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All (19)

All (19) (19 of 19 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 85-571-X
    Description:

    This report provides an overview of the first available data on business fraud in Canada focusing on businesses in the retail, banking and insurance sectors. Data used in this report are from the Survey of Fraud against Businesses, 2007-2008. The Survey of Fraud against Businesses provides national-level data on the prevalence and types of fraud experienced, how businesses respond to incidents of fraud, the monetary and non-monetary costs of fraud and fraud detection and prevention practices.

    Release date: 2009-12-10

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200900410929
    Description:

    This annual report is an examination of homicide in Canada. Detailed information is presented on the characteristics of homicide incidents (murder, manslaughter and infanticide), victims and accused within the context of both short and long-term trends. Geographical patterns of homicide are examined at the national and provincial/territorial levels, as well as for major metropolitan areas. Other key themes include international comparisons of homicide, gang-related homicides, firearm-related homicides, youth homicide and family (including spousal) homicides. The data are intended to respond to the needs of those who work in the criminal justice system as well as to inform researchers, policy analysts, academics, the media and the public on the nature and extent of homicide in Canada.

    Release date: 2009-10-28

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200900410932
    Description:

    This report is based on data from the 2007/2008 Victim Services Survey and provides a profile of victim service agencies in Canada that responded to the survey, as well as information on the clients they served. In reference to 2007/2008, the report presents data on the types of agencies in Canada, the services offered, staff and volunteers, and criminal injuries compensation applications and awards. Characteristics of clients, such as sex, age grouping and type of victimization, are based on counts of clients served on a snapshot day of May 28, 2008. The 2007/2008 Victim Services Survey was conducted by the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics and was funded by Justice Canada's Policy Centre for Victim Issues. Victim service agencies surveyed include system-based, police-based and court-based agencies, sexual assault centres, other selected community-based agencies, and criminal injuries compensation and other financial benefit programs for victims of crime.

    Release date: 2009-10-28

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200900410930
    Description:

    This article examines the incidence and nature of three types of police-reported serious assaults in Canada: assault with a weapon or causing bodily harm, aggravated assault and assault against peace officers (including police). The characteristics of these offences are presented and the long and short-terms trends are discussed at the provincial and census metropolitan levels. Adult and youth court data are also utilized to analyze the decisions and sentencing outcomes for serious assault cases.

    Release date: 2009-10-28

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2009018
    Description:

    This research paper focuses on the spatial analysis of crime and neighbourhood characteristics in Toronto. Analysis is based on police-reported crime data from the 2006 Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey and the 2006 Census of Population.

    Release date: 2009-09-24

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2009017
    Description:

    This study examined the influence of school, neighbourhood and student characteristics on the likelihood of students committing violent delinquency. Based on data from the International Youth Survey (2006), findings indicated that there was significant variation in violent delinquency across Toronto schools. In part, this variation was explained by the school climate, or the perceived atmosphere in the school. In particular, a higher level of school capital (positive feeling toward the school) reduced students' chances of committing violent behaviour over and above any of their own risk factors. In contrast, the findings did not support the contention that the level of crime and/or socioeconomic disadvantage in the neighbourhoods surrounding schools had an influence on students' violent behaviour.

    Release date: 2009-09-15

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200900310903
    Description:

    This Juristat article examines the influence of age, education and employment status on the incarceration rates for Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal adults in custody in selected jurisdictions on Census day, meaning May 16 2006. Information on the types of rehabilitative treatments needs of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal offenders for two jurisdictions, Saskatchewan and the Correctional Service of Canada, is also provided. In addition, this article highlights the changes in the number of adults admitted to custody and community supervision from 2006/2007 to 2007/2008 and the characteristics of these admissions, including age, sex and Aboriginal identity.

    Release date: 2009-07-21

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200900310902
    Description:

    This report presents information on the short and long-term trends in overall, violent and non-violent crime at the national, provincial/territorial and census metropolitan area levels. For the first time, this report includes information on both the volume and the severity of police-reported crime in Canada.

    Release date: 2009-07-21

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2009021
    Description:

    According to the 2006 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS), over 4.4 million Canadians, 14% of the population, reported at least one physical or mental condition limiting them in their daily activities. Moreover, with an ageing population, that number is expected to grow in the coming years. It is now all the more important to get an accurate picture of criminal victimization of persons with disabilities in Canada.

    Based essentially on 2004 General Social Survey (GSS) data, this profile presents an analysis of the links between criminal victimization and activity limitations, and certain other health factors. In particular, it analyzes characteristics of incidents, victims and their perpetrators. Finally, the perceptions of persons with activity limitations of crime and the justice system are discussed.

