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  • Table: Summary table
    Release date: 2017-10-20

  • Journals and periodicals: 11-621-M
    Description:

    The papers published in the Analysis in Brief analytical series shed light on current economic issues. Aimed at a general audience, they cover a wide range of topics including National Accounts, business enterprises, trade, transportation, agriculture, the environment, manufacturing, science and technology, services, etc.

    Release date: 2017-09-12

  • Journals and periodicals: 11-010-X
    Description:

    This monthly periodical is Statistics Canada's flagship publication for economic statistics. Each issue contains a monthly summary of the economy, major economic events and a feature article. A statistical summary contains a wide range of tables and graphs on the principal economic indicators for Canada, the provinces and the major industrial nations. A historical listing of this same data is contained in the Canadian economic observer: historical supplement (Catalogue no. 11-210-XPB and XIB).

    Release date: 2012-06-22

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2012-06-15

  • The Daily
    Description: Release published in The Daily – Statistics Canada’s official release bulletin
    Release date: 2012-05-23

  • Table: Summary table
    Release date: 2012-05-23

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 1601
    Release date: 2012-05-23

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20070049615
    Description:

    Canadians proved increasingly adaptable to the changes in the economy, moving to Alberta in increasing numbers to find jobs while at the same time responding to the challenge of an aging population and globalization.

    Release date: 2007-04-12

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2007007
    Description:

    Productivity statistics garner much attention because they are key indicators of economic progress. This paper reports on the average growth in provincial labour productivity from 1997 to 2005. It examines how medium-term differences in productivity growth have affected the relative levels of labour productivity in different provinces. The data show that the relative position of most provinces has remained fairly stable over the 1997-to-2005 period when benchmarked against changes in the national average. The notable exception is Newfoundland and Labrador, which experienced much stronger average productivity growth during this period than other provinces. This growth substantially improved its relative labour productivity when evaluated in real terms.

    The paper also examines the effect that a second factor - changes in the prices received for products - has had on nominal productivity differences between provinces. The data show that the resource-rich provinces of Alberta and Newfoundland and Labrador have benefited substantially from higher relative prices.

    Release date: 2007-01-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20060119518
    Description:

    Since 2002, the trade surplus has been buttressed by high prices for energy and metals, the only areas where exports were growing. Falling exports and strong domestic demand has reduced the trade balance in all other sectors, notably autos and consumer investment goods.

    Release date: 2006-11-09

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20060099298
    Description:

    Alberta's 4-year old surge, driven by the energy sector, is unprecedented in Canadian economic history. An in-depth look at the consequences of this growth, especially for its labour market, the tightest in North America.

    Release date: 2006-09-14

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2006045
    Description:

    This report highlights trends in manufacturing for 2005. It focuses on shipments by industry and provinces. It also examines recent movements of other key variables such as employment, profits, capital investment, capacity utilization and productivity.

    Release date: 2006-06-28

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20060059196
    Description:

    This article looks at some of the reasons behind the recent rebound in the British Columbia economy from its doldrums in the 1990s. It also examines how the current boom in British Columbia differs from Alberta and what can be learned from Alberta's experience.

    Release date: 2006-05-11

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20060049178
    Description:

    Canada has reverted to its more traditional orientation over the last three years, as prophecies of a new, tech-driven economy have not been realized. Surging demand and prices for energy and mining products was the dominant theme of the year. All regions benefited from these changes.

    Release date: 2006-04-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20060049179
    Description:

    After having run deficits for almost 30 years, corporations have emerged with significant surplus positions in the last decade. This has placed the corporate sector in a new role - that of increasingly supplying funds to the rest of the economy.

    Release date: 2006-04-13

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2006035
    Description:

    This study looks at the average age of the four main components of public infrastructure in Canada: roads and highways, sewer systems, wastewater treatment facilities, and bridges. This study covers the 1963 to 2003 period for the three levels of government.

    Release date: 2006-01-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20060019000
    Description:

    Revenue multipliers show most industries outsourced more of their inputs to other industries in recent years, especially business services. But this outsourcing does not capture each industry's impact on GDP. These output multipliers are quite different from revenue multipliers.

    Release date: 2006-01-12

  • Technical products: 11F0024M2005000
    Description:

    The theme for this year focuses on, economic growth, the creation of wealth and sustainable development. In our rapidly changing economy the need for innovative solutions and creative research is increasingly important. As our global community constantly evolves we need to understand the social and economic forces which affect us all.

    The Economic Conference 2006 theme touches on several aspects of Canada's economic and social life and is addressed in four sub-themes. Authors are invited to submit papers on topics related to one of the sub-themes listed below:

    1. Innovation, Productivity and Investment: Business cycle; technological change; industrial organization; infrastructure; business practices; information and communication technology; eco-efficiency.

    2. Human, Social and Natural Capital: Aging; immigration; children; families; income distributions and low-income; social cohesion; social exclusion; literacy and other skills sets; health; education and learning; geographic mobility, natural resources and energy use; resource accounting.

    3. Global Interdependence, Emerging Markets and Regional Issues: trade; integration; multinationals; foreign direct investment; exchange rates; balance of payments; cities and smaller communities; threats to trade and development.

    4. Market and Social Outcomes: employment and unemployment; earnings and wages; outsourcing; social change; job stability and work activities.

    Release date: 2005-10-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20050098623
    Description:

    Cycles in business investment are a key determinant of overall growth, as they are longer-lasting and stronger than in other sectors. Canada is currently in the early stages of an upturn in investment, driven by the revival of the resource sector.

    Release date: 2005-09-15

  • Articles and reports: 11-621-M2005025
    Description:

    This study examines the performance of key industries in the manufacturing sector in each province in 2004, and the major factors influencing each.

    Release date: 2005-04-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-010-X20050047828
    Description:

    Growth improved in 2004, part of the world economy having its best year in almost 3 decades. The boom in commodities and the rising loonie sent the trade surplus to a new record and helped investment snap out of a 3-year slump. Energy, especially the tar sands, was a focal point of the upturn in resources. Housing also enjoyed another good year. Growth was evenly spread, with no major industry or province posting a loss last year.

    Release date: 2005-04-14

  • Technical products: 11F0024M2004000
    Description:

    The accelerating pace of technological, environmental and social change presents new challenges for the economy and society. Meeting these challenges requires their clear identification, accurate measurement and full understanding. Insightful research plays a key role in this process.

    On June 7 and 8, 2004, Statistics Canada will hold its fifteenth annual Economic conference. The Economic conference will bring together researchers from business, government, research and labour communities to shed light on current economic and social issues. This event will provide a stimulating and challenging environment for presenters and participants alike, promoting the exchange of ideas while subjecting empirical, theoretical and data issues to critical assessment.

    The Economic conference 2004 is your opportunity to sample new research, examine the latest ideas, engage in discussion and acquire new insights. The conference program brings together experts in the field of socio-economic research from across Canada and other countries to look at emerging issues in today's economy and society.

    The Economic conference 2004 will include several plenary sessions featuring invited guest speakers who are leading authorities in their fields. It will also include presentations in which participants will discuss research, providing new perspectives on topics related to one of the sub-themes listed below: - Economic growth - The changing face of Canada - The environment and economic activity - Infrastructure

    Release date: 2004-11-25

Data (10)

Data (10) (10 of 10 results)

Analysis (37)

Analysis (37) (25 of 37 results)

Reference (7)

Reference (7) (7 of 7 results)

  • Surveys and statistical programs – Documentation: 1601
    Release date: 2012-05-23

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2007007
    Description:

    Productivity statistics garner much attention because they are key indicators of economic progress. This paper reports on the average growth in provincial labour productivity from 1997 to 2005. It examines how medium-term differences in productivity growth have affected the relative levels of labour productivity in different provinces. The data show that the relative position of most provinces has remained fairly stable over the 1997-to-2005 period when benchmarked against changes in the national average. The notable exception is Newfoundland and Labrador, which experienced much stronger average productivity growth during this period than other provinces. This growth substantially improved its relative labour productivity when evaluated in real terms.

    The paper also examines the effect that a second factor - changes in the prices received for products - has had on nominal productivity differences between provinces. The data show that the resource-rich provinces of Alberta and Newfoundland and Labrador have benefited substantially from higher relative prices.

    Release date: 2007-01-15

  • Technical products: 11F0024M2005000
    Description:

    The theme for this year focuses on, economic growth, the creation of wealth and sustainable development. In our rapidly changing economy the need for innovative solutions and creative research is increasingly important. As our global community constantly evolves we need to understand the social and economic forces which affect us all.

    The Economic Conference 2006 theme touches on several aspects of Canada's economic and social life and is addressed in four sub-themes. Authors are invited to submit papers on topics related to one of the sub-themes listed below:

    1. Innovation, Productivity and Investment: Business cycle; technological change; industrial organization; infrastructure; business practices; information and communication technology; eco-efficiency.

