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  • Journals and periodicals: 11-627-M
    Description:

    Every year, Statistics Canada collects data from hundreds of surveys. As the amount of data gathered increases, Statistics Canada has introduced infographics to help people, business owners, academics, and management at all levels, understand key information derived from the data. Infographics can be used to quickly communicate a message, to simplify the presentation of large amounts of data, to see data patterns and relationships, and to monitor changes in variables over time.

    These infographics will provide a quick overview of Statistics Canada survey data.

    Release date: 2017-10-18

  • Journals and periodicals: 11-631-X
    Description:

    Statistics Canada engages regularly with Canadians to discuss statistical findings about the country’s economy, society and environment. Events are held in various cities throughout the year to discuss the use of statistics in many fields. These events provide Statistics Canada with an opportunity to promote the role of official statistics and better understand data users’ needs.

    This series provides online access to the presentations that were made at outreach events with data users.

    Release date: 2017-10-17

  • Articles and reports: 11-631-X2017003
    Description:

    While Statistics Canada has data on virtually every aspect of the Canadian economy – as well as our society and the environment, this presentation focuses on providing some insights on recent trends in the Canadian economy. Statistics Canada publishes a great deal of economic data that is closely studied to understand the extent to which the economy is growing and changing – and how these changes are distributed across provinces, industries and different segments of the population.

    Release date: 2017-10-17

  • Journals and periodicals: 13-605-X
    Description:

    This product contains articles related to the latest methodological, conceptual developments in the Canadian System of Macroeconomic Accounts as well as the analysis of the Canadian economy. It includes articles detailing new methods, concepts and statistical techniques used to compile the Canadian System of Macroeconomic Accounts. It also includes information related to new or expanded data products, provides updates and supplements to information found in various guides and analytical articles touching upon a broad range of topics related to the Canadian economy.

    Release date: 2017-10-13

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201700154868
    Description:

    With Canadian companies increasingly engaged in the global economy there is a growing demand for more detailed information on their international activities to better understand how Canadian businesses are expanding internationally and what the benefits and consequences are for Canada.

    Release date: 2017-10-13

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201700154867
    Description:

    Updated benchmarks from the 2012 Canadian Tourism Satellite Account (CTSA) were incorporated. Other sources of new and revised data and selected methodological changes were also introduced. This article will focus mostly on revisions beginning in 2012, the reference year of the most recent CTSA.

    Release date: 2017-10-13

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2017399
    Description:

    Canada is a trading nation that produces significant quantities of resource outputs. Consequently, the behaviour of resource prices that are important for Canada is germane to understanding the progress of real income growth and the prosperity of the country and the provinces. Demand and supply shocks or changes in monetary policy in international markets may exert significant influence on resource prices, and their fluctuations constitute an important avenue for the transmission of external shocks into the domestic economy. This paper develops historical estimates of the Bank of Canada commodity price index (BCPI) and links them to modern estimates. Using a collection of historical data sources, it estimates weights and prices sufficiently consistently to merit the construction of long-run estimates that may be linked to the modern Fisher BCPI.

    Release date: 2017-10-11

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201700114839
    Description:

    Users of macroeconomic statistics require long time series in order to understand economic cycles, forecast and conduct economic modeling. In general the longer the time series the better users are able to understand the economy. Statistics Canada has been producing macroeconomic account statistics since the 1930s. Over the last 80 plus years these statistics have evolved due to the changing nature of the economy, the development of international macroeconomic accounting standards and the development of new statistical methods and processes.

    Release date: 2017-09-18

  • Articles and reports: 11F0019M2017394
    Description:

    For many goods, such as dairy products and alcoholic beverages, the presence of substantial (non-tariff) barriers to provincial trade is widely recognized. If these non-tariff barriers matter, intraprovincial trade should be stronger than interprovincial trade, all else being equal. However, comparing intraprovincial and interprovincial trade levels is challenging, because intraprovincial trade is heavily skewed toward short-distance flows. When these are not properly taken into account by gravity-based trade models, intraprovincial trade levels—provincial border effects—tend to be overestimated.

