Statistics by subject – Gross domestic product

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  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-10-19

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017075
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series provides users with an integrated summary of recent changes in output, employment, household demand, international trade and prices. Organized as a statistical summary of major indicators, the report is designed to inform about recent developments in the Canadian economy, highlighting major changes in the economic data during the first two quarters of 2017 and into the summer months. Unless otherwise noted, the tabulations presented in this report are based on seasonally adjusted data available in CANSIM on October 6, 2017.

    Release date: 2017-10-19

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-09-29

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-08-31

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017074
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article reports on changes in the Canadian manufacturing sector since 2000. Using data from the Canadian System of National Accounts and the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, it provides an analysis of recent trends in Canadian manufacturing sector output, as well as a decomposition of the contribution of manufacturing industries to the evolution of the sector and a comparison with the United States.

    Release date: 2017-06-27

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-05-01

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-04-27

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-04-24

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017072
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series provides users with an integrated summary of recent changes in output, employment, household demand, international trade and prices. Organized as a statistical summary of major indicators, the report is designed to inform about recent developments in the Canadian economy, highlighting major changes in the economic data during the second half of 2016 and early 2017. Unless otherwise noted, the tabulations presented in this report are based on seasonally adjusted data available in CANSIM on April 7, 2017.

    Release date: 2017-04-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-627-M2017007
    Description:

    An overview of the repercussions of this natural disaster on current production, insurance payments, and future planned construction are presented along with other contextual data. From localized impacts to the national picture the data shows the very different impacts the wildfires had on industry and Canadian citizens. The infographic, Fort McMurray 2016 Wildfires - Economic Impact, presents information from multiple Statistics Canada surveys including the Labour Force Survey (LFS) and Gross Domestic Product by Industry (GDP).

    Release date: 2017-03-16

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-01-30

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2017-01-27

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-12-22

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2016065
    Description:

    The U.S.–Canada purchasing power parity (PPP) is a measure of the relative price level between Canada and the United States. It measures the difference, in dollars, that exists between the two countries for an individual or firm wishing to purchase an equivalent basket of goods and services in each country. This Economic Insights article presents quarterly estimates from Statistics Canada for the U.S.–Canada purchasing power parity. It is part of a series of research papers and articles that examine differences in price levels between Canada and the United States.

    Release date: 2016-12-22

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-11-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2016061
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series provides users with an integrated summary of recent changes in output, employment, household demand, international trade and prices. Organized as a statistical summary of major indicators, the report is designed to inform about recent developments in the Canadian economy, highlighting major changes in the economic data during late 2015 and early 2016. Unless otherwise noted, the tabulations presented in this report are based on seasonally adjusted data available in CANSIM on November 4, 2016.

    Release date: 2016-11-15

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-11-09

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2016-06-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2016058
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series provides users with an integrated summary of recent changes in output, employment, household demand, international trade and prices. Organized as a statistical summary of major indicators, the report is designed to inform about recent developments in the Canadian economy, highlighting major changes in the economic data during late 2015 and early 2016. Unless otherwise noted, the tabulations presented in this report are based on seasonally adjusted data available in CANSIM on April 29, 2016.

    Release date: 2016-05-16

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2015-12-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-629-X2015034
    Description:

    This video details Gross Domestic Product (GDP).

    Release date: 2015-12-01

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2015053
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series provides users with an integrated summary of recent changes in output, employment, household demand, international trade and prices. Organized as a statistical summary of major indicators, the report is designed to inform about recent developments in the Canadian economy, highlighting major changes in the economic data during first two quarters of 2015 and into the summer months. Unless otherwise noted, the tabulations presented in this report are based on seasonally adjusted data available in CANSIM on November 5, 2015.

    Release date: 2015-11-12

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2015048
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series reports on the capital expenditure estimates for 2014 and the expenditure intentions for 2015, released by Statistics Canada on July 6th 2015. The article examines changes in the pace and composition of non-residential capital spending, highlighting key movements in the data for these reference years.

