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All (25)

All (25) (25 of 25 results)

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201000311352
    Description:

    This annual report is an examination of homicide in Canada. Detailed information is presented on the characteristics of homicide incidents (murder, manslaughter and infanticide), victims and accused within the context of both short and long-term trends. Geographical patterns of homicide are examined at the national and provincial/territorial levels, as well as for major metropolitan areas. Other key themes include international comparisons of homicide, gang-related homicides, firearm-related homicides, youth homicide and family (including spousal) homicides. The data are intended to respond to the needs of those who work in the criminal justice system as well as to inform researchers, policy analysts, academics, the media and the public on the nature and extent of homicide in Canada.

    Release date: 2010-10-26

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201000311354
    Description:

    This Juristat article presents information on homicides against police officers in Canada. Specific issues include the incidence and geographical location of this type of offence, the most common types of situations when officers are killed and the type of weapon used.

    Release date: 2010-10-26

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201000311353
    Description:

    This Juristat article provides and overview of the caseload and characteristics of adults admitted to and released from correctional services in 2008/2009, and shows trends in these data from 2004/2005. The article uses data from the Adult Correctional Services (ACS) Survey and the Integrated Correctional Services Survey (ICSS), and includes analysis of the number of admissions to provincial and territorial, and federal custody (sentenced custody, remand and other temporary detention) and to community supervision (probation, conditional sentences, statutory release and parole supervision). These data are examined based on key characteristics such as age, sex, Aboriginal identity, most serious offence and length of time served. An analysis of other characteristics, such as marital status, employment and education levels, is provided for adults in custody in the jurisdictions that provided detailed data (i.e., Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Ontario, Saskatchewan, and Correctional Service of Canada). Furthermore, a ten-year trend in the cost of correctional services is provided along with the number of correctional institutions operating in Canada.

    Release date: 2010-10-26

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201000211340
    Description:

    In 2009, as part of its General Social Survey program, Statistics Canada conducted a survey on victimization and public perceptions of crime and the justice system. It was the fifith time that the General Social Survey (GSS) had examined victimization - previous surveys were conducted in 2004, 1999, 1993 and 1988.

    For the 2009 survey, interviews were conducted by telephone with approximately 19,500 respondents, aged 15 and older, living in the 10 provinces. Respondents were asked about their experiences with criminal victimization. Those respondents who had been victims of a crime in the previous 12 months were asked for detailed information on each incident, including when and where it occurred; whether the incident was reported to the police; and how they were affected by the experience.

    This Juristat explores the overall trends and regional variations of criminal victimization, as well as the individual risk factors associated with victimization.

    Release date: 2010-09-28

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201000211294
    Description:

    This article summarizes data from youth courts across Canada that provided data to the Integrated Criminal Court Survey for the 2008/2009 fiscal year. Information is presented on the characteristics of accused youth and their court cases as well as case outcomes (i.e., decisions and sentencing details). The focus of this article is placed on the most recent year of data (2008/2009) with some jurisdictional and trend analyses.

    Release date: 2010-07-28

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201000211293
    Description:

    This article summarizes data from provincial and territorial adult criminal courts across Canada that provided data to the Integrated Criminal Court Survey for the 2008/2009 fiscal year. Information is presented on the characteristics of accused persons and their court cases as well as criminal court case outcomes (i.e., decisions and sentencing details). Additionally, a section on case processing presents some characteristics of lengthier criminal court cases.

    Release date: 2010-07-28

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201000211292
    Description:

    This report presents information on the short and long-term trends in police-reported crime at the national, provincial/territorial and census metropolitan area levels. It includes information on both the volume and the severity of overall, violent and non-violent crime as well as data on crimes committed by youths aged 12 to 17.

    Release date: 2010-07-20

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201000211242
    Description:

    In 2008, among incidents perpetrated by intimate partners, one quarter of all violent incidents reported to police and one third of homicides involved individuals in dating relationships. Illustrating the importance of exploring violence in all types of intimate relationships, this report examines the prevalence and characteristics of incidents of police-reported dating violence in Canada. For comparison purposes, the population of interest includes individuals aged 15 and older, consistent with previous analyses of police-reported spousal violence in Canada. Results suggest that the characteristics of police-reported dating violence have largely mirrored those of spousal violence, with some notable exceptions. Incidents of dating violence in same-sex relationships and those involving younger victims between the ages of 12 and 14 are also explored in this report.