    Release date: 2017-09-14

  • Journals and periodicals: 11-621-M
    Description:

    The papers published in the Analysis in Brief analytical series shed light on current economic issues. Aimed at a general audience, they cover a wide range of topics including National Accounts, business enterprises, trade, transportation, agriculture, the environment, manufacturing, science and technology, services, etc.

    Release date: 2017-09-12

  • Journals and periodicals: 11-626-X
    Description:

    Articles in the Economic Insights series highlight issues related to the growth and development of Canada's economy. In some cases, these articles synthesize the results of previous research carried out by Statistics Canada; in others, they provide contextual information that accompanies the release of new data. The Economic Insights series features concise examinations of economic events, trends, and important structural changes in the economy.

    Release date: 2017-06-27

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017074
    Description:

    This Economic Insights article reports on changes in the Canadian manufacturing sector since 2000. Using data from the Canadian System of National Accounts and the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, it provides an analysis of recent trends in Canadian manufacturing sector output, as well as a decomposition of the contribution of manufacturing industries to the evolution of the sector and a comparison with the United States.

    Release date: 2017-06-27

  • Journals and periodicals: 13-604-M
    Description:

    These papers provide background information as well as in depth analysis on data reported in any of the following accounts: income and expenditure accounts, provincial economic accounts, financial flow accounts, national balance sheet accounts, estimates of labour income, and national tourism indicators.

    Release date: 2017-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2017086
    Description:

    The natural resources sector is an important part of the Canadian economic landscape. It plays a significant role in Canada’s economic growth, employment and investment. The development of new mines, energy sources, oil and gas reserves, as well as forest products, have led to the sector’s increasingly important role in Canada’s overall economic development. The sector is often an important driver of economic growth and is a key influence on regional economic performance. Given the importance of this sector, policymakers, researchers, businesses and households require comprehensive and timely statistics in order to assess the evolution, structure, role and contribution of this sector to the Canadian economy.

    Release date: 2017-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201700114841
    Description:

    Trade patterns with the U.S. on a regional basis highlight the integration of industries between the two countries; proximity, transport infrastructure and government policy have all contributed to these interdependencies. Indeed, for the year 2016, 11 of Canada’s top 20 trading partners were U.S. states.

    Release date: 2017-06-19

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201700114838
    Description:

    The Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change (Pan-Canadian Framework) was introduced by the Government of Canada in 2016, in effort to combat climate change (Environment and Climate Change Canada). Under the framework, Canadian jurisdictions are required to price carbon emissions by 2018.

    Release date: 2017-05-31

  • Articles and reports: 16-002-X201700114825
    Description:

    Natural resources play an important role in the Canadian economy because their extraction forms a significant component of Canada’s current income. Currently Canada’s natural resource asset accounts include energy resources, mineral resources and timber. The monetary value of a natural resource asset can be derived using several approaches such as market price, replacement cost and the net present value generated from the resource.

    This study summarizes the methods used to integrate the value of selected natural resource assets into Canada’s quarterly national balance sheet accounts. It also explains the need to incorporate natural resource assets to provide a more comprehensive picture of Canada’s wealth. Data sources used include the quarterly national balance sheet accounts and the annual natural resource asset accounts.

    Release date: 2017-05-30

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201700114837
    Description:

    On January 6, 2017, the U.S. International Trade Commission ruled that they believe there is preliminary evidence that American producers are materially injured by imports of softwood lumber products from Canada. Subsequently, on April 24, 2017, the U.S. Department of Commerce announced its affirmative preliminary determination on the countervailing duty investigation.

