Statistics by subject – Culture and leisure

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All (18) (18 of 18 results)

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2004023
    Description:

    This article estimates and analyses the economic impact of the culture sector on Canada's employment and gross domestic product (GDP).

    Release date: 2004-12-02

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2004024
    Description:

    This paper analyses the impact of the culture sector on Ontario's gross domestic product (GDP) and employment.

    Release date: 2004-12-02

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2004025
    Description:

    This article estimates and analyses the impact of the culture sector on provincial employment and gross domestic product (GDP).

    Release date: 2004-12-02

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040037431
    Description:

    This article describes the continued resiliency of the radio industry, which has survived television as well as personal stereos such as the Sony Walkman and MP3 players.

    Release date: 2004-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 89-613-M2004004
    Description:

    The report examines culture in census metropolitan areas (CMAs) in 2001. The report uses the 1996 and 2001 censuses, and data from Statistics Canada's Culture Statistics Program and the Centre for Education Statistics.

    Release date: 2004-10-22

  • Table: 56-001-X20040047805
    Description:

    This issue of the Bulletin presents financial and operating statistics for the cable, direct-to-home satellite and wireless cable television industries for the 2000 to 2003 period.

    Release date: 2004-09-14

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2004021
    Description:

    This paper presents a conceptual basis for defining culture using Statistics Canada's classification systems. The 2004 Canadian Framework for Culture Statistics has been revised. A new publication series on the Canadian Framework for Culture Statistics 2011 (Catalogue 87-542-X) is now available.

    Release date: 2004-08-23

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2004020
    Description:

    This article discusses the collection and interpretation of statistical data on Canada's trade in culture goods. It defines the products that are included in culture trade and explains how appropriate products are selected from the relevant classification standards.

    This version has been replaced by Culture Goods Trade Data User Guide, Catalogue No. 81-595-MIE2006040.

    Release date: 2004-07-28

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20020046977
    Description:

    The article discusses the diverse factors that influence the choice of location for film production, the role of governments in promoting the film industry and the challenges Canada faces in attracting film projects in an industry where many localities, both within and outside Canada, compete for the available production dollars.

    Release date: 2004-07-08

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20020046980
    Description:

    This article examines the trade in cultural goods between Canada and Cuba and discusses Canada's trade surplus with Cuba.

    Release date: 2004-07-08

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20020046979
    Description:

    This article examines how people spend their leisure time and compares participation rates for various leisure activities internationally. The article looks at leisure activities such as reading, television viewing, radio listening, attendance at cultural activities, using the Internet and playing computer games. Income level, education, age, labour force activity and household type are taken into consideration when making international comparisons of how people spend their free time.

    Release date: 2004-07-08

  • Table: 56-001-X20040037806
    Description:

    This issue of the Bulletin presents financial and operating statistics for the private radio industry for the 2000 to 2003 period.

    Release date: 2004-07-05

  • Table: 56-001-X20040027807
    Description:

    This issue of the Bulletin presents financial and operating statistics for the television broadcasting industry for the 2000 to 2003 period.

    Release date: 2004-06-08

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20031126700
    Description:

    This document examines the effects of gambling in today's society.

    Release date: 2004-03-19

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040016795
    Description:

    From the early 1950s to the mid-1990s, cable companies were the only businesses offering multi-channel video services, and these services represented much of their revenues. The penetration of cable services grew steadily over the period and peaked in the early 1990s. The introduction of competition from wireless operators has given new life to the industry and its clientele has expanded by more than 20% from 1997 to 2002. Wireless operator companies, which had virtually no customers in 1997, have captured a substantial share of the multi-channel video market. Cable operators have diversified and now play a major role in the Internet access market. Digital technology is gradually displacing analogue technologies.

    Release date: 2004-03-05

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20020036754
    Description:

    This article examines some of the many factors that influence the well-being of Canada's culture sector and its workforce: the country's general economic conditions; government programs and policies; and consumer demand, of both domestic and imported culture goods and services.

