring at school, the presence of weapons in youth crime, and changes to youth court caseloads and youth correctional services after the implementation of the YCJA. Data from the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey (UCR) are presented within the context of both short and long term trends and at the national, provincial and territorial levels. The data are intended to respond to the needs of those who work in the criminal justice system as well as to inform researchers, policy analysts, academics, the media and the public on the nature and extent of youth crime in Canada.

    Release date: 2008-05-16

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2008010
    Description:

    This research paper explores the spatial distribution of crime and various social, economic and physical neighbourhood characteristics in Edmonton, Halifax and Thunder Bay. Analysis is based on police-reported crime data from the 2001 Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey, the 2001 Census of Population, and Halifax and Thunder Bay land-use data.

    Release date: 2008-03-26

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2008016
    Description:

    Until recently, there were no national data on the extent to which gays, lesbians and bisexuals were victims of violent crime and discrimination, nor was there any national information about their fear of crime or their perceptions of the criminal justice system.

    Using the GSS self-reported data, this new report provides a profile of the extent to which gays, lesbians and bisexuals were victims of violent crime and spousal violence. It also provides national information about their perception of discrimination, their fear of crime and their perception of the criminal justice system.

    Release date: 2008-02-28

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200800210518
    Description:

    This report is an examination of the use of firearms to commit violent crime in Canada. Detailed information is presented on the incidence and characteristics of overall firearm-related violent crime as well as among major violent crime categories, such as homicide, attempted murder, robbery, forcible confinement and assault. Geographic trends in firearm-related violent crime are analyzed at the national, provincial/territorial and census metropolitan area levels. Comparisons in firearm-related homicide between Canada and other select countries are also presented. Other key topics include the involvement of youth (12 to 17 years) in firearm-related violent crime and differences between court processing and sentencing outcomes for firearm and non-firearm violent cases. These data are intended to inform researchers, the media and the public on the nature and extent of firearm-related violent crime in Canada.

    Release date: 2008-02-20

Data (1)

Data (1) (1 result)

Analysis (27)

Analysis (27) (25 of 27 results)

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200801010745
    Description:

    In 2004/2005, the International Crime Victimization Survey (ICVS) was conducted for a fifth time. The purpose of the ICVS is to provide comparable international information on the nature and extent of crime using a standard questionnaire, survey procedures and techniques. The international survey measures the prevalence of victimization among people aged 16 and over, based on a series of ten offences. It also covers the reporting of criminal victimization incidents to the police, satisfaction with the police response, victim support, fear of crime, use of crime prevention measures and attitudes toward sentences.

    This article is an adaptation of the publication Criminal Victimisation in International Perspective Key findings from the 2004-2005 ICVS and EU ICS. It compares Canada's results with those of other countries who participated in the 2004/2005 survey, focusing on several aspects: victimization prevalence rates, the rates of reporting to the police, and respondents' satisfaction with the police.

    Canada participated in the most recent cycle of the survey conducted by Léger Marketing through the Department of Justice of Canada. It is one of the 30 countries that participated in the 2004/2005 cycle, and one of five industrialized countries to have participated in all cycles of the survey.

    Release date: 2008-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200801010744
    Description:

    This article analyses data on police-reported motor vehicle thefts in Canada. It examines the long and short-term trends at the national, provincial/territorial and census metropolitan levels. The primary motivations for motor vehicle theft, namely "joy-riding" and organized crime, are discussed. Various auto theft prevention strategies, including youth-focused programs and the installation of electronic immobilizers, are highlighted.

    Release date: 2008-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200801010732
    Description:

    This Juristat article describes changes in the characteristics of adults admitted to custody between 2001/2002 and 2006/2007. These characteristics include median age of adults, gender, Aboriginal identity and type of offence. This report also details the short-term and long-term changes in the number of adults admitted to custody, as well as the treatment requirements of adults admitted to custody in 2006/2007.

