Statistics by subject – Culture and leisure

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All (3)

All (3) (3 results)

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1995006
    Description:

    This paper traces the path of television in Canada, from its introduction in 1952 to the present, examines its economics, discusses aspects of its content and takes a glimpse at its future.

    Television stations compete more than ever before for advertising dollars. This reflects the increase in the number of stations as well as the emergence of specialty channels. At the same time, technological advancements have expanded the use television to more than just program viewing, while the average viewing time is on the decline. There exists an asymmetry between revenue generation and program expenses. Specifically, the advertising revenues generated by news and information do not cover the cost of production, while drama generates more advertising revenues than is required for its production or purchase.

    The multi-channel universe promised by direct to home satellite broadcasting not only threatens even more the advertising revenue of television stations, but exerts further pressure on cable companies as well.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Table: 56-001-X19980025195
    Description:

    Total broadcasting revenue of the private sector was $2,574.9 million compared to $2,391.6 million in 1996, an increase of 7.7%. Total expenses for private stations which include departmental, depreciation and interest expenses increased 3.4% to $2,337.4 million from $2,261.0 million in 1996.

    Release date: 1998-07-14

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X19970043663
    Description:

    Beginning with this issue, Service Indicators is expanding its coverage of the services industries to include the amusement and recreation services industries and the personal and houshold services industries. This brief article investigates how the amusement and recreation services industry has fared since 1992, by examining its employment, remuneration and output data.

    Release date: 1998-04-15

Data (1)

Data (1) (1 result)

  • Table: 56-001-X19980025195
    Description:

    Total broadcasting revenue of the private sector was $2,574.9 million compared to $2,391.6 million in 1996, an increase of 7.7%. Total expenses for private stations which include departmental, depreciation and interest expenses increased 3.4% to $2,337.4 million from $2,261.0 million in 1996.

    Release date: 1998-07-14

Analysis (2)

Analysis (2) (2 results)

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X1995006
    Description:

    This paper traces the path of television in Canada, from its introduction in 1952 to the present, examines its economics, discusses aspects of its content and takes a glimpse at its future.

    Television stations compete more than ever before for advertising dollars. This reflects the increase in the number of stations as well as the emergence of specialty channels. At the same time, technological advancements have expanded the use television to more than just program viewing, while the average viewing time is on the decline. There exists an asymmetry between revenue generation and program expenses. Specifically, the advertising revenues generated by news and information do not cover the cost of production, while drama generates more advertising revenues than is required for its production or purchase.

    The multi-channel universe promised by direct to home satellite broadcasting not only threatens even more the advertising revenue of television stations, but exerts further pressure on cable companies as well.

    Release date: 1998-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 63-016-X19970043663
    Description:

    Beginning with this issue, Service Indicators is expanding its coverage of the services industries to include the amusement and recreation services industries and the personal and houshold services industries. This brief article investigates how the amusement and recreation services industry has fared since 1992, by examining its employment, remuneration and output data.

    Release date: 1998-04-15

Reference (0)

Reference (0) (0 results)

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