Statistics by subject – Culture and leisure

Other available resources to support your research.

Help for sorting results
Browse our central repository of key standard concepts, definitions, data sources and methods.
Loading
Loading in progress, please wait...
All (13)

All (13) (13 of 13 results)

  • Table: 56-001-X20060049524
    Description:

    The statistics presented in this bulletin are for the year ending on August 31 and for the period from 2002 to 2005. The following text contains references to previous periods when it is useful to set the industry's performance in a historical context.

    Release date: 2006-11-20

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20030049503
    Description:

    Using data from the Survey of Household Spending (SHS), this article explores household spending on culture goods and services over a five year period, from 1999 to 2004, and examines differences in average spending by household type.

    Release date: 2006-11-02

  • Table: 56-001-X20060039299
    Description:

    The statistics presented in this Bulletin are for the fiscal year ending August 31 and cover the period from 2002 to 2005. The text includes references to earlier periods when it is useful to put the industry's recent performance in a historical context.

    Release date: 2006-08-22

  • Table: 56-001-X20060029282
    Description:

    The statistics presented in this Bulletin are for the fiscal year ending August 31 and cover the period from 2002 to 2005.

    Release date: 2006-07-26

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X2006050
    Description:

    In recent years, while Canadians have spent more on entertainment at home, there has concurrently been an increase in demand for entertainment outside the home. The entertainment services outside the home discussed in this article include attendance at movie theatres, performing arts and spectator sports events and admissions to heritage institutions. This shift in preferences along with growth in incomes, population and prices caused the consumer market for entertainment services to expand from $2.3 billion in 1998 to $3.2 billion in 2003, an increase of 41%.

    Based primarily on Survey of Household Spending data from 1998 and 2003, this article examines changes over the five year period in household spending on entertainment services. In particular, it investigates how spending changed in each province and for some household types and each household income quintile. It also looks at how the performance of entertainment services providers may have been affected by such changes. As the entertainment services market grows, the providers of these services face the challenge of retaining existing customers and attracting new ones. Knowing how consumer characteristics such as income, type of household and geographical location affect entertainment spending can enable suppliers to better provide and market their services.

    Release date: 2006-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 63-018-X20060029223
    Description:

    In recent years, while Canadians have spent more on entertainment at home, there has concurrently been an increase in demand for entertainment outside the home. The entertainment services outside the home discussed in this article include attendance at movie theatres, performing arts and spectator sports events and admissions to heritage institutions. This shift in preferences along with growth in incomes, population and prices caused the consumer market for entertainment services to expand from $2.3 billion in 1998 to $3.2 billion in 2003, an increase of 41%.

    Based primarily on Survey of Household Spending data from 1998 and 2003, this article examines changes over the five year period in household spending on entertainment services. In particular, it investigates how spending changed in each province and for some household types and each household income quintile. It also looks at how the performance of entertainment services providers may have been affected by such changes. As the entertainment services market grows, the providers of these services face the challenge of retaining existing customers and attracting new ones. Knowing how consumer characteristics such as income, type of household and geographical location affect entertainment spending can enable suppliers to better provide and market their services.

    Release date: 2006-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2005008
    Description:

    The objective of this paper is to document the nature of culture employment in rural Canada.

    Release date: 2006-06-12

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20030038997
    Description:

    The study evaluates and analyses the export of culture goods to China and Canada's imports from China.

    Release date: 2006-06-12

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20030039213
    Description:

    The Culture Statistics Program (CSP) has been Statistic Canada's chief source for analysis of the culture sector since the program's inception in 1972 and this role will continue. However, the CSP is making substantial changes to the way it collects culture data and, in effect, the data themselves. This article is intended to inform users of these data, of the scope of these upcoming changes and how the CSP is managing the challenges presented by this transition.

    Release date: 2006-06-12

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2006040
    Description:

    This guide discusses the collection and interpretation of statistical data on Canada's trade in culture goods. This guide has been restructured and simplified to better meet the needs of data users. This version replaces Culture Goods Trade Estimates: Methodology and Technical Notes, Catalogue no. 81-595-MIE2004020.

    Release date: 2006-03-30

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2006038
    Description:

    This report examines selected culture industries in Ontario and recent trends in the supply of and demand for culture goods and services.

    Release date: 2006-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060019108
    Description:

    Just as the cable industry was poised to realize the full extent of investments made in its networks by offering local telephony in a number of Canadian markets, it seems to have put an end to the erosion of its traditional customer base. This may be a sign that the industry is reaping the benefits of a customer loyalty strategy founded on product and technological innovation.