    Release date: 2010-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201000211241
    Description:

    In 2008, there were about 167,500 youth accused of a police-reported Criminal Code offence and another 27,600 youth were accused of drug and other federal statute violations. To gain a better understanding of the nature of youth crime in Canada (i.e., crimes where the accused was a youth aged 12 to 17), it is useful to consider where and when these crimes occur. Using information from the 2008 Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey (UCR2), this report examines the location, time of year, day of the week and time of day of police-reported youth crimes.

    Release date: 2010-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201000211233
    Description:

    This report examines the nature and extent of police-reported hate crime in Canada. Key topics include motivations for hate crime (e.g. race/ethnicity, religion, and sexual orientation), types of offences, geographical comparisons and accused and victim characteristics. The report is intended to respond to the needs of those who work in the criminal justice system as well as to inform researchers, policy analysts, academics, the media and the general public.

    Release date: 2010-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2010021
    Description:

    While trafficking in persons has become a worldwide concern, current data collection activities reveal that data are limited in scope, incomparable and insufficient to ascertain the true extent of the problem in Canada. This study was conducted by the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics and funded by Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada to examine the feasibility of developing a national data collection framework to measure trafficking in persons in Canada. Consultations were undertaken with key stakeholders from provincial and federal government departments, the police community, non-government organizations and academics. This report identifies a number of data collection and research strategies that could contribute to a better understanding of the nature and scope of human trafficking in Canada.

    Release date: 2010-06-10

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2010020
    Description:

    This research paper focuses on police-reported crime in Inuit Nunangat. Analysis is based on police-reported crime data from the 2006 to 2008 Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey and the 2006 Census of Population. Additional data come from the Homicide Survey from 2000 to 2008. Results show that crime rates are higher in Inuit Nunangat than in the rest of Canada. The impact of socioeconomic and demographic contexts on these differences is explored. In addition, results show that crime rates are lower in communities in Inuit Nunangat where alcohol is prohibited.

    Release date: 2010-05-20

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201000111158
    Description:

    This article explores the processing of divorce cases in civil courts in seven provinces and territories: Nova Scotia, Ontario, Alberta, British Columbia, Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut. Using information from the Civil Court Survey, the article examines some of the key aspects associated with divorce cases, including the volume of cases, the types of court activity associated with the cases, and the length of time taken to process and reach decisions in these cases. Issues identified in these divorce cases, such as access, custody, property and support, are also examined.

    Release date: 2010-05-18

  • Journals and periodicals: 85F0033M
    Description:

    This series of profiles provides analysis on a variety of topics and issues concerning victimization, offending and public perceptions of crime and the justice system. The profiles primarily draw on results from the General Social Survey on victimization. Where applicable, they also incorporate information from other data sources, such as the Census of the Population and the Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey.

    Examples of the topics explored through this series include: Victimization and offending in Canada's territories, Canadians use of crime prevention measures and victimization of older Canadians. This is a unique periodical, of great interest to those who have to plan, establish, administer and evaluate justice programs and projects, or anyone who has an interest in Canada's justice system.

    Release date: 2010-05-06

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2010024
    Description:

    This profile analyzes the differences in the violent victimizations experienced by males and females that comes to the attention of the police. Specifically, the report examines the types of violations experienced by each gender, the seriousness of their victimization and the location of the incident. The report outlines the differences in overall rates of victimization at the census metropolitan area, provincial/territorial and national level. The analysis is based on 2008 police-reported data obtained from the Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey. Funding for this profile was provided by the Policy Centre for Victim Issues of the Department of Justice Canada.