    Release date: 2017-05-30

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2017085
    Description:

    This paper describes new estimates that are an extension of the existing Stock and Consumption of Fixed Capital Program (SCFC) and provide a short historical time series on a variety of asset classes. The main benefit of this product is that it provides information on the relationship between the timing and average age of infrastructure investments and their associated expected service lives, providing additional information on Canada’s infrastructure. It is not an all-inclusive assessment of the state of the infrastructure stock in Canada and data gaps remain. However, if interpreted correctly, they can provide useful information about requirements for infrastructure and non-infrastructure asset investment. Used as a benchmark to understand capital spending deficits or surpluses, changes over time can indicate when and where investment is required, in the context of the fiscal, economic and demographic landscape.

    Release date: 2017-05-15

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2017083
    Description:

    Statistics Canada regularly publishes macroeconomic indicators on household assets, liabilities and net worth as part of the quarterly National Balance Sheet Accounts (NBSA). These accounts are aligned with the most recent international standards and are the source of estimates of national wealth for all sectors of the economy, including households, non-profit institutions, governments and corporations along with Canada’s wealth position vis-a-vis the rest of the world. While the NBSA provide high quality information on the overall position of households relative to other economic sectors, they lack the granularity required to understand vulnerabilities of specific groups and the resulting implications for economic wellbeing and financial stability.

    Release date: 2017-04-25

  • Articles and reports: 11-626-X2017072
    Description:

    This article in the Economic Insights series provides users with an integrated summary of recent changes in output, employment, household demand, international trade and prices. Organized as a statistical summary of major indicators, the report is designed to inform about recent developments in the Canadian economy, highlighting major changes in the economic data during the second half of 2016 and early 2017. Unless otherwise noted, the tabulations presented in this report are based on seasonally adjusted data available in CANSIM on April 7, 2017.

    Release date: 2017-04-20

  • Articles and reports: 11-631-X2017001
    Description:

    This presentation focuses on key changes in the Canadian economic data since oil prices began to decline in mid-2014. The presentation highlights recent trends related to economic growth and labour market conditions, the impact of lower oil prices in current dollar terms and in volume terms, and the impact of a weaker Canadian dollar on merchandise trade and manufacturing.

    This presentation complements the release of Recent Developments in the Canadian Economy: Spring 2017. The graphs are based on seasonally adjusted data available in CANSIM on April 7th, 2017.

    Release date: 2017-04-20

  • Articles and reports: 13-604-M2017084
    Description:

    The Tourism Satellite Account (TSA) measures the economic importance of tourism in Canada. The TSA extracts economic information on tourism from the Canadian System of Macroeconomic Accounts (CSMA). It uses the same measures of inputs, outputs, GDP and employment as the CSMA, and reorganizes information on tourism following the Tourism Satellite Account: Recommended Methodological Framework.

    Release date: 2017-03-30

  • Articles and reports: 11-627-M2017007
    Description:

    An overview of the repercussions of this natural disaster on current production, insurance payments, and future planned construction are presented along with other contextual data. From localized impacts to the national picture the data shows the very different impacts the wildfires had on industry and Canadian citizens. The infographic, Fort McMurray 2016 Wildfires - Economic Impact, presents information from multiple Statistics Canada surveys including the Labour Force Survey (LFS) and Gross Domestic Product by Industry (GDP).

    Release date: 2017-03-16

  • Articles and reports: 13-605-X201700114771
    Description:

    The sharing economy has received a lot of attention lately from policy makers, businesses, the media and the public. The concept of the sharing economy is not new—people have been bartering and sharing goods and services throughout human history. Enabled by technology and social trends, the sharing economy is transforming the ways in which economic agents can produce and consume goods and services.

    Release date: 2017-02-21

Reference (35)

Reference (35) (25 of 35 results)

  • Technical products: 15F0004X
    Description:

    The input-output (IO) models are generally used to simulate the economic impacts of an expenditure on a given basket of goods and services or the output of one or several industries. The simulation results from a "shock" to an IO model will show the direct, indirect and induced impacts on GDP, which industries benefit the most, the number of jobs created, estimates of indirect taxes and subsidies generated, etc. For more details, ask us for the Guide to using the input-output simulation model, available free of charge upon request.

    At various times, clients have requested the use of IO price, energy, tax and market models. Given their availability, arrangements can be made to use these models on request.

