Statistics by subject – Leisure activities and spending

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  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2015-04-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-008-X200900110690
    Description:

    This article is about Canadians' participation in active leisure. Active leisure helps keep us fit and healthy. It may also save health care costs. Using data from the 1992 and 2005 General Social Surveys on time use, this article looks at the factors influencing active leisure activities of Canadians aged 20 and over. It will also examine which groups are more likely to participate in active leisure in 2005.

    Release date: 2009-02-17

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2008066
    Description:

    This paper uses data derived from the culture supplement of the 2005 General Social Survey to examine, from a multivariate perspective, cultural participation across socioeconomic and demographic attributes.

    Release date: 2008-06-26

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20030049503
    Description:

    Using data from the Survey of Household Spending (SHS), this article explores household spending on culture goods and services over a five year period, from 1999 to 2004, and examines differences in average spending by household type.

    Release date: 2006-11-02

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X2006050
    Description:

    In recent years, while Canadians have spent more on entertainment at home, there has concurrently been an increase in demand for entertainment outside the home. The entertainment services outside the home discussed in this article include attendance at movie theatres, performing arts and spectator sports events and admissions to heritage institutions. This shift in preferences along with growth in incomes, population and prices caused the consumer market for entertainment services to expand from $2.3 billion in 1998 to $3.2 billion in 2003, an increase of 41%.

    Based primarily on Survey of Household Spending data from 1998 and 2003, this article examines changes over the five year period in household spending on entertainment services. In particular, it investigates how spending changed in each province and for some household types and each household income quintile. It also looks at how the performance of entertainment services providers may have been affected by such changes. As the entertainment services market grows, the providers of these services face the challenge of retaining existing customers and attracting new ones. Knowing how consumer characteristics such as income, type of household and geographical location affect entertainment spending can enable suppliers to better provide and market their services.

    Release date: 2006-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 63-018-X20060029223
    Description:

    In recent years, while Canadians have spent more on entertainment at home, there has concurrently been an increase in demand for entertainment outside the home. The entertainment services outside the home discussed in this article include attendance at movie theatres, performing arts and spectator sports events and admissions to heritage institutions. This shift in preferences along with growth in incomes, population and prices caused the consumer market for entertainment services to expand from $2.3 billion in 1998 to $3.2 billion in 2003, an increase of 41%.

    Based primarily on Survey of Household Spending data from 1998 and 2003, this article examines changes over the five year period in household spending on entertainment services. In particular, it investigates how spending changed in each province and for some household types and each household income quintile. It also looks at how the performance of entertainment services providers may have been affected by such changes. As the entertainment services market grows, the providers of these services face the challenge of retaining existing customers and attracting new ones. Knowing how consumer characteristics such as income, type of household and geographical location affect entertainment spending can enable suppliers to better provide and market their services.

    Release date: 2006-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20030017816
    Description:

    This article examines the use of computers, e-mail and the Internet in the culture sector in industries such as recording production, film and publishing, performing arts and heritage institutions.

    Release date: 2005-04-07

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2004021
    Description:

    This paper presents a conceptual basis for defining culture using Statistics Canada's classification systems. The 2004 Canadian Framework for Culture Statistics has been revised. A new publication series on the Canadian Framework for Culture Statistics 2011 (Catalogue 87-542-X) is now available.

    Release date: 2004-08-23

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20020046979
    Description:

    This article examines how people spend their leisure time and compares participation rates for various leisure activities internationally. The article looks at leisure activities such as reading, television viewing, radio listening, attendance at cultural activities, using the Internet and playing computer games. Income level, education, age, labour force activity and household type are taken into consideration when making international comparisons of how people spend their free time.

    Release date: 2004-07-08

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20031126700
    Description:

    This document examines the effects of gambling in today's society.

    Release date: 2004-03-19

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20020036767
    Description:

    When it comes to cultural or artistic products such as sculptures and paintings, Italy has centuries of rich cultural heritage to draw upon. Thus, it comes as no small surprise that Italy is a major source for culture goods imports to Canada. From 1996 to 2002, Italy was ranked sixth in terms of Canada's suppliers of culture goods.

    Imports from Italy had previously been flat or declining until 2001, but jumped 72% year-to-year in 2002. The increase came despite a sizable appreciation of the Euro against the Canadian dollar. Since spending on culture goods tends to increase with income, it is possible that Canada's growth in disposable income and consumer spending since 2001 contributed to this jump.

    Release date: 2004-01-13

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20020036755
    Description:

    This article examines household spending on entertainment services in 2001, focussing on differences in spending by household type and income. Entertainment services industries rely on spending by various types of households. Knowledge about the characteristics of consumers and their spending patterns enables entertainment service providers to market their products to meet the needs of the current market, and to develop programs to attract new consumers.

    Previous research looking at differences in spending on entertainment services has shown that consumer preferences vary across socio-economic factors such as income, household type and geographical region. Similar to entertainment spending patterns in 1997, there was evidence that Canadians continued to 'cocoon' in 2001, spending more on entertainment inside the home and less outside the home.

    Spending on entertainment services also varied by level of household income. It is not surprising that both the percentage of households that spent on entertainment and the average amount spent increased with income. Households in the highest income quintile accounted for a disproportionate share of the consumer market for entertainment services in 2001.

    The presence of children in the household made a real difference in spending patterns. Households with children represented the highest percentage of reporting households in seven of the eight categories of entertainment spending and, on average, they spent the most in six of the eight categories.

    Release date: 2004-01-13

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20020026549
    Description:

    This article examines trends in how Canadians donate their time and money to arts and culture organizations, using results from the 2000 and 1997 cycles of the National Survey on Giving, Volunteering and Participating.

    Release date: 2003-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20010026041
    Description:

    This article focusses on trends in radio listening, with an emphasis on fall 2000.

    Release date: 2001-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20010026042
    Description:

    This article analyses the economic effects of exporting Canadian culture products and importing foreign products. It uses data based on culture commodity trade figures for the first six months of 2001.

    Release date: 2001-12-19

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1999023
    Description:

    Canada's consumer market for entertainment services grew almost 50% in real terms from 1986 to 1996. Canadians are spending more on renting cablevision, video games videotapes and satellite services, and they still attend live sports events, movies and theatre. As a result, spending on entertainment services comprises a growing proportion of the average household's budget. This article explores the shares of Canada's consumer market for entertainment services that are accounted for by various household types and income groups.

    Release date: 1999-05-12

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X19980034327
    Description:

    Canada's consumer market for entertainment services grew almost 50% in real terms from 1986 to 1996. Canadians are spending more on renting cablevision, video games videotapes and satellite services, and they still attend live sports events, movies and theatre. As a result, spending on entertainment services comprises a growing proportion of the average household's budget. This article explores the shares of Canada's consumer market for entertainment services that are accounted for by various household types and income groups.

    Release date: 1999-01-15

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X19970043663
    Description:

    Beginning with this issue, Service Indicators is expanding its coverage of the services industries to include the amusement and recreation services industries and the personal and houshold services industries. This brief article investigates how the amusement and recreation services industry has fared since 1992, by examining its employment, remuneration and output data.

    Release date: 1998-04-15

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X19960032898
    Description:

    Gambling is a growth industry that is creating new jobs and generating increasing revenue for government. This article explores the industry's employment growth and the characteristics of its workers and jobs, as well as the revenue generated by lotteries, casinos and video lottery terminals.

    Release date: 1996-09-03

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Reference (4) (4 of 4 results)

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