    Release date: 2015-07-06

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2015043
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series provides users with an integrated summary of recent changes in output, employment, household demand, international trade and prices. Organized as a statistical summary of major indicators, the report is designed to inform about recent developments in the Canadian economy, highlighting major changes in the economic data during late 2014 and early 2015. Unless otherwise noted, the tabulations presented in this report are based on seasonally adjusted data available in CANSIM on May 5, 2015.

    Release date: 2015-05-07

Reference (25)

Reference (25) (25 of 25 results)

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 1301
    Release date: 2017-09-29

  • Technical products: 15F0046X
    Description:

    The input-output multipliers are derived from the supply and use tables. They are used to assess the effects on the economy of an exogenous change in final demand for the output of a given industry. They provide a measure of the interdependence between an industry and the rest of the economy.

    The national and provincial multipliers show the direct, indirect, and induced effects on gross output, the detailed components of GDP, jobs, and imports. Like the supply and use tables, the multipliers are presented at four levels of aggregation: Detail level (236 industries), Link-1997 level (187 industries), Link-1961 level (111 industries) and Summary level (35 industries).

    National and provincial multipliers were not released in 2015 and 2016.

    Release date: 2017-06-09

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 5103
    Release date: 2017-05-19

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2014036
    Description:

    Leasing is an important means of gaining access to assets, of obtaining finance, and of reducing a lessee’s exposure to the risks inherent to asset ownership. A lease can be either a financial lease (capital lease) or an operating lease (capital rental). A financial lease is one where the legal owner of an asset (lessor) passes the economic ownership to the user of the asset (lessee), who then accepts the operating risks and receives the economic benefits from using the asset in a productive activity. Under an operating lease, the lessor is both the legal owner and the economic owner of the asset leased (rented), bearing the operating risks and receiving the economic benefits from the asset. The lessor transfers only the right to use the asset to the lessee.

    Leasing offers firms the possibility to acquire the right to use capital assets under terms that differ from those prevailing through other financial instruments. The recording of leased assets in the Canadian System of National Accounts is ownership-based rather than user-based. The separation of capital ownership, in particular legal ownership, from the use of capital assets poses challenges to productivity measurement. To obtain consistent productivity measures at an industry level, leased and rented capital assets must be reallocated from owners’ accounts to users’ accounts. By using the General Index of Financial Information (GIFI) corporate balance sheets and detailed input-output tables, this paper tests the robustness of existing practices of data collection on leased and rented capital.

    Release date: 2014-07-22

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2014035
    Description:

    This paper highlights revisions to multifactor productivity (MFP) growth and related variables in the business sector and in individual industries, which resulted from the historical revision of the Canadian System of National Accounts (CSNA) released October 1, 2012, revisions to the labour productivity accounts released October 12, 2012, and changes in the estimation of capital input that were made in order to improve its consistency in industry MFP growth estimates.

    The multifactor productivity program produces indexes of MFP and related measures (output, capital input, labour input and intermediate inputs) for the business sector, broad economic sub-sectors, and their constituent industries. The MFP program divides growth in labour productivity into its key determinants: capital intensity (changes in capital per hour worked), investment in human capital, and MFP, which includes technological change, organizational innovation and economies of scale.

    Release date: 2014-07-08

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2012029
    Description:

    Intangible capital consists of investments that do not take on the solid, physical characteristics of machinery and equipment or buildings. Nevertheless, such investments have some of the properties of other types of investments in that they yield long-lasting benefits as a result of expenditures that are made today. In the National Accounts, these expenditures need to be capitalized rather than expensed as intermediate materials for purposes of estimating gross domestic product (GDP).

    Recent papers have considered issues surrounding the measurement of intangibles. Baldwin et al. (2005) discussed issues surrounding research and development (R&D). They noted that R&D is only one of the components of innovation expenditures. Baldwin et al. (2009) extended the measurement of intangible investments beyond that of just R&D. At the heart of intangible investments, of course, are software and R&D. However, intangible investments also consist of purchased science services, own-account scientific services, exploration expenses in the resource sector, and advertising expenditures, because these create an intangible asset and yield long-term benefits.