    Release date: 2010-05-06

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201000111147
    Description:

    This Juristat article provides an overview of caseload and characteristics of young persons aged 12 to 17 years admitted to and released from correctional services in 2008/2009, and includes a focused analysis of Aboriginal youth in corrections. The article uses data from the Youth Custody and Community Services (YCCS) Survey and the Integrated Correctional Services Survey (ICSS) to analyze trends in admissions to and releases from sentenced custody, remand (pre-trial detention) and probation. These data are examined based on key case characteristics such as age, sex, most serious offence and length of time served. Focused analysis of Aboriginal youth includes comparisons with non-Aboriginal youth in the following areas: incarceration rates as of Census Day 2006 for jurisdictions that provided detailed data (i.e., Newfoundland and Labrador and New Brunswick combined, Ontario and Alberta); length of time spent in custody and offence types.

    Release date: 2010-04-27

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201000111146
    Description:

    This article examines the use of knives to commit violent crime in Canada with a particular focus on geographical differences. Detailed Information on homicide, robbery, and assault committed with knives is presented at the national, provincial and territorial levels as well as by census metropolitan areas. These data are intended to inform researchers, the media and the public and to inform the development of policy in Canada.

    Release date: 2010-04-27

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2010023
    Description:

    While they may be young, children and youth under the age of 18 fall victim to the same types of violence as adults including physical and sexual assault, robbery, criminal harassment and homicide. They can be victimized by a family member, a friend, an acquaintance or a stranger while in their own home, in their neighbourhood or at school. Quantifying the incidence of violent victimization against children and youth continues to be a challenge. In Canada, detailed information about police-reported violent incidents committed against children and youth is collected through the Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR2) Survey. This report analyzes the nature and extent of police-reported violence committed against children and youth under the age of 18. It examines differences in victimization based on sex and age of victims, type of offence, prevalence across the provinces and territories, relationship to the perpetrator, weapon used and level of injury. It also presents information on trends over time.

    Release date: 2010-03-29

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201000111115
    Description:

    Using data reported by Canadian police services, this article examines trends in robbery at the national and provincial/territorial levels and by census metropolitan areas. Trends in specific types of robbery are presented, including street robberies as well as those that occur in banks, transit facilities, convenience stores and residences ("home invasions"). The use of weapons to commit robbery, including firearm-related robberies, is explored. These data are intended to inform criminological researchers, academics, the media and the public, both in Canada and internationally.

    Release date: 2010-03-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000111123
    Description:

    This article uses the 2004 General Social Survey on criminal victimization to explore how men and women of the core working age population (25 to 54 years) living in Census Metropolitan Areas differ in the precautions taken to avoid victimization. The results indicate that though men and women do not differ substantially in the amount of crime they perceive around them - they do differ in the precautions taken to avoid victimization. This difference remains unchanged even when other factors like fear of crime, income, age, and victimization experiences are taken into account.

    Release date: 2010-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2010019
    Description:

    This study examines the relationship between parental monitoring and youth violent delinquency, as well as the extent to which this relationship may be influenced by the school context. The study is based on data from the International Youth Survey (2006) which gathered information from a sample of students in grades 7, 8 and 9 attending Toronto schools. Findings indicate that a low level of parental monitoring is associated with a higher likelihood of youth violent delinquency, and this effect is stronger when youth attend schools where the prevalence of delinquency among the student population is high. This finding supports the hypothesis that the negative influence of low parental monitoring is magnified when youth are also exposed to a pool of delinquent peers, and further suggests that the effectiveness of particular parenting strategies may vary depending on the environments to which youth are exposed.

    Release date: 2010-01-12

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2010022
    Description:

    A large proportion of all victimization incidents are experienced by a relatively small number of victims who experienced multiple incidents. According to the 2004 General Social Survey (GSS) on Victimization, a little more than 10% of the population aged 15 and over were the victims of more than one crime during the 12 months preceding the survey, representing 60% of all criminal incidents. If one considers only violent crimes, 2% of the population accounted for 60% of all violent victimization reported to the GSS.

    Given that a small proportion of individuals and households face a significant proportion of crimes, as a result determining which characteristics increases a person's risk of being victimized will help to improve the effectiveness of crime prevention measures, and perhaps help prevent further incidents of victimization.