    Release date: 2009-05-26

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200900210846
    Description:

    This Juristat provides an overview of young persons under correctional services, in the fifth year since the introduction of the Youth Criminal Justice Act (YCJA), which came into effect on April 1, 2003. It uses data from the Youth Custody and Community Services (YCCS) Survey and the Integrated Correctional Services Survey (ICSS) to analyze trends in admissions to and releases from correctional services including, sentenced custody, remand (pre-trial detention), probation, the community portion of a custody sentence, and deferred custody and supervision order sentence. These data are examined based on key case characteristics such as age, sex, Aboriginal/non-Aboriginal identity, most serious offence and length of time served. Data are analyzed at the provincial/territorial as well as national levels.

    Release date: 2009-05-13

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200900210847
    Description:

    This article analyses data on the incidence and nature of police-reported drug offences in Canada. It examines the long and short-term trends in possession, trafficking, production, importing and exporting of cannabis, cocaine, heroin and "other" drugs, including methamphetamine (crystal meth) and ecstasy. Key issues include geographical comparisons, involvement of youth (12 to 17 years) accused of drug offences, and decisions and sentencing outcomes for those charged with drug offences. These data are intended to inform researchers, the media and the public on the nature and extent of drug offences in Canada.

    Release date: 2009-05-13

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200900210844
    Description:

    This report examines the nature and extent of police-reported hate crime in Canada. Key topics include motivations for hate crime (e.g. race or ethnicity, religion, and sexual orientation), types of offences, geographical comparisons and accused and victim characteristics. The report is intended to respond to the needs of those who work in the criminal justice system as well as to inform researchers, policy analysts, academics, the media and the general public.

    Release date: 2009-05-13

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200900210845
    Description:

    This Juristat article presents a profile of abused women in all shelters in Canada that provided residential services in 2007-2008. Selected characteristics of residents are presented including reasons for coming to the shelter, parenting responsibilities, relationship to abuser, repeat stays as well as departures. The data represent a snapshot day, April 16, 2008. Data for this Juristat article come primarily from the Transition Home Survey (THS). The THS, which consists of a biennial census of all residential facilities for female victims of domestic violence, is conducted by the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics as part of the federal government's Family Violence Initiative. Questionnaires are mailed to all shelters known to provide residential services to abused women in every province and territory. The THS collects information on the characteristics of shelter residents on a specific day, as well as the characteristics of facilities during the previous 12 months (April 1, 2007 to March 31, 2008). Comparisons using time-series data from the THS Trend File are also included. The THS Trend File contains only those facilities that participated in each cycle of the survey beginning in 1999-2000.

    Release date: 2009-05-13

  • Journals and periodicals: 85-004-X
    Description:

    This report introduces the Crime Severity Index, a new tool for measuring police-reported crime in Canada that for the first time tracks changes in the severity of crime, not just volume.The report also examines how crime is measured in Canada, as well as recent improvements to statistics on crime that are gathered from the police.

    Release date: 2009-04-21

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2009020
    Description:

    The risk of becoming the victim of violent crime or household property crime can vary according to the mix of social, economic and demographic factors that characterize an individual's circumstances. Income is one such factor. Using data primarily from the 2004 General Social Survey (GSS), this report profiles violent and household victimization among Canadians from low-income households (i.e., under $15,000). The report also provides information on who victims turn to for help, perceptions of neighbourhood safety as well as fear of crime among Canadians from low-income households.

    Release date: 2009-04-16

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2009016
    Description:

    This report provides an overview of issues on mental health and the criminal justice system, as well as the feasibility of collecting data on individuals with mental illness in the criminal justice system. While there have been pockets of studies and data collection activities trying to quantify the issue at the police, courts and corrections levels, there is presently a lack of data to understand the extent of the problem to inform decision-making regarding policy and action, and to measure outcomes of current initiatives and processes.

    The first part of the report describes issues with regard to mental illness and the criminal justice system, including definitional challenges, criminal justice system processes, previous studies on the prevalence of individuals with mental illness in the criminal justice system, and the relationship between individuals with mental illness and criminal justice involvement.

    The second part presents the results from consultations with over 100 stakeholders, including law enforcement, courts, Review Boards, correctional services, mental health organizations, academics and researchers and non-governmental organizations. It also proposes options for collecting data on persons with mental health issues in the criminal justice system.