    This paper extends the authors' previous work in three ways. First, it expands it into several new areas--what are referred to as economic competencies. These involve primarily investments in human capital--via management and training investments as well as management consulting services. This not only provides broader coverage; it also allows cross-country comparisons of Canada to the United States.

    Second, this paper moves from just measuring investment to also developing capital stock estimates. This requires assumptions about depreciation rates. In both instances, the paper adopts assumptions similar to those used elsewhere in developing estimates for the United States, in order to ensure comparability.

    Third, the paper incorporates the estimates of intangible capital into the growth-accounting framework so as to understand how it is related to productivity growth. A comparison of Canada and the United States in this regard is also provided.

    Release date: 2012-06-01

  • Index and guides: 13-017-X2008001
    Release date: 2008-06-30

  • Index and guides: 13-017-X
    Description:

    This guide focuses on the Income and Expenditure Accounts. It provides an overview, an outline of the concepts and definitions, an explanation of the sources of information and statistical methods, a glossary of terms, and a broad compilation of other facts about the accounts.

    Release date: 2008-06-30

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2007010
    Description:

    This paper examines the impact of the revisions to labour productivity estimates and related variables covering the revision cycle of the National Accounts from 2003 to 2006 for Canada and from 2004 to 2006 for the United States.

    Release date: 2007-11-27

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2007008
    Description:

    This study is the third in a series related to the project launched in fall 2003 by the Canadian Productivity Accounts of Statistics Canada in order to compare productivity levels between Canada and the United States. The study's purpose is to examine the comparability of the components of the labour market of these two countries that serve as the sources of the differences in the gross domestic product (GDP) per capita between them. This study can be subdivided into three sections. The first section develops and illustrates the conceptual and methodological framework required to make Canada/United States estimates of labour and population comparable in terms of level. The second section presents revisions and an update to 2005 of the GDP per capita differences and its components, which were presented for the first time in the study by Baldwin, Maynard and Wong (2005), which covered the period from 1994 to 2002, at the time.

    Lastly, using the year 2000 as an example, this study tries to quantify the "statistical error" that arises from using inadequate statistics or statistics not designed for this type of international comparison. This exercise reveals that the comparability of data on hours worked per job is especially crucial to identifying the origin of the differences in GDP per capita between labour productivity and hours worked per capita. The worst error involves comparing hours worked estimated from an employer survey with those obtained from a household survey. This type of comparison between Canada and the United States results in assigning an estimated 72% of the difference in GDP per capita to labour productivity when, in reality, it counted for barely 36% in 2000.

    Release date: 2007-03-26

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2006003
    Description:

    This paper examines the revision cycle for labour productivity estimates over the period 2001 to 2004.

    Release date: 2006-10-11

  • Technical products: 13F0031M
    Description:

    This series includes four reports which are the first set of documents relating to the changes made in the The 1997 historical revision of the Canadian System of National Accounts.

    Release date: 2003-06-20

  • Technical products: 15-547-X
    Description:

    Like most statistical agencies, Statistics Canada publishes three Gross Domestic Product (GDP) series. These are the output-based GDP, the income-based GDP and the expenditure-based GDP. This document is aimed at describing the concepts, definitions, classifications and statistical methods underlying the output-based GDP series, also known as GDP by industry or simply monthly GDP.

    The report is organized into seven chapters. Chapter 1 defines what GDP by industry is, describes its various uses and how it connects with the other components of the Canadian System of National Accounts. Chapter 2 deals with the calculation of the GDP by industry estimates. Chapter 3 examines industry and commodity classification schemes. Chapter 4 discusses the subject of deflation. The choice of deflators, the role of the base year and the method of rebasing are all addressed in this chapter. Chapter 5 looks at such technical issues as benchmarking, trading day and seasonal adjustment. Chapter 6 is devoted to the presentation of the GDP by industry, detailing the format, release dates and modes of dissemination, as well as the need and the frequency of revising the estimates. Finally, Chapter 7 reviews the historical development of monthly GDP from 1926 to the present.