    Release date: 2010-01-06

Data (3)

Data (3) (3 results)

Analysis (22)

Analysis (22) (22 of 22 results)

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201000311352
    Description:

    This annual report is an examination of homicide in Canada. Detailed information is presented on the characteristics of homicide incidents (murder, manslaughter and infanticide), victims and accused within the context of both short and long-term trends. Geographical patterns of homicide are examined at the national and provincial/territorial levels, as well as for major metropolitan areas. Other key themes include international comparisons of homicide, gang-related homicides, firearm-related homicides, youth homicide and family (including spousal) homicides. The data are intended to respond to the needs of those who work in the criminal justice system as well as to inform researchers, policy analysts, academics, the media and the public on the nature and extent of homicide in Canada.

    Release date: 2010-10-26

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201000311354
    Description:

    This Juristat article presents information on homicides against police officers in Canada. Specific issues include the incidence and geographical location of this type of offence, the most common types of situations when officers are killed and the type of weapon used.

    Release date: 2010-10-26

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201000311353
    Description:

    This Juristat article provides and overview of the caseload and characteristics of adults admitted to and released from correctional services in 2008/2009, and shows trends in these data from 2004/2005. The article uses data from the Adult Correctional Services (ACS) Survey and the Integrated Correctional Services Survey (ICSS), and includes analysis of the number of admissions to provincial and territorial, and federal custody (sentenced custody, remand and other temporary detention) and to community supervision (probation, conditional sentences, statutory release and parole supervision). These data are examined based on key characteristics such as age, sex, Aboriginal identity, most serious offence and length of time served. An analysis of other characteristics, such as marital status, employment and education levels, is provided for adults in custody in the jurisdictions that provided detailed data (i.e., Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Ontario, Saskatchewan, and Correctional Service of Canada). Furthermore, a ten-year trend in the cost of correctional services is provided along with the number of correctional institutions operating in Canada.

    Release date: 2010-10-26

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201000211340
    Description:

    In 2009, as part of its General Social Survey program, Statistics Canada conducted a survey on victimization and public perceptions of crime and the justice system. It was the fifith time that the General Social Survey (GSS) had examined victimization - previous surveys were conducted in 2004, 1999, 1993 and 1988.

    For the 2009 survey, interviews were conducted by telephone with approximately 19,500 respondents, aged 15 and older, living in the 10 provinces. Respondents were asked about their experiences with criminal victimization. Those respondents who had been victims of a crime in the previous 12 months were asked for detailed information on each incident, including when and where it occurred; whether the incident was reported to the police; and how they were affected by the experience.

    This Juristat explores the overall trends and regional variations of criminal victimization, as well as the individual risk factors associated with victimization.

    Release date: 2010-09-28

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201000211294
    Description:

    This article summarizes data from youth courts across Canada that provided data to the Integrated Criminal Court Survey for the 2008/2009 fiscal year. Information is presented on the characteristics of accused youth and their court cases as well as case outcomes (i.e., decisions and sentencing details). The focus of this article is placed on the most recent year of data (2008/2009) with some jurisdictional and trend analyses.

    Release date: 2010-07-28

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201000211293
    Description:

    This article summarizes data from provincial and territorial adult criminal courts across Canada that provided data to the Integrated Criminal Court Survey for the 2008/2009 fiscal year. Information is presented on the characteristics of accused persons and their court cases as well as criminal court case outcomes (i.e., decisions and sentencing details). Additionally, a section on case processing presents some characteristics of lengthier criminal court cases.

    Release date: 2010-07-28

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201000211292
    Description:

    This report presents information on the short and long-term trends in police-reported crime at the national, provincial/territorial and census metropolitan area levels. It includes information on both the volume and the severity of overall, violent and non-violent crime as well as data on crimes committed by youths aged 12 to 17.

    Release date: 2010-07-20

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201000211242
    Description:

    In 2008, among incidents perpetrated by intimate partners, one quarter of all violent incidents reported to police and one third of homicides involved individuals in dating relationships. Illustrating the importance of exploring violence in all types of intimate relationships, this report examines the prevalence and characteristics of incidents of police-reported dating violence in Canada. For comparison purposes, the population of interest includes individuals aged 15 and older, consistent with previous analyses of police-reported spousal violence in Canada. Results suggest that the characteristics of police-reported dating violence have largely mirrored those of spousal violence, with some notable exceptions. Incidents of dating violence in same-sex relationships and those involving younger victims between the ages of 12 and 14 are also explored in this report.

    Release date: 2010-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201000211241
    Description:

    In 2008, there were about 167,500 youth accused of a police-reported Criminal Code offence and another 27,600 youth were accused of drug and other federal statute violations. To gain a better understanding of the nature of youth crime in Canada (i.e., crimes where the accused was a youth aged 12 to 17), it is useful to consider where and when these crimes occur. Using information from the 2008 Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey (UCR2), this report examines the location, time of year, day of the week and time of day of police-reported youth crimes.

    Release date: 2010-06-29

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201000211233
    Description:

    This report examines the nature and extent of police-reported hate crime in Canada. Key topics include motivations for hate crime (e.g. race/ethnicity, religion, and sexual orientation), types of offences, geographical comparisons and accused and victim characteristics. The report is intended to respond to the needs of those who work in the criminal justice system as well as to inform researchers, policy analysts, academics, the media and the general public.

    Release date: 2010-06-14

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2010021
    Description:

    While trafficking in persons has become a worldwide concern, current data collection activities reveal that data are limited in scope, incomparable and insufficient to ascertain the true extent of the problem in Canada. This study was conducted by the Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics and funded by Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness Canada to examine the feasibility of developing a national data collection framework to measure trafficking in persons in Canada. Consultations were undertaken with key stakeholders from provincial and federal government departments, the police community, non-government organizations and academics. This report identifies a number of data collection and research strategies that could contribute to a better understanding of the nature and scope of human trafficking in Canada.

    Release date: 2010-06-10

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2010020
    Description:

    This research paper focuses on police-reported crime in Inuit Nunangat. Analysis is based on police-reported crime data from the 2006 to 2008 Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey and the 2006 Census of Population. Additional data come from the Homicide Survey from 2000 to 2008. Results show that crime rates are higher in Inuit Nunangat than in the rest of Canada. The impact of socioeconomic and demographic contexts on these differences is explored. In addition, results show that crime rates are lower in communities in Inuit Nunangat where alcohol is prohibited.

    Release date: 2010-05-20

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201000111158
    Description:

    This article explores the processing of divorce cases in civil courts in seven provinces and territories: Nova Scotia, Ontario, Alberta, British Columbia, Yukon, Northwest Territories and Nunavut. Using information from the Civil Court Survey, the article examines some of the key aspects associated with divorce cases, including the volume of cases, the types of court activity associated with the cases, and the length of time taken to process and reach decisions in these cases. Issues identified in these divorce cases, such as access, custody, property and support, are also examined.

    Release date: 2010-05-18

  • Journals and periodicals: 85F0033M
    Description:

    This series of profiles provides analysis on a variety of topics and issues concerning victimization, offending and public perceptions of crime and the justice system. The profiles primarily draw on results from the General Social Survey on victimization. Where applicable, they also incorporate information from other data sources, such as the Census of the Population and the Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey.

    Examples of the topics explored through this series include: Victimization and offending in Canada's territories, Canadians use of crime prevention measures and victimization of older Canadians. This is a unique periodical, of great interest to those who have to plan, establish, administer and evaluate justice programs and projects, or anyone who has an interest in Canada's justice system.

    Release date: 2010-05-06

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2010024
    Description:

    This profile analyzes the differences in the violent victimizations experienced by males and females that comes to the attention of the police. Specifically, the report examines the types of violations experienced by each gender, the seriousness of their victimization and the location of the incident. The report outlines the differences in overall rates of victimization at the census metropolitan area, provincial/territorial and national level. The analysis is based on 2008 police-reported data obtained from the Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting Survey. Funding for this profile was provided by the Policy Centre for Victim Issues of the Department of Justice Canada.

    Release date: 2010-05-06

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201000111147
    Description:

    This Juristat article provides an overview of caseload and characteristics of young persons aged 12 to 17 years admitted to and released from correctional services in 2008/2009, and includes a focused analysis of Aboriginal youth in corrections. The article uses data from the Youth Custody and Community Services (YCCS) Survey and the Integrated Correctional Services Survey (ICSS) to analyze trends in admissions to and releases from sentenced custody, remand (pre-trial detention) and probation. These data are examined based on key case characteristics such as age, sex, most serious offence and length of time served. Focused analysis of Aboriginal youth includes comparisons with non-Aboriginal youth in the following areas: incarceration rates as of Census Day 2006 for jurisdictions that provided detailed data (i.e., Newfoundland and Labrador and New Brunswick combined, Ontario and Alberta); length of time spent in custody and offence types.

    Release date: 2010-04-27

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201000111146
    Description:

    This article examines the use of knives to commit violent crime in Canada with a particular focus on geographical differences. Detailed Information on homicide, robbery, and assault committed with knives is presented at the national, provincial and territorial levels as well as by census metropolitan areas. These data are intended to inform researchers, the media and the public and to inform the development of policy in Canada.

    Release date: 2010-04-27

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2010023
    Description:

    While they may be young, children and youth under the age of 18 fall victim to the same types of violence as adults including physical and sexual assault, robbery, criminal harassment and homicide. They can be victimized by a family member, a friend, an acquaintance or a stranger while in their own home, in their neighbourhood or at school. Quantifying the incidence of violent victimization against children and youth continues to be a challenge. In Canada, detailed information about police-reported violent incidents committed against children and youth is collected through the Incident-based Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR2) Survey. This report analyzes the nature and extent of police-reported violence committed against children and youth under the age of 18. It examines differences in victimization based on sex and age of victims, type of offence, prevalence across the provinces and territories, relationship to the perpetrator, weapon used and level of injury. It also presents information on trends over time.

    Release date: 2010-03-29

  • Articles and reports: 85-002-X201000111115
    Description:

    Using data reported by Canadian police services, this article examines trends in robbery at the national and provincial/territorial levels and by census metropolitan areas. Trends in specific types of robbery are presented, including street robberies as well as those that occur in banks, transit facilities, convenience stores and residences ("home invasions"). The use of weapons to commit robbery, including firearm-related robberies, is explored. These data are intended to inform criminological researchers, academics, the media and the public, both in Canada and internationally.

    Release date: 2010-03-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X201000111123
    Description:

    This article uses the 2004 General Social Survey on criminal victimization to explore how men and women of the core working age population (25 to 54 years) living in Census Metropolitan Areas differ in the precautions taken to avoid victimization. The results indicate that though men and women do not differ substantially in the amount of crime they perceive around them - they do differ in the precautions taken to avoid victimization. This difference remains unchanged even when other factors like fear of crime, income, age, and victimization experiences are taken into account.

    Release date: 2010-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 85-561-M2010019
    Description:

    This study examines the relationship between parental monitoring and youth violent delinquency, as well as the extent to which this relationship may be influenced by the school context. The study is based on data from the International Youth Survey (2006) which gathered information from a sample of students in grades 7, 8 and 9 attending Toronto schools. Findings indicate that a low level of parental monitoring is associated with a higher likelihood of youth violent delinquency, and this effect is stronger when youth attend schools where the prevalence of delinquency among the student population is high. This finding supports the hypothesis that the negative influence of low parental monitoring is magnified when youth are also exposed to a pool of delinquent peers, and further suggests that the effectiveness of particular parenting strategies may vary depending on the environments to which youth are exposed.

    Release date: 2010-01-12

  • Articles and reports: 85F0033M2010022
    Description:

    A large proportion of all victimization incidents are experienced by a relatively small number of victims who experienced multiple incidents. According to the 2004 General Social Survey (GSS) on Victimization, a little more than 10% of the population aged 15 and over were the victims of more than one crime during the 12 months preceding the survey, representing 60% of all criminal incidents. If one considers only violent crimes, 2% of the population accounted for 60% of all violent victimization reported to the GSS.

    Given that a small proportion of individuals and households face a significant proportion of crimes, as a result determining which characteristics increases a person's risk of being victimized will help to improve the effectiveness of crime prevention measures, and perhaps help prevent further incidents of victimization.

    Release date: 2010-01-06

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