    Release date: 2009-03-17

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200900110784
    Description:

    This Juristat article examines the number of children and families touched by services of the five Maintenance Enforcement Programs currently reporting to the Survey of Maintenance Enforcement Programs (SMEP). Maintenance Enforcement Programs (MEPs) were created to provide assistance to payors and recipients of child and spousal support, and to improve compliance with support payments primarily for the benefit of the children implicated in the parental break up. Also discussed is the amount of support due to families owed child support, the proportion of these families actually receiving support, and the enforcement response by MEPs when payors default on their child support payments. The final section touches on reciprocating enforcement for interprovincial or international cases that involve two MEPs or child support agencies.

    Information is collected through the SMEP. This survey gathers information on the caseload of the MEP, the sex and median age of payors, recipients and children, typical support amounts, compliance rates, information on arrears, frequency and amount of payments, legislation under which the order for support was made, and types of actions that are initiated in order to enforce support.

    This report contains data from Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia, Alberta, Yukon and the Northwest Territories. In future years, with more provinces and territories able to report to the SMEP, a more complete national picture of maintenance enforcement will emerge.

    Release date: 2009-03-12

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200900110783
    Description:

    The Internet is a virtual world filled with an abundance of information and endless sources of entertainment. While an extraordinary tool, the Internet comes with risks. For children these risks include the dangers of sexual exploitation, such as luring through the Internet.

    Presently, there is little data available on child luring. The information that does exist represents only those incidents that have been reported to the police. Therefore, it is difficult to quantify the full extent and nature of child luring offences in Canada. Nonetheless, using the first available police-reported data on child luring, this Juristat article presents a snapshot of the characteristics of this relatively new criminal offence and the people accused of committing it, as well as an examination of court cases and decisions for child luring offences.

    Release date: 2009-03-12

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200900110781
    Description:

    Forcible confinement refers to the criminal offence of unjustly holding anyone against their will through the use of threats, duress, force or the exhibition of force. In contrast to most violent crimes, police-reported incidents of forcible confinement have been steadily rising in Canada since the late 1980s. This article examines the incidence and nature of forcible confinement in Canada and discusses the long and short-term trends in this offence. It also examines court outcomes for adult cases involving this offence.

    Release date: 2009-03-12

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Analysis (19)

Analysis (19) (19 of 19 results)

  • Journals and periodicals: 85-571-X
    Description:

    This report provides an overview of the first available data on business fraud in Canada focusing on businesses in the retail, banking and insurance sectors. Data used in this report are from the Survey of Fraud against Businesses, 2007-2008. The Survey of Fraud against Businesses provides national-level data on the prevalence and types of fraud experienced, how businesses respond to incidents of fraud, the monetary and non-monetary costs of fraud and fraud detection and prevention practices.

    Release date: 2009-12-10

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200900410929
    Description:

    This annual report is an examination of homicide in Canada. Detailed information is presented on the characteristics of homicide incidents (murder, manslaughter and infanticide), victims and accused within the context of both short and long-term trends. Geographical patterns of homicide are examined at the national and provincial/territorial levels, as well as for major metropolitan areas. Other key themes include international comparisons of homicide, gang-related homicides, firearm-related homicides, youth homicide and family (including spousal) homicides. The data are intended to respond to the needs of those who work in the criminal justice system as well as to inform researchers, policy analysts, academics, the media and the public on the nature and extent of homicide in Canada.

    Release date: 2009-10-28

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200900410932
    Description:

    This report is based on data from the 2007/2008 Victim Services Survey and provides a profile of victim service agencies in Canada that responded to the survey, as well as information on the clients they served. In reference to 2007/2008, the report presents data on the types of agencies in Canada, the services offered, staff and volunteers, and criminal injuries compensation applications and awards. Characteristics of clients, such as sex, age grouping and type of victimization, are based on counts of clients served on a snapshot day of May 28, 2008. The 2007/2008 Victim Services Survey was conducted by the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics and was funded by Justice Canada's Policy Centre for Victim Issues. Victim service agencies surveyed include system-based, police-based and court-based agencies, sexual assault centres, other selected community-based agencies, and criminal injuries compensation and other financial benefit programs for victims of crime.

    Release date: 2009-10-28

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200900410930
    Description:

    This article examines the incidence and nature of three types of police-reported serious assaults in Canada: assault with a weapon or causing bodily harm, aggravated assault and assault against peace officers (including police). The characteristics of these offences are presented and the long and short-terms trends are discussed at the provincial and census metropolitan levels. Adult and youth court data are also utilized to analyze the decisions and sentencing outcomes for serious assault cases.