    The forces of economic, social, political and technological change are radically transforming the world of culture and its labour force. The 1980s saw a rapid expansion of the culture workforce to meet increased demand for culture goods and services. This period of growth paused with the 1990/91 recession: jobs, earnings and revenues all fell off. With the end of the recession, the labour market rebounded and culture workers rode this high employment wave throughout the remainder of the decade.

    Countries have become more conscious of the role that culture plays in their development, their identity and the sustenance of their value systems. In many countries culture sectors are now targets of international economic development policies. Global trade and the continued high demand in Canada for imported culture goods and services make the culture economy in this country (and, in turn, employment in the culture sector) variable and highly competitive.

    Release date: 2004-01-13

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20020036767
    Description:

    When it comes to cultural or artistic products such as sculptures and paintings, Italy has centuries of rich cultural heritage to draw upon. Thus, it comes as no small surprise that Italy is a major source for culture goods imports to Canada. From 1996 to 2002, Italy was ranked sixth in terms of Canada's suppliers of culture goods.

    Imports from Italy had previously been flat or declining until 2001, but jumped 72% year-to-year in 2002. The increase came despite a sizable appreciation of the Euro against the Canadian dollar. Since spending on culture goods tends to increase with income, it is possible that Canada's growth in disposable income and consumer spending since 2001 contributed to this jump.

    Release date: 2004-01-13

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20020036755
    Description:

    This article examines household spending on entertainment services in 2001, focussing on differences in spending by household type and income. Entertainment services industries rely on spending by various types of households. Knowledge about the characteristics of consumers and their spending patterns enables entertainment service providers to market their products to meet the needs of the current market, and to develop programs to attract new consumers.

    Previous research looking at differences in spending on entertainment services has shown that consumer preferences vary across socio-economic factors such as income, household type and geographical region. Similar to entertainment spending patterns in 1997, there was evidence that Canadians continued to 'cocoon' in 2001, spending more on entertainment inside the home and less outside the home.

    Spending on entertainment services also varied by level of household income. It is not surprising that both the percentage of households that spent on entertainment and the average amount spent increased with income. Households in the highest income quintile accounted for a disproportionate share of the consumer market for entertainment services in 2001.

    The presence of children in the household made a real difference in spending patterns. Households with children represented the highest percentage of reporting households in seven of the eight categories of entertainment spending and, on average, they spent the most in six of the eight categories.

    Release date: 2004-01-13

Data (3)

Data (3) (3 results)

Analysis (15)

Analysis (15) (15 of 15 results)

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2004023
    Description:

    This article estimates and analyses the economic impact of the culture sector on Canada's employment and gross domestic product (GDP).

    Release date: 2004-12-02

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2004024
    Description:

    This paper analyses the impact of the culture sector on Ontario's gross domestic product (GDP) and employment.

    Release date: 2004-12-02

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2004025
    Description:

    This article estimates and analyses the impact of the culture sector on provincial employment and gross domestic product (GDP).

    Release date: 2004-12-02

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040037431
    Description:

    This article describes the continued resiliency of the radio industry, which has survived television as well as personal stereos such as the Sony Walkman and MP3 players.

    Release date: 2004-10-29

  • Articles and reports: 89-613-M2004004
    Description:

    The report examines culture in census metropolitan areas (CMAs) in 2001. The report uses the 1996 and 2001 censuses, and data from Statistics Canada's Culture Statistics Program and the Centre for Education Statistics.

    Release date: 2004-10-22

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2004021
    Description:

    This paper presents a conceptual basis for defining culture using Statistics Canada's classification systems. The 2004 Canadian Framework for Culture Statistics has been revised. A new publication series on the Canadian Framework for Culture Statistics 2011 (Catalogue 87-542-X) is now available.

    Release date: 2004-08-23

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2004020
    Description:

    This article discusses the collection and interpretation of statistical data on Canada's trade in culture goods. It defines the products that are included in culture trade and explains how appropriate products are selected from the relevant classification standards.

    This version has been replaced by Culture Goods Trade Data User Guide, Catalogue No. 81-595-MIE2006040.