    Release date: 2002-11-29

  • Technical products: 13F0031M2001009
    Description:

    The work on Input-output (IO) tables in Canada started in the early 1960s. At the very beginning, it was decided that IO tables must fulfill several roles and provide: (a) an audit and management tool to improve economic statistics for their consistency, accuracy and comprehensiveness; (b) benchmarks for gross domestic product (GDP), its income side and components, its expenditures side and components and GDP by industry estimates, both at current prices and constant prices and (c) a framework for structural analysis.

    Release date: 2001-04-10

  • Technical products: 13F0031M2001008
    Description:

    Under any degree of inflation, high or low, the values of changes in inventories (VPC) is generally different when it is calculated at the quarterly interval and the four quarters are aggregated into a year compared with its calculation done at the yearly interval. It is argued in this paper that it is an inherent problem as one of the basic axioms of annual accounts is violated, namely, the assumption of price homogeneity over an accounting period.

    Release date: 2001-03-16

  • Technical products: 13F0031M2000002
    Description:

    This paper deals with a problem in internationally comparable economic statistics, namely, the fact that countries measure value added by industry differently. The economic measure, value added, is important both in its own right and because it is a component of other economic measures such as productivity. Value added by industry measures the additional value created by a production process. This additional value, created by factors of production such as labour and capital, may be calculated either before or after deducting the consumption of fixed capital used in production. Thus, gross value added by industry is the value of its output of goods and services less the value of its intermediate consumption of goods and services and net value added as the value of output less the values of both intermediate consumption and consumption of fixed capital.

    Release date: 2000-04-04

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 1302
    Release date: 1998-09-30

  • Technical products: 13F0031M2000001
    Description:

    The 1993 System of National Accounts (SNA) was implemented in Canada in November 1997 and all national accounts series - annual, quarterly and monthly, both at current and constant prices - were revised back to 1961. There were changes in classification of sectors and transactions, concepts and methodology. As well, we removed the statistical breaks in earlier series that arose due to our revision policy. In the spring of every year, we revise, if necessary, our national accounts series for the latest four years. Statistical breaks for earlier periods are removed only at the time of historical revisions, such as the one done in November 1997. This was the fifth and the most comprehensive historical revision of the Canadian SNA series since 1961, the earlier ones were done in the late 1960s, the late 1970s, in 1985 and in 1990. As our historical revisions have been done almost every decade, and more frequently since the 1980s, statistical breaks in the Canadian system have remained only for a short period.

    Release date: 1998-04-01

  • Technical products: 13F0031M2000003
    Description:

    This report examines the 1997 Canadian System of National Accounts (CSNA) and highlights the remaining differences from the 1993 SNA, thus providing a better understanding of the Canadian System vis-à-vis that of other countries. Our occasional departures from the 1993 SNA guidelines are primarily prompted by pragmatic considerations, such as institutional structure, statistical data sources, availability of resources and their cost-effective use.

    Release date: 1998-04-01

  • Technical products: 13F0031M2000004
    Description:

    The changes made in this historical revision elaborate on the changes, over one hundred in all, made in the accounts. This paper updates an earlier report issued in August 1996 in several ways: decisions which did not involve any change in the accounts were pruned out; several new issues were added and many decisions were rewritten.

    Release date: 1998-04-01

  • Technical products: 13F0031M2000005
    Description:

    This report presents the changes made to one of the most important series, the current price gross domestic product (GDP). It includes 13 tables, one for each of the following topics:

    personal expenditure on consumer goods and services;government current expenditure on goods and services; gross fixed capital formation, residential structures;gross fixed capital formation, non-residential structures;gross fixed capital formation, machinery and equipment;exports and imports of goods and services;wages, salaries and supplementary labour income; net income of unincorporated business; indirect taxes;subsidies; current price GDP expenditure; current price GDP income; and GDP changes, significant Items.

    Release date: 1998-04-01

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 7522

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