Statistics by subject – Culture and leisure

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All (7)

All (7) (7 of 7 results)

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20030038997
    Description:

    The study evaluates and analyses the export of culture goods to China and Canada's imports from China.

    Release date: 2006-06-12

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20030028446
    Description:

    Using data from the 1996 and 2001 Censuses of Population, this article discusses the employment income in culture occupations and compares it with the employment income of all occupations.

    Release date: 2005-08-23

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20030028447
    Description:

    This article investigates gender dynamics in employment in Canada's culture sector. It explores various questions such as changes in female employment and characteristics of female participation in the workforce by various culture sub-sectors and activities.

    Release date: 2005-08-23

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20030017808
    Description:

    This article estimates and analyses the economic impact of the culture sector on the Canadian economy. It measures the contribution of the culture sector to Canada's employment and gross domestic product (GDP).

    Release date: 2005-04-07

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20030017815
    Description:

    This article estimates and analyses the economic impact of the culture sector on the economy of Canada's provinces. It measures the contribution of the culture sector to provincial employment and gross domestic product (GDP).

    Release date: 2005-04-07

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20020036755
    Description:

    This article examines household spending on entertainment services in 2001, focussing on differences in spending by household type and income. Entertainment services industries rely on spending by various types of households. Knowledge about the characteristics of consumers and their spending patterns enables entertainment service providers to market their products to meet the needs of the current market, and to develop programs to attract new consumers.

    Previous research looking at differences in spending on entertainment services has shown that consumer preferences vary across socio-economic factors such as income, household type and geographical region. Similar to entertainment spending patterns in 1997, there was evidence that Canadians continued to 'cocoon' in 2001, spending more on entertainment inside the home and less outside the home.

    Spending on entertainment services also varied by level of household income. It is not surprising that both the percentage of households that spent on entertainment and the average amount spent increased with income. Households in the highest income quintile accounted for a disproportionate share of the consumer market for entertainment services in 2001.

    The presence of children in the household made a real difference in spending patterns. Households with children represented the highest percentage of reporting households in seven of the eight categories of entertainment spending and, on average, they spent the most in six of the eight categories.

    Release date: 2004-01-13

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X20020026438
    Description:

    There is a sizeable consumer market for entertainment services in Canada. Entertainment services consumption is influenced by economic conditions. For example, during economic downturns expenditures on discretionary items such as entertainment are usually the first to be cut. The opposite is usually the case when the economy is buoyant. Thus, entertainment services providers are more affected by business cycle fluctuations than industries that provide necessities.

    Release date: 2002-10-28

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Analysis (7)

Analysis (7) (7 of 7 results)

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20030038997
    Description:

    The study evaluates and analyses the export of culture goods to China and Canada's imports from China.

    Release date: 2006-06-12

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20030028446
    Description:

    Using data from the 1996 and 2001 Censuses of Population, this article discusses the employment income in culture occupations and compares it with the employment income of all occupations.

    Release date: 2005-08-23

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20030028447
    Description:

    This article investigates gender dynamics in employment in Canada's culture sector. It explores various questions such as changes in female employment and characteristics of female participation in the workforce by various culture sub-sectors and activities.

    Release date: 2005-08-23

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20030017808
    Description:

    This article estimates and analyses the economic impact of the culture sector on the Canadian economy. It measures the contribution of the culture sector to Canada's employment and gross domestic product (GDP).

    Release date: 2005-04-07

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20030017815
    Description:

    This article estimates and analyses the economic impact of the culture sector on the economy of Canada's provinces. It measures the contribution of the culture sector to provincial employment and gross domestic product (GDP).

    Release date: 2005-04-07

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20020036755
    Description:

    This article examines household spending on entertainment services in 2001, focussing on differences in spending by household type and income. Entertainment services industries rely on spending by various types of households. Knowledge about the characteristics of consumers and their spending patterns enables entertainment service providers to market their products to meet the needs of the current market, and to develop programs to attract new consumers.

    Previous research looking at differences in spending on entertainment services has shown that consumer preferences vary across socio-economic factors such as income, household type and geographical region. Similar to entertainment spending patterns in 1997, there was evidence that Canadians continued to 'cocoon' in 2001, spending more on entertainment inside the home and less outside the home.

    Spending on entertainment services also varied by level of household income. It is not surprising that both the percentage of households that spent on entertainment and the average amount spent increased with income. Households in the highest income quintile accounted for a disproportionate share of the consumer market for entertainment services in 2001.

    The presence of children in the household made a real difference in spending patterns. Households with children represented the highest percentage of reporting households in seven of the eight categories of entertainment spending and, on average, they spent the most in six of the eight categories.

    Release date: 2004-01-13

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X20020026438
    Description:

    There is a sizeable consumer market for entertainment services in Canada. Entertainment services consumption is influenced by economic conditions. For example, during economic downturns expenditures on discretionary items such as entertainment are usually the first to be cut. The opposite is usually the case when the economy is buoyant. Thus, entertainment services providers are more affected by business cycle fluctuations than industries that provide necessities.

    Release date: 2002-10-28

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