    Release date: 2004-07-28

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20020046977
    Description:

    The article discusses the diverse factors that influence the choice of location for film production, the role of governments in promoting the film industry and the challenges Canada faces in attracting film projects in an industry where many localities, both within and outside Canada, compete for the available production dollars.

    Release date: 2004-07-08

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20020046980
    Description:

    This article examines the trade in cultural goods between Canada and Cuba and discusses Canada's trade surplus with Cuba.

    Release date: 2004-07-08

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20020046979
    Description:

    This article examines how people spend their leisure time and compares participation rates for various leisure activities internationally. The article looks at leisure activities such as reading, television viewing, radio listening, attendance at cultural activities, using the Internet and playing computer games. Income level, education, age, labour force activity and household type are taken into consideration when making international comparisons of how people spend their free time.

    Release date: 2004-07-08

  • Articles and reports: 75-001-X20031126700
    Description:

    This document examines the effects of gambling in today's society.

    Release date: 2004-03-19

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20040016795
    Description:

    From the early 1950s to the mid-1990s, cable companies were the only businesses offering multi-channel video services, and these services represented much of their revenues. The penetration of cable services grew steadily over the period and peaked in the early 1990s. The introduction of competition from wireless operators has given new life to the industry and its clientele has expanded by more than 20% from 1997 to 2002. Wireless operator companies, which had virtually no customers in 1997, have captured a substantial share of the multi-channel video market. Cable operators have diversified and now play a major role in the Internet access market. Digital technology is gradually displacing analogue technologies.

    Release date: 2004-03-05

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20020036754
    Description:

    This article examines some of the many factors that influence the well-being of Canada's culture sector and its workforce: the country's general economic conditions; government programs and policies; and consumer demand, of both domestic and imported culture goods and services.

    The forces of economic, social, political and technological change are radically transforming the world of culture and its labour force. The 1980s saw a rapid expansion of the culture workforce to meet increased demand for culture goods and services. This period of growth paused with the 1990/91 recession: jobs, earnings and revenues all fell off. With the end of the recession, the labour market rebounded and culture workers rode this high employment wave throughout the remainder of the decade.

    Countries have become more conscious of the role that culture plays in their development, their identity and the sustenance of their value systems. In many countries culture sectors are now targets of international economic development policies. Global trade and the continued high demand in Canada for imported culture goods and services make the culture economy in this country (and, in turn, employment in the culture sector) variable and highly competitive.

    Release date: 2004-01-13

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20020036767
    Description:

    When it comes to cultural or artistic products such as sculptures and paintings, Italy has centuries of rich cultural heritage to draw upon. Thus, it comes as no small surprise that Italy is a major source for culture goods imports to Canada. From 1996 to 2002, Italy was ranked sixth in terms of Canada's suppliers of culture goods.

    Imports from Italy had previously been flat or declining until 2001, but jumped 72% year-to-year in 2002. The increase came despite a sizable appreciation of the Euro against the Canadian dollar. Since spending on culture goods tends to increase with income, it is possible that Canada's growth in disposable income and consumer spending since 2001 contributed to this jump.

    Release date: 2004-01-13

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20020036755
    Description:

    This article examines household spending on entertainment services in 2001, focussing on differences in spending by household type and income. Entertainment services industries rely on spending by various types of households. Knowledge about the characteristics of consumers and their spending patterns enables entertainment service providers to market their products to meet the needs of the current market, and to develop programs to attract new consumers.

    Previous research looking at differences in spending on entertainment services has shown that consumer preferences vary across socio-economic factors such as income, household type and geographical region. Similar to entertainment spending patterns in 1997, there was evidence that Canadians continued to 'cocoon' in 2001, spending more on entertainment inside the home and less outside the home.

    Spending on entertainment services also varied by level of household income. It is not surprising that both the percentage of households that spent on entertainment and the average amount spent increased with income. Households in the highest income quintile accounted for a disproportionate share of the consumer market for entertainment services in 2001.

    The presence of children in the household made a real difference in spending patterns. Households with children represented the highest percentage of reporting households in seven of the eight categories of entertainment spending and, on average, they spent the most in six of the eight categories.

    Release date: 2004-01-13

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