    Release date: 2008-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2008019
    Description:

    Since only a small proportion of sexual offences are formally documented, the prevalence of sexual assault in Canada has been difficult to quantify. Using data from the 1999 and 2004 General Social Surveys (GSS) on victimization and police-reported data derived from the aggregate Uniform Crime Reporting Survey (UCR) and the incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey (UCR2), the prevalence and nature of sexual assault in Canada is examined. Specifically, this report examines rates of sexual victimization; characteristics of victims and offenders; rates of police reporting; reasons for not reporting to police; the emotional effects of sexual victimization; as well as fear of crime and the use of precautionary measures by victims of sexual assault.

    Release date: 2008-12-09

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2008018
    Description:

    Using data from the 2006 Census of Population and self-reported data from the 2004 General Social Survey (GSS) on victimization, this profile examines certain socio-demographic and economic characteristics of immigrants in Canada followed by an analysis of the rates and characteristics of violent crimes involving immigrant victims. It also provides information on immigrants perceptions of safety, of the criminal justice system and of discrimination.

    Release date: 2008-12-03

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200800910671
    Description:

    This annual report is an examination of homicide in Canada. Detailed information is presented on the characteristics of homicide incidents (murder, manslaughter and infanticide), victims and accused within the context of both short and long-term trends. Geographical patterns of homicide are examined at the national and provincial/territorial levels, as well as for major metropolitan areas. Other key themes include international comparisons of homicide, gang-related homicides, firearm-related homicides, youth homicide and family (including spousal) homicides. The data are intended to respond to the needs of those who work in the criminal justice system as well as to inform researchers, policy analysts, academics, the media and the public on the nature and extent of homicide in Canada.

    Release date: 2008-10-23

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200800910706
    Description:

    This Juristat article discusses changes in sentencing patterns which have occurred while the numbers of adults held in remand (pre-trial detention) and the length of remand stays have increased. The analysis discusses data from the adult criminal court system for the period of 1996/1997 to 2006/2007 and the adult correctional system for the period of 1996/1997 to 2005/2006.

    Release date: 2008-10-23

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2008015
    Description:

    This paper summarizes the major trends in the series on the spatial analysis of crime conducted by the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics (CCJS) using geographic information system technology in Canadian cities. The main purpose of this analytical series was to explore the relationships between the distribution of crime and the demographic, socio economic and functional characteristics of neighbourhoods. Questions addressed include: How are police reported criminal incidents distributed across city neighbourhoods? Is the crime rate in a neighbourhood associated with factors that are specific to that neighbourhood, such as its demographic, socio-economic, housing and land use characteristics? Is the crime rate in a neighbourhood influenced by nearby neighbourhoods? These questions were explored using data from the 2001 Census of Population, the Incident-Based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey (UCR2), and land use data provided by the various cities.

    Release date: 2008-10-07

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2008014
    Description:

    This research paper explores youth delinquency using data from the International Youth Survey as self-reported by Toronto youth in 2006. In particular, the study examines how the associations between youth delinquency and age, sex, family composition and generational status are affected by factors related to school, victimization and family and friends. Detailed findings are presented for both property and violent delinquency.

    Release date: 2008-09-16

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2008013
    Description:

    The purpose of this research paper was to examine whether the chances of experiencing fear of crime varied across Canadian urban neighbourhoods, and whether factors associated with individuals and their neighbourhoods explained this variation. In addition, the study aimed to understand how Canadians' perceptions of neighbourhood crime and disorder influenced their chances of experiencing fear. Analyses were based on data from the 2004 General Social Survey (GSS) on Victimization and the 2001 Census. Multilevel regression modelling techniques were employed in order to address the statistical complications that arise when individuals are clustered within larger units such as neighbourhoods. The results showed that while the characteristics and perceptions of individuals were most important in explaining differences in fear among urban Canadians; a statistically significant portion of the variation in fear was attributable to the neighbourhood environment.