    Release date: 2009-10-28

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2009018
    Description:

    This research paper focuses on the spatial analysis of crime and neighbourhood characteristics in Toronto. Analysis is based on police-reported crime data from the 2006 Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey and the 2006 Census of Population.

    Release date: 2009-09-24

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2009017
    Description:

    This study examined the influence of school, neighbourhood and student characteristics on the likelihood of students committing violent delinquency. Based on data from the International Youth Survey (2006), findings indicated that there was significant variation in violent delinquency across Toronto schools. In part, this variation was explained by the school climate, or the perceived atmosphere in the school. In particular, a higher level of school capital (positive feeling toward the school) reduced students' chances of committing violent behaviour over and above any of their own risk factors. In contrast, the findings did not support the contention that the level of crime and/or socioeconomic disadvantage in the neighbourhoods surrounding schools had an influence on students' violent behaviour.

    Release date: 2009-09-15

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200900310903
    Description:

    This Juristat article examines the influence of age, education and employment status on the incarceration rates for Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal adults in custody in selected jurisdictions on Census day, meaning May 16 2006. Information on the types of rehabilitative treatments needs of Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal offenders for two jurisdictions, Saskatchewan and the Correctional Service of Canada, is also provided. In addition, this article highlights the changes in the number of adults admitted to custody and community supervision from 2006/2007 to 2007/2008 and the characteristics of these admissions, including age, sex and Aboriginal identity.

    Release date: 2009-07-21

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200900310902
    Description:

    This report presents information on the short and long-term trends in overall, violent and non-violent crime at the national, provincial/territorial and census metropolitan area levels. For the first time, this report includes information on both the volume and the severity of police-reported crime in Canada.

    Release date: 2009-07-21

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2009021
    Description:

    According to the 2006 Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS), over 4.4 million Canadians, 14% of the population, reported at least one physical or mental condition limiting them in their daily activities. Moreover, with an ageing population, that number is expected to grow in the coming years. It is now all the more important to get an accurate picture of criminal victimization of persons with disabilities in Canada.

    Based essentially on 2004 General Social Survey (GSS) data, this profile presents an analysis of the links between criminal victimization and activity limitations, and certain other health factors. In particular, it analyzes characteristics of incidents, victims and their perpetrators. Finally, the perceptions of persons with activity limitations of crime and the justice system are discussed.

    Release date: 2009-05-26

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200900210846
    Description:

    This Juristat provides an overview of young persons under correctional services, in the fifth year since the introduction of the Youth Criminal Justice Act (YCJA), which came into effect on April 1, 2003. It uses data from the Youth Custody and Community Services (YCCS) Survey and the Integrated Correctional Services Survey (ICSS) to analyze trends in admissions to and releases from correctional services including, sentenced custody, remand (pre-trial detention), probation, the community portion of a custody sentence, and deferred custody and supervision order sentence. These data are examined based on key case characteristics such as age, sex, Aboriginal/non-Aboriginal identity, most serious offence and length of time served. Data are analyzed at the provincial/territorial as well as national levels.

    Release date: 2009-05-13

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200900210847
    Description:

    This article analyses data on the incidence and nature of police-reported drug offences in Canada. It examines the long and short-term trends in possession, trafficking, production, importing and exporting of cannabis, cocaine, heroin and "other" drugs, including methamphetamine (crystal meth) and ecstasy. Key issues include geographical comparisons, involvement of youth (12 to 17 years) accused of drug offences, and decisions and sentencing outcomes for those charged with drug offences. These data are intended to inform researchers, the media and the public on the nature and extent of drug offences in Canada.

    Release date: 2009-05-13

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200900210844
    Description:

    This report examines the nature and extent of police-reported hate crime in Canada. Key topics include motivations for hate crime (e.g. race or ethnicity, religion, and sexual orientation), types of offences, geographical comparisons and accused and victim characteristics. The report is intended to respond to the needs of those who work in the criminal justice system as well as to inform researchers, policy analysts, academics, the media and the general public.