    The national IO model was not released in 2015 or 2016.

    Release date: 2017-06-09

  • Technical products: 15F0046X
    Description:

    The input-output multipliers are derived from the supply and use tables. They are used to assess the effects on the economy of an exogenous change in final demand for the output of a given industry. They provide a measure of the interdependence between an industry and the rest of the economy.

    The national and provincial multipliers show the direct, indirect, and induced effects on gross output, the detailed components of GDP, jobs, and imports. Like the supply and use tables, the multipliers are presented at four levels of aggregation: Detail level (236 industries), Link-1997 level (187 industries), Link-1961 level (111 industries) and Summary level (35 industries).

    National and provincial multipliers were not released in 2015 and 2016.

    Release date: 2017-06-09

  • Technical products: 15F0009X
    Description:

    The input-output (IO) models are generally used to simulate the economic impacts of an expenditure on a given basket of goods and services or the output of one or several industries. The simulation results from a "shock" to an IO model will show the direct, indirect and induced impacts on GDP, which industries benefit the most, the number of jobs created, estimates of indirect taxes and subsidies generated, etc. For more details, ask us for the Guide to using the input-output simulation model, available free of charge upon request.

    At various times, clients have requested the use of IO price, energy, tax and market models. Given their availability, arrangements can be made to use these models on request.

    The interprovincial IO model was not released in 2015 or 2016.

    Release date: 2017-06-09

  • Index and guides: 13-606-G
    Description:

    This guide provides a detailed explanation of the structure, concepts and history of Canada’s System of Macroeconomic Accounts.

    Release date: 2017-05-31

  • Index and guides: 13-606-G201600114623
    Description:

    An explanation of the structure and concepts of Canada’s balance of payments and international investment position accounts.

    Release date: 2017-05-31

  • Index and guides: 13-606-G201600114622
    Description:

    An explanation of the national accounts price-quantity decomposition using Laspeyres, Paasche and Fisher indexes.

    Release date: 2016-11-30

  • Index and guides: 13-606-G201600114621
    Description:

    An explanation of the structure and concepts of Canada’s financial flow and national balance sheet accounts.

    Release date: 2016-11-30

  • Index and guides: 13-606-G201600114617
    Description:

    A review of the seven-decade history of Canada’s System of Macroeconomic Accounts connecting the story to the evolution of the international SNA, plus a discussion of the uses and users of Canada’s accounts.

    Release date: 2016-08-31

  • Index and guides: 13-606-G201600114620
    Description:

    An explanation of the structure and concepts of Canada’s income and expenditure accounts.

    Release date: 2016-08-31

  • Index and guides: 13-607-X
    Description:

    The Methodological Guide: Canadian System of Macroeconomic Accounts provides readers with information on macroeconomic accounts at Statistics Canada. It provides links to produced data and publications and describes the concepts, sources, and methods used to compile them. Topics include gross domestic product, national economic accounts (incomes, expenditures, savings, capital formation, financial flows and balance sheet accounts), supply and use tables, provincial and territorial economic accounts, productivity, balance of payments, international investment position and government finance statistics.

    This user's guide has been developed by the Macroeconomic Accounts Program to facilitate access to macroeconomic accounting information throughout Statistics Canada and to explain its linkage with international standards, such as the System of National Accounts, 2008. This guide is continually being updated to maintain its relevance.

    Release date: 2016-05-31

  • Index and guides: 13-606-G201600114618
    Description:

    An explanation of key national accounting concepts involving stocks and flows; the distinction between price and volume changes; production, distribution, consumption and accumulation; residence; institutional units and sectors; classifications; and accounting concepts. Also includes a description of SNA 2008’s sequence of accounts.

    Release date: 2016-05-31

  • Index and guides: 13-606-G201600114616
    Description:

    An introduction and overview of the Canadian System of Macroeconomic Accounts

    Release date: 2016-05-31

  • Index and guides: 13-606-G201600114619
    Description:

    An explanation of the structure and concepts of Canada’s supply and use accounts.