    Release date: 2008-07-30

  • Articles and reports: 89-630-X200800110661
    Description:

    Until 1993, police-reported statistics were the only national source of information on the nature and extent of spousal violence in Canada. However, it was generally recognized that relying on these data was limited because they only include incidents that come to the attention of the police. And given the 'hidden' nature of these incidents, spousal violence is an offence that is often not reported to the authorities

    Release date: 2008-07-24

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200800810655
    Description:

    This Juristat provides an overview of young persons under correctional services, in the third year since the introduction of the Youth Criminal Justice Act (YCJA), which came into effect on April 1, 2003. It uses data from the Youth Custody and Community Services (YCCS) Survey and the Integrated Correctional Services Survey (ICSS) to analyze trends within correctional services including, sentenced custody, remand (pre-trial detention), probation, the community portion of a custody sentence, and deferred custody and supervision order sentence.

    This Juristat examines youth correctional data which are drawn from two sources: 1) The Youth Key Indicator Report which measures the number of youth held in custody on an average day and on probation on an average month-end basis. An examination of trends provides an overview of caseload in youth corrections, as well as incarceration and probation rates, and 2) The YCCS survey and the ICSS collect data on youth admissions to and releases from custody and community services. These data are examined based on key case characteristics such as age, sex, Aboriginal/non-Aboriginal identity, most serious offence and length of time served. Data are analyzed at the provincial/territorial as well as national levels.

    Release date: 2008-07-21

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200800710658
    Description:

    The annual report on crime statistics presents an analysis of the police-reported data in 2007. These data are presented within the context of both short and long term trends. Data are examined at the national, provincial and territorial levels, as well as for major metropolitan areas by type of crime. The report distinguishes between violent crime, property crime, other Criminal Code offences, impaired driving, drug offences and youth crime.

    Release date: 2008-07-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200800210621
    Description:

    "Signs of crime," which criminologists often call incivility, range from evidence of drug dealing and drug use to garbage littering the neighbourhood. When these perceptions of incivility reach levels of being considered a problem by residents, they can disrupt the community as a whole and lead to feelings of insecurity. This article will examine perceptions of incivility problems within some of Canada's census metropolitan areas. Then, it will look at patterns of perceptions of incivility problems by neighbourhood types.

    Release date: 2008-07-15

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2008012
    Description:

    This research paper focuses on the spatial analysis of crime and neighbourhood characteristics in Saskatoon. Analysis is based on police-reported crime data from the 2001 Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey and the 2001 Census of Population.

    Release date: 2008-07-03

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2008011
    Description:

    This research paper explores the spatial distribution of youth crime and various social, economic and physical neighbourhood characteristics on the Island of Montréal. Analysis is based on police-reported crime data from the 2001 Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey, the 2001 Census of Population, and the Communauté métropolitaine de Montréal land-use data.

    Release date: 2008-06-12

  • Articles and reports: 89-630-X200800110643
    Description:

    In 2004, as part of its General Social Survey program, Statistics Canada conducted a survey on victimization. This survey collected information on the extent and nature of self-reported criminal victimization, the impact and consequences of crime to the victim, reporting to the police and the use of informal and formal services. Similar surveys on victimization were conducted in 1999, 1993 and 1988.

    Release date: 2008-06-12

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2008017
    Description:

    This report examines the nature and extent of hate crime in Canada. Two complementary types of data are used: police-reported data drawn from the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey and the Hate Crime Supplemental Survey; and, self-reported data obtained from the General Social Survey on victimization. Key topics include motivations for hate crime (e.g. race/ethnicity, religion, and sexual orientation), types of offences, geographical comparisons, accused and victim characteristics, consequences of hate crime and international comparisons. The report is intended to respond to the needs of those who work in the criminal justice system as well as to inform researchers, policy analysts, academics, the media and the general public.

    Release date: 2008-06-09

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200800610593
    Description:

    The federal government and the provincial and territorial governments share the administration of correctional services in Canada, which include custody (sentenced custody, remand and other temporary detention) and community-based sentences (probation, conditional sentences) as well as statutory release and parole supervision. Correctional services agencies at both levels work toward the same goal, that is, the protection of society as well as the rehabilitation of offenders and their safe reintegration into communities as productive members.