    Release date: 2009-05-13

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200900210845
    Description:

    This Juristat article presents a profile of abused women in all shelters in Canada that provided residential services in 2007-2008. Selected characteristics of residents are presented including reasons for coming to the shelter, parenting responsibilities, relationship to abuser, repeat stays as well as departures. The data represent a snapshot day, April 16, 2008. Data for this Juristat article come primarily from the Transition Home Survey (THS). The THS, which consists of a biennial census of all residential facilities for female victims of domestic violence, is conducted by the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics as part of the federal government's Family Violence Initiative. Questionnaires are mailed to all shelters known to provide residential services to abused women in every province and territory. The THS collects information on the characteristics of shelter residents on a specific day, as well as the characteristics of facilities during the previous 12 months (April 1, 2007 to March 31, 2008). Comparisons using time-series data from the THS Trend File are also included. The THS Trend File contains only those facilities that participated in each cycle of the survey beginning in 1999-2000.

    Release date: 2009-05-13

  • Journals and periodicals: 85-004-X
    Description:

    This report introduces the Crime Severity Index, a new tool for measuring police-reported crime in Canada that for the first time tracks changes in the severity of crime, not just volume.The report also examines how crime is measured in Canada, as well as recent improvements to statistics on crime that are gathered from the police.

    Release date: 2009-04-21

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2009020
    Description:

    The risk of becoming the victim of violent crime or household property crime can vary according to the mix of social, economic and demographic factors that characterize an individual's circumstances. Income is one such factor. Using data primarily from the 2004 General Social Survey (GSS), this report profiles violent and household victimization among Canadians from low-income households (i.e., under $15,000). The report also provides information on who victims turn to for help, perceptions of neighbourhood safety as well as fear of crime among Canadians from low-income households.

    Release date: 2009-04-16

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2009016
    Description:

    This report provides an overview of issues on mental health and the criminal justice system, as well as the feasibility of collecting data on individuals with mental illness in the criminal justice system. While there have been pockets of studies and data collection activities trying to quantify the issue at the police, courts and corrections levels, there is presently a lack of data to understand the extent of the problem to inform decision-making regarding policy and action, and to measure outcomes of current initiatives and processes.

    The first part of the report describes issues with regard to mental illness and the criminal justice system, including definitional challenges, criminal justice system processes, previous studies on the prevalence of individuals with mental illness in the criminal justice system, and the relationship between individuals with mental illness and criminal justice involvement.

    The second part presents the results from consultations with over 100 stakeholders, including law enforcement, courts, Review Boards, correctional services, mental health organizations, academics and researchers and non-governmental organizations. It also proposes options for collecting data on persons with mental health issues in the criminal justice system.

    Release date: 2009-03-17

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200900110784
    Description:

    This Juristat article examines the number of children and families touched by services of the five Maintenance Enforcement Programs currently reporting to the Survey of Maintenance Enforcement Programs (SMEP). Maintenance Enforcement Programs (MEPs) were created to provide assistance to payors and recipients of child and spousal support, and to improve compliance with support payments primarily for the benefit of the children implicated in the parental break up. Also discussed is the amount of support due to families owed child support, the proportion of these families actually receiving support, and the enforcement response by MEPs when payors default on their child support payments. The final section touches on reciprocating enforcement for interprovincial or international cases that involve two MEPs or child support agencies.

    Information is collected through the SMEP. This survey gathers information on the caseload of the MEP, the sex and median age of payors, recipients and children, typical support amounts, compliance rates, information on arrears, frequency and amount of payments, legislation under which the order for support was made, and types of actions that are initiated in order to enforce support.

    This report contains data from Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia, Alberta, Yukon and the Northwest Territories. In future years, with more provinces and territories able to report to the SMEP, a more complete national picture of maintenance enforcement will emerge.

    Release date: 2009-03-12

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200900110783
    Description:

    The Internet is a virtual world filled with an abundance of information and endless sources of entertainment. While an extraordinary tool, the Internet comes with risks. For children these risks include the dangers of sexual exploitation, such as luring through the Internet.

    Presently, there is little data available on child luring. The information that does exist represents only those incidents that have been reported to the police. Therefore, it is difficult to quantify the full extent and nature of child luring offences in Canada. Nonetheless, using the first available police-reported data on child luring, this Juristat article presents a snapshot of the characteristics of this relatively new criminal offence and the people accused of committing it, as well as an examination of court cases and decisions for child luring offences.

    Release date: 2009-03-12

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X200900110781
    Description:

    Forcible confinement refers to the criminal offence of unjustly holding anyone against their will through the use of threats, duress, force or the exhibition of force. In contrast to most violent crimes, police-reported incidents of forcible confinement have been steadily rising in Canada since the late 1980s. This article examines the incidence and nature of forcible confinement in Canada and discusses the long and short-term trends in this offence. It also examines court outcomes for adult cases involving this offence.

    Release date: 2009-03-12

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