    Release date: 2016-05-31

  • Index and guides: 16-509-X
    Description:

    The Methodological Guide: Canadian System of Environmental-Economic Accounting provides readers with information on environmental-economic accounts at Statistics Canada. It provides links to produced data and publications and describes the concepts, sources, and methods used to compile them. Topics include ecosystem accounting, asset accounts (natural resources in physical and monetary terms), physical flow accounts (energy and water use, and waste and greenhouse gas emissions), environmental activity statistics (expenditures on environmental protection), and the applications and extensions of those accounts (attribution of physical flows to final demand and intensity measures).

    This user's guide has been developed by the Environmental Statistics Program to facilitate access to environmental-economic accounting information throughout Statistics Canada and to explain its linkage with international standards, the United Nations System of Environmental-Economic Accounting. This guide is continually being updated to maintain its relevance.

    Release date: 2016-04-22

  • Classification: 12-603-X
    Description:

    Canadian Classification of Institutional Units and Sectors (CCIUS) 2012 is the departmental standard for classifying institutional units and sectors. This classification is used for economic statistics and includes definitions for its 171 classes. CCIUS 2012 was developed as a result of the implementation of international recommendations published in the 2008 System of National Accounts manual (SNA 2008).

    Release date: 2016-02-11

  • Index and guides: 16-507-X
    Description:

    These educational resources provide instructors with innovative materials, lesson plans and case study assignments based on environmental statistics produced by Statistics Canada. Resources have been developed for educators at the elementary, high school and post-secondary levels.

    Curriculum links include grades 1 to 12 geography, social studies, biology, mathematics, science and economics, as well as introductory post-secondary geography and environmental science.

    Release date: 2015-09-17

  • Index and guides: 16-507-X2015001
    Description:

    These educational resources provide instructors with innovative material, lesson plans, handouts and assignments to accompany the 2011 Households and the Environment report (catalogue no. 11-526-X). The materials and activities were developed for Statistics Canada by Enable Education.

    Resources were developed for an elementary school audience. Curriculum links include grades 1 to 3 mathematics, social studies, science and technology, as well as arts, language arts, and health and safety.

    Release date: 2015-09-17

  • Index and guides: 16-507-X2015002
    Description:

    These educational resources provide instructors with innovative material, lesson plans, handouts and assignments to accompany the 2011 Households and the Environment report (catalogue no. 11-526-X). The materials and activities were developed for Statistics Canada by Enable Education.

    Resources were developed for a secondary school audience. Curriculum links include grades 9 to 12 science, business, environmental science, mathematics, with cross-curricular links to family studies, language arts, technology education and visual arts.

    Release date: 2015-09-17

  • Technical products: 15-206-X
    Description:

    This reference publication on productivity in Canada shows how productivity trends affect Canadian living standards and measures the relative productivity performance of Canada and other countries. Its articles cover productivity and related issues, and it illuminates the sources underlying economic growth in Canada.

    Release date: 2015-01-26

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2015039
    Description:

    This paper generates updated estimates of depreciation rates to be used in the Canadian Productivity Accounts for the calculation of capital stock and the user cost of capital. Estimates are derived of depreciation profiles for a diverse set of assets, based on patterns of resale prices and retirement ages.

    A maximum likelihood technique is used to jointly estimate changes in the valuation of assets over the course of their service life, as well as the nature of the discard process used to dispose of assets to generate depreciation rates. This method is more efficient than others in producing estimates with less bias and higher efficiency.

    The earlier estimates that were derived for the period from 1985 to 2001 are compared with those for the latest period, from 2002 to 2010.

    Release date: 2015-01-26

  • Index and guides: 16-507-X2014001
    Description:

    These educational resources provide instructors with innovative materials, lesson plans and case study assignments to accompany the 2013 release of the Human Activity and the Environment article, “Measuring ecosystem goods and services in Canada.” The materials and activities were developed by the Critical Thinking Consortium, a non-profit, registered association of 55 educational partners—school districts, schools, teacher associations and other educational organizations.