    This Juristat reports on data from the Adult Correctional Services Survey and the Resources, Expenditures and Personnel (REP) Survey for the 2005/2006 fiscal year, and shows trends in these data from 1996/1997. It examines the number of admissions of adults to custody and community supervision, such as probation, conditional sentence and conditional release (parole and statutory release). The offences leading to the admission, the duration of the incarceration or probation, as well as some offender characteristics, such as age, sex and Aboriginal identity are also described. Furthermore, the cost of correctional services in 2005/2006, broken down by type of activity and level of government is examined. The average daily inmate costs from 1996/1997 to 2005/2006, as well as the number of correctional institutions in Canada in 2005/2006 are reported.

    Release date: 2008-06-06

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200800410568
    Description:

    This series of reports provides detailed statistics and analysis on a variety of topics and issues concerning Canada's justice system. The annual Juristat, Youth Court Statistics, 2006/2007, summarizes trends from provincial/territorial youth courts across Canada, which provide data to the Integrated Criminal Court Survey. In this Juristat, information is presented on the characteristics of cases and accused youth, sentencing and related issues.

    Release date: 2008-05-20

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200800510567
    Description:

    This series of reports provides detailed statistics and analysis on a variety of topics and issues concerning Canada's justice system. The annual Juristat, Adult Criminal Court Statistics, 2006/2007, summarizes trends from provincial/territorial adult criminal courts across Canada, which provided data to the Integrated Criminal Court Survey for the 2006/2007 fiscal year. In this Juristat, information is presented on the characteristics of cases and accused persons, the number of appearances, percentage of guilty cases, sentencing trends and related issues. As well, statistics are presented for a five-year period (2002/2003 through 2006/2007).

    Release date: 2008-05-20

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200800310566
    Description:

    This report analyzes police-reported data on crimes committed by youth aged 12 to 17 in Canada in 2006. An examination of trends in youth crime since the 1991 peak as well as more recent trends with particular reference to the period following the implementation of the Youth Criminal Justice Act (YCJA) in 2003 is also presented.

    The report distinguishes between violent crime, property crime, 'other' Criminal Code offences and drug-related offences. Changes in the use of formal charges versus alternate means to handle youth accused of a crime following the introduction of the YCJA are also examined. Other topics discussed include youth crimes occurring at school, the presence of weapons in youth crime, and changes to youth court caseloads and youth correctional services after the implementation of the YCJA. Data from the Uniform Crime Reporting Survey (UCR) are presented within the context of both short and long term trends and at the national, provincial and territorial levels. The data are intended to respond to the needs of those who work in the criminal justice system as well as to inform researchers, policy analysts, academics, the media and the public on the nature and extent of youth crime in Canada.

    Release date: 2008-05-16

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2008010
    Description:

    This research paper explores the spatial distribution of crime and various social, economic and physical neighbourhood characteristics in Edmonton, Halifax and Thunder Bay. Analysis is based on police-reported crime data from the 2001 Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey, the 2001 Census of Population, and Halifax and Thunder Bay land-use data.

    Release date: 2008-03-26

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2008016
    Description:

    Until recently, there were no national data on the extent to which gays, lesbians and bisexuals were victims of violent crime and discrimination, nor was there any national information about their fear of crime or their perceptions of the criminal justice system.

    Using the GSS self-reported data, this new report provides a profile of the extent to which gays, lesbians and bisexuals were victims of violent crime and spousal violence. It also provides national information about their perception of discrimination, their fear of crime and their perception of the criminal justice system.

    Release date: 2008-02-28

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200800210518
    Description:

    This report is an examination of the use of firearms to commit violent crime in Canada. Detailed information is presented on the incidence and characteristics of overall firearm-related violent crime as well as among major violent crime categories, such as homicide, attempted murder, robbery, forcible confinement and assault. Geographic trends in firearm-related violent crime are analyzed at the national, provincial/territorial and census metropolitan area levels. Comparisons in firearm-related homicide between Canada and other select countries are also presented. Other key topics include the involvement of youth (12 to 17 years) in firearm-related violent crime and differences between court processing and sentencing outcomes for firearm and non-firearm violent cases. These data are intended to inform researchers, the media and the public on the nature and extent of firearm-related violent crime in Canada.

    Release date: 2008-02-20

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