    2. Human, Social and Natural Capital: Aging; immigration; children; families; income distributions and low-income; social cohesion; social exclusion; literacy and other skills sets; health; education and learning; geographic mobility, natural resources and energy use; resource accounting.

    3. Global Interdependence, Emerging Markets and Regional Issues: trade; integration; multinationals; foreign direct investment; exchange rates; balance of payments; cities and smaller communities; threats to trade and development.

    4. Market and Social Outcomes: employment and unemployment; earnings and wages; outsourcing; social change; job stability and work activities.

    Release date: 2005-10-20

  • Technical products: 11F0024M2004000
    Description:

    The accelerating pace of technological, environmental and social change presents new challenges for the economy and society. Meeting these challenges requires their clear identification, accurate measurement and full understanding. Insightful research plays a key role in this process.

    On June 7 and 8, 2004, Statistics Canada will hold its fifteenth annual Economic conference. The Economic conference will bring together researchers from business, government, research and labour communities to shed light on current economic and social issues. This event will provide a stimulating and challenging environment for presenters and participants alike, promoting the exchange of ideas while subjecting empirical, theoretical and data issues to critical assessment.

    The Economic conference 2004 is your opportunity to sample new research, examine the latest ideas, engage in discussion and acquire new insights. The conference program brings together experts in the field of socio-economic research from across Canada and other countries to look at emerging issues in today's economy and society.

    The Economic conference 2004 will include several plenary sessions featuring invited guest speakers who are leading authorities in their fields. It will also include presentations in which participants will discuss research, providing new perspectives on topics related to one of the sub-themes listed below: - Economic growth - The changing face of Canada - The environment and economic activity - Infrastructure

    Release date: 2004-11-25

  • Technical products: 11F0024M20040007449
    Description:

    The state and local government sector owns nearly 90% of the nonmilitary capital structures and 70% of the nonmilitary equipment in the U.S. As such state and local governments are the key policymakers in determining levels of infrastructure investment. Yet as stewards of infrastructure, the states have had a rocky history. Current engineering studies examining the condition of U.S. capital stock suggest that much of it is disrepair and that investments of nearly $1.6 trillion would be needed over the next 5 years to restore full functionality to major types of infrastructure.

    Recently states have shown renewed interest in using capital investment in infrastructure as an economic development tool. Popular economic development theories based on enhancing industry agglomeration often find the condition of key infrastructure as a factor in economic growth. While many states accept this conclusion, they are faced with a policy conundrum. Facing tight fiscal circumstances, states and localities are trying to determine which infrastructure investments matter in triggering economic growth. This paper will survey what is known about measuring the effect of infrastructure investment and discuss whether states are asking the right questions before spending infrastructure dollars.

    Release date: 2004-11-25

  • Technical products: 11F0024M20040007455
    Description:

    This paper provides an empirical analysis of the levels and trends in the industrial diversity of Canadian cities over the past 10 years (1992 to 2002), a period of significant structural change in the Canadian economy. Diverse cities are thought to be more stable and provide better environments that lead to stronger economic growth. Using detailed establishment-level data on businesses from the entire spectrum of small to large Canadian cities, the study shows that diversity levels vary significantly across cities, with the most populous cities being far more diverse than the least. Although there is a strong positive relationship between diversity and the population of a city, relatively small cities (those with a population around 100,000) can achieve levels of diversity that are near that of the largest urban centres. Consequently, most Canadians live in relatively diverse urban economic environments. Generally, the level of diversity of Canadian cities has increased over time. This has been particularly true of small cites with populations of less than 100,000. The largest cities have experienced declining diversity levels.

    Release date: 2004-11-25

  • Technical products: 11F0024M20040007448
    Description:

    This paper quantifies the contribution of public capital to productivity growth in the Canadian business sector. The approach developed here incorporates demand and supply forces, including the contribution of public capital, which may affect productivity performance. We estimate the model using disaggregated data composed of 37-industries in the Canadian business sector from 1961 to 2000. The results indicate that the main contributors to productivity growth, both at the industry and aggregate levels, are technical change and exogenous demand (representing the effect of aggregate income and population growth). Public capital contributed for about 18% of the overall business sector multifactor productivity growth over the 1961 to 2000 period. This is somewhat lower than the figures reported in the literature. However, the magnitudes of the contribution of public capital to productivity growth vary significantly across industries, with the largest impact occurring in transportation, trade and utilities.

    Release date: 2004-11-25

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