    Resources were developed for a junior high school, senior high school and introductory post-secondary audience. Curriculum links include grades 7 to 12 geography, social studies, biology, science and economics, as well as introductory post-secondary geography and environmental science.

    Release date: 2014-09-24

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2014038
    Description:

    This paper provides an overview of the productivity program at Statistics Canada and a brief description of Canada’s productivity performance. The paper defines productivity and the various measures that are used to investigate different aspects of productivity growth. It describes the difference between partial productivity measures (such as labour productivity) and a more complete measure (multifactor productivity) and the advantages and disadvantages of each. The paper explains why productivity is important. It outlines how productivity growth fits into the growth accounting framework and how this framework is used to examine the various sources of economic growth. The paper briefly discusses the challenges that face statisticians in measuring productivity growth. It also provides an overview of Canada’s long-term productivity performance and compares Canada to the United States—both in terms of productivity levels and productivity growth rates.

    Release date: 2014-09-15

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2014037
    Description:

    This paper presents estimates of effective multifactor productivity (MFP) growth for Canada, the United States, Australia, Japan and selected European Union (EU) countries, based on the EU KLEMS productivity database and the World Input-Output Tables. Effective MFP growth captures the impact of the productivity gains in upstream industries on the productivity growth and international competitiveness of domestic industries, thereby providing an appropriate measure of productivity growth and international competitiveness in the production of final demand products such as consumption, investment and export products. A substantial portion of MFP growth, especially for small, open economies such as Canada’s, is attributable to gains in the production of intermediate inputs in foreign countries. Productivity growth tends to be higher in investment and export products than for the production of consumption products. Technical progress and productivity growth in foreign countries have made a larger contribution to production growth in investment and export products than in consumption products. The analysis provides empirical evidence consistent with the hypothesis that effective MFP growth is a more informative relevant indicator of international competitiveness than is standard MFP growth.

    Release date: 2014-09-09

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2014036
    Description:

    Leasing is an important means of gaining access to assets, of obtaining finance, and of reducing a lessee’s exposure to the risks inherent to asset ownership. A lease can be either a financial lease (capital lease) or an operating lease (capital rental). A financial lease is one where the legal owner of an asset (lessor) passes the economic ownership to the user of the asset (lessee), who then accepts the operating risks and receives the economic benefits from using the asset in a productive activity. Under an operating lease, the lessor is both the legal owner and the economic owner of the asset leased (rented), bearing the operating risks and receiving the economic benefits from the asset. The lessor transfers only the right to use the asset to the lessee.

    Leasing offers firms the possibility to acquire the right to use capital assets under terms that differ from those prevailing through other financial instruments. The recording of leased assets in the Canadian System of National Accounts is ownership-based rather than user-based. The separation of capital ownership, in particular legal ownership, from the use of capital assets poses challenges to productivity measurement. To obtain consistent productivity measures at an industry level, leased and rented capital assets must be reallocated from owners’ accounts to users’ accounts. By using the General Index of Financial Information (GIFI) corporate balance sheets and detailed input-output tables, this paper tests the robustness of existing practices of data collection on leased and rented capital.

    Release date: 2014-07-22

  • Technical products: 15-206-X2014035
    Description:

    This paper highlights revisions to multifactor productivity (MFP) growth and related variables in the business sector and in individual industries, which resulted from the historical revision of the Canadian System of National Accounts (CSNA) released October 1, 2012, revisions to the labour productivity accounts released October 12, 2012, and changes in the estimation of capital input that were made in order to improve its consistency in industry MFP growth estimates.

    The multifactor productivity program produces indexes of MFP and related measures (output, capital input, labour input and intermediate inputs) for the business sector, broad economic sub-sectors, and their constituent industries. The MFP program divides growth in labour productivity into its key determinants: capital intensity (changes in capital per hour worked), investment in human capital, and MFP, which includes technological change, organizational innovation and economies of scale.

    Release date: 2014-07-08

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