    Release date: 2006-02-27

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060019107
    Description:

    Some technological innovations are more apparent than others; the introduction of digital satellite television and wireless cable was one of the most obvious.

    Release date: 2006-02-27

Data (3)

Data (3) (3 results)

Analysis (10)

Analysis (10) (10 of 10 results)

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20030049503
    Description:

    Using data from the Survey of Household Spending (SHS), this article explores household spending on culture goods and services over a five year period, from 1999 to 2004, and examines differences in average spending by household type.

    Release date: 2006-11-02

  • Articles and reports: 63F0002X2006050
    Description:

    In recent years, while Canadians have spent more on entertainment at home, there has concurrently been an increase in demand for entertainment outside the home. The entertainment services outside the home discussed in this article include attendance at movie theatres, performing arts and spectator sports events and admissions to heritage institutions. This shift in preferences along with growth in incomes, population and prices caused the consumer market for entertainment services to expand from $2.3 billion in 1998 to $3.2 billion in 2003, an increase of 41%.

    Based primarily on Survey of Household Spending data from 1998 and 2003, this article examines changes over the five year period in household spending on entertainment services. In particular, it investigates how spending changed in each province and for some household types and each household income quintile. It also looks at how the performance of entertainment services providers may have been affected by such changes. As the entertainment services market grows, the providers of these services face the challenge of retaining existing customers and attracting new ones. Knowing how consumer characteristics such as income, type of household and geographical location affect entertainment spending can enable suppliers to better provide and market their services.

    Release date: 2006-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 63-018-X20060029223
    Description:

    In recent years, while Canadians have spent more on entertainment at home, there has concurrently been an increase in demand for entertainment outside the home. The entertainment services outside the home discussed in this article include attendance at movie theatres, performing arts and spectator sports events and admissions to heritage institutions. This shift in preferences along with growth in incomes, population and prices caused the consumer market for entertainment services to expand from $2.3 billion in 1998 to $3.2 billion in 2003, an increase of 41%.

    Based primarily on Survey of Household Spending data from 1998 and 2003, this article examines changes over the five year period in household spending on entertainment services. In particular, it investigates how spending changed in each province and for some household types and each household income quintile. It also looks at how the performance of entertainment services providers may have been affected by such changes. As the entertainment services market grows, the providers of these services face the challenge of retaining existing customers and attracting new ones. Knowing how consumer characteristics such as income, type of household and geographical location affect entertainment spending can enable suppliers to better provide and market their services.

    Release date: 2006-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 21-006-X2005008
    Description:

    The objective of this paper is to document the nature of culture employment in rural Canada.

    Release date: 2006-06-12

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20030038997
    Description:

    The study evaluates and analyses the export of culture goods to China and Canada's imports from China.

    Release date: 2006-06-12

  • Articles and reports: 87-004-X20030039213
    Description:

    The Culture Statistics Program (CSP) has been Statistic Canada's chief source for analysis of the culture sector since the program's inception in 1972 and this role will continue. However, the CSP is making substantial changes to the way it collects culture data and, in effect, the data themselves. This article is intended to inform users of these data, of the scope of these upcoming changes and how the CSP is managing the challenges presented by this transition.

    Release date: 2006-06-12

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2006040
    Description:

    This guide discusses the collection and interpretation of statistical data on Canada's trade in culture goods. This guide has been restructured and simplified to better meet the needs of data users. This version replaces Culture Goods Trade Estimates: Methodology and Technical Notes, Catalogue no. 81-595-MIE2004020.

    Release date: 2006-03-30

  • Articles and reports: 81-595-M2006038
    Description:

    This report examines selected culture industries in Ontario and recent trends in the supply of and demand for culture goods and services.

    Release date: 2006-03-08

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060019108
    Description:

    Just as the cable industry was poised to realize the full extent of investments made in its networks by offering local telephony in a number of Canadian markets, it seems to have put an end to the erosion of its traditional customer base. This may be a sign that the industry is reaping the benefits of a customer loyalty strategy founded on product and technological innovation.

    Release date: 2006-02-27

  • Articles and reports: 88-003-X20060019107
    Description:

    Some technological innovations are more apparent than others; the introduction of digital satellite television and wireless cable was one of the most obvious.

    Release date: 2006-02-27

Reference (0)

Reference (0) (0 results)

Your search for "" found no results in this section of the site.

You may try:

Browse our partners page to find a complete list of our partners and their associated